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An account of the causes?

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  • An account of the causes?

    G'day ACW Gurus,

    I'll admit my knowledge of the ACW is general at best with a focus more on the years leading up to the war and a few of the more well known battles. I only own a couple books on the topic but this offering,...

    http://www.amazon.com/dp/1400040159/...000_pe_epc_lm3

    ,...has caught my eye. I tend to shy away from books that are too heaviliy into the 'first hand accounts' preferring the more scholarly analysis. If one were to seek a single volume on the causes and slide into civil war, would this text do or is there a preferred "standard"?

    Cheers.
    The Purist

    Words ought to be a little wild, for they are the assault of thoughts on the unthinking - John Maynard Keynes.

  • #2
    Originally posted by The Purist View Post
    G'day ACW Gurus,

    I'll admit my knowledge of the ACW is general at best with a focus more on the years leading up to the war and a few of the more well known battles. I only own a couple books on the topic but this offering,...

    http://www.amazon.com/dp/1400040159/...000_pe_epc_lm3

    ,...has caught my eye. I tend to shy away from books that are too heaviliy into the 'first hand accounts' preferring the more scholarly analysis. If one were to seek a single volume on the causes and slide into civil war, would this text do or is there a preferred "standard"?

    Cheers.
    I haven't read that, so I can't comment. However, James McPherson's "Battle Cry of Freedom" is a great single volume history of the period.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by The Ibis View Post
      I haven't read that, so I can't comment. However, James McPherson's "Battle Cry of Freedom" is a great single volume history of the period.
      I agree completely. But the causes IMO boil down to one.....slavery. Yes, others are cited, but like the planets revolve around the sun those causes revolve around slavery.

      Regards,
      Dennis
      Last edited by D1J1; 10 May 12, 20:08.
      If stupid was a criminal offense Sea Lion believers would be doing life.

      Shouting out to Half Pint for bringing back the big mugs!

      Comment


      • #4
        "Battle Cry Of Freedom" does an excellent if not outstanding job providing information including presentations of the many legislative factors that contributed to the conflict. Precise expanations of the Dred Scott Decision, The Kansas Nebraska Act, The Missouri Compromise, Fugtive Slave Law, etc. help the student see how the political decisions made in the years prior to the war helped instigate many of the hard feelings and contemptness between the two governments. McPherson also focus's on the economic issues facing each government and how these government's actions were dictated by these economic issues and factors.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by The Purist View Post
          G'day ACW Gurus,

          I'll admit my knowledge of the ACW is general at best with a focus more on the years leading up to the war and a few of the more well known battles. I only own a couple books on the topic but this offering,...

          http://www.amazon.com/dp/1400040159/...000_pe_epc_lm3

          ,...has caught my eye. I tend to shy away from books that are too heaviliy into the 'first hand accounts' preferring the more scholarly analysis. If one were to seek a single volume on the causes and slide into civil war, would this text do or is there a preferred "standard"?

          Cheers.
          The Purist,

          As the others have stated, the best single volume history of the sectionalism period through the Civil War (1848-1865) that encompasses the political, social, economic and military aspects is James McPherson's Battle Cry of Freedom. Probably the weakest part of the book is the military coverage.

          Supplement with Herman Hattaway and Archer Jones How the North Won: A Military History of the Civil War an outstanding military history of the Civil War which, is particularly strong in it's discussion of logistics. The outstanding American Military historian Russell Weigley's A Great Civil War is also a good choice, especially if you are more interested in the political and military aspects of the Civil War.

          Comment


          • #6
            As to the subject of the thread..."An account of the causes".... without question "Battle Cry of Freedom" IS the Gold standard.

            John
            The most visable part of a persons education is their parents example !

            Christianity is made far too complicated by far too many denominations.
            It's truly a simple concept.
            Dont take my word for it---Read the Book of Romans!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by D1J1 View Post
              I agree completely. But the causes IMO boil down to one.....slavery. Yes, others are cited, but like the planets revolve around the sun those causes revolve around slavery.

              Regards,
              Dennis
              Couldn't have been slavery!! That was legal!! Had to be something else!

              Marshall
              In all my perplexities and distresses, the Bible has never failed to give me light and strength.
              Robert E. Lee

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by B7B Southern View Post
                Couldn't have been slavery!! That was legal!! Had to be something else!

                Marshall
                You're right on it being legal Marshall, but the fear of it not being allowed to expand or to remain so is what drove secession and the war! Sadly Congress then didn't have the courage to solve the problem instead of doing compromise after compromise that only made the problem fester to the boiling point it became!

                Regards,
                Dennis
                If stupid was a criminal offense Sea Lion believers would be doing life.

                Shouting out to Half Pint for bringing back the big mugs!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by D1J1 View Post
                  You're right on it being legal Marshall, but the fear of it not being allowed to expand or to remain so is what drove secession and the war! Sadly Congress then didn't have the courage to solve the problem instead of doing compromise after compromise that only made the problem fester to the boiling point it became!

                  Regards,
                  Dennis
                  Dennis,

                  You are correct. With the Mexican War the U.S. increased it's size by a 1/3 and opened up the question of the expansion of slavery into those territories. Look how many Southerners went after the Wilmot Proviso, which would forbid slavery in the newly aquired Mexican Territory as Unconstitutional. The Proviso passed the House, but could never muster the votes in the Senate.

