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SCOTUS Opens the Way to Legalized Sports Betting

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  • SCOTUS Opens the Way to Legalized Sports Betting

    I have no issue with this. Given the amount of money wagered, the states should absolutely see increased revenue from a sports book.

    This will not, repeat NOT, eliminate illegal gambling. The bookie will give you 2 things the state will not. First is the ability to bet on credit. The second is no taxes on winnings.

    Regards,
    Dennis
    If stupid was a criminal offense Sea Lion believers would be doing life.

    Shouting out to Half Pint for bringing back the big mugs!

  • #2
    Perhaps a link to the decision would be useful?
    Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
      Perhaps a link to the decision would be useful?
      Here you go

      http://www.scotusblog.com/case-files...association-2/
      Holding: Provisions of the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act that prohibit state authorization and licensing of sports gambling schemes violate the Constitution’s anticommandeering rule; no other PASPA provisions are severable from the provisions at issue.

      Judgment: Reversed, 6-3, in an opinion by Justice Alito on May 