                  Go to the Charleston Mercury during the day (spent sometime in the microfilm section at the Wilson Library, UNC) and you will find that the issue of slavery was always at the forefront as a major issue either over the legality of it's expansion or it possibly being outlawed.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by D1J1 View Post
                    You're right on it being legal Marshall, but the fear of it not being allowed to expand or to remain so is what drove secession and the war! Sadly Congress then didn't have the courage to solve the problem instead of doing compromise after compromise that only made the problem fester to the boiling point it became!

                    Regards,
                    Dennis
                    Where would it expand to? Kansas didn't have but 9 slaves in 1860 and it wasn't long till they were gone. Missouri didn't have very many. Past that what would slaves be doing past Texas?? There ain't no cotton beyond that.

                    I believe the reason The Confederacy wanted those lower states was to reach the Pacific for obvious reasons.

                    Marsh
                    In all my perplexities and distresses, the Bible has never failed to give me light and strength.
                    Robert E. Lee

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I believe it was about minority rule versus majority rule. The southern powers that be obviously not strong for democracy since they rejected the result of an election. Also the US the only significant democracy at the time so a kind of showcase for the system. Slavery more of a symptom of the southern society (in fact some slaves thought of themselves as above the "white trash", and the aristocracy argued they were treated better than factory workers elsewhere). Getting the western states non-slave was the only way to make it illegal (by amendment), that was the southern fear.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I strongly suggest reading the PRIMARY history of the time period. It is all written out for you:

                        http://civilwarcauses.org/

                        Go through these sources. Slavery emerges as the primary, but not the only cause. You cannot argue with what the leaders-political, economic, religious, & social, were saying.

                        Here's a fun quiz to take on the causes:
                        http://bellsouthpwp.net/m/e/mebuckner/civwarquiz.htm

                        AFTER the war, many of the men who had lost (*cough* Southerners) CHANGED their tunes on what had been said 4 years + on the matter. Many knew that the second phase of the Civil War had begun & wanted to do everything they could to influence the country into believing the war was about ANYTHING other than slavery. The problem was that the words & deeds of these folks were still out there to be seen. Welcome to The Lost Cause. The sad part is that many of those victors (*cough* Northerners) only wanted to move on & forget about that bitter part in American history. They clearly dropped the ball when it came to blacks & promoting the factual reasons for the war-they wanted the nation to be healed. They were more interested in the short term gain of bringing the South back into the fold rather than antagonizing them & starting things afresh.

                        Do the research. Look for the primary materials. The Samuel May Anti-slavery collection is another place of wealth to look:
                        http://dlxs.library.cornell.edu/m/mayantislavery/
                        The muffled drums sad roll has beat the soldier's last tatoo. No more on life's parade shall meet that brave and fallen few.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by B7B Southern View Post
                          Where would it expand to? Kansas didn't have but 9 slaves in 1860 and it wasn't long till they were gone. Missouri didn't have very many. Past that what would slaves be doing past Texas?? There ain't no cotton beyond that.

                          I believe the reason The Confederacy wanted those lower states was to reach the Pacific for obvious reasons.

                          Marsh
                          Marsh,

                          It isn't about cotton, or tobacco. Possibly later it wouldn't have been about citrus fruits or vegetables or nuts (the tree kind, not the human kind) from California or anywhere else.

                          Beginning in 1857 Congress could not prohibit slavery in the territories as per the Dred Scott decision. All territories are at that point at least open to slavery. In at least some pro-slavery circles it was believed that the peculiar institution should have been expanded into Mexico and Cuba through the auspices of the United States military.

                          The type of crop or possibly industrial product is not relevant. The continuation or expansion of slavery is the goal. Slavery is the vehicle by which the slave owners and their upper class allies maintain local and national political, economic and social power.

                          Regards,
                          Dennis
                          If stupid was a criminal offense Sea Lion believers would be doing life.

                          Shouting out to Half Pint for bringing back the big mugs!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by D1J1 View Post
                            Marsh,

                            It isn't about cotton, or tobacco. Possibly later it wouldn't have been about citrus fruits or vegetables or nuts (the tree kind, not the human kind) from California or anywhere else.

                            Beginning in 1857 Congress could not prohibit slavery in the territories as per the Dred Scott decision. All territories are at that point at least open to slavery. In at least some pro-slavery circles it was believed that the peculiar institution should have been expanded into Mexico and Cuba through the auspices of the United States military.

                            The type of crop or possibly industrial product is not relevant. The continuation or expansion of slavery is the goal. Slavery is the vehicle by which the slave owners and their upper class allies maintain local and national political, economic and social power.

                            Regards,
                            Dennis
                            But, again, Dennis. There is no where for slavery to be effective outside the cotton belt. I posted that in Kansas in 1860 wasn't but nine but after reviewing the census, there were none! See below web page.

                            http://www.sonofthesouth.net/slavery...ave-census.htm
                            In all my perplexities and distresses, the Bible has never failed to give me light and strength.
                            Robert E. Lee

                            Comment

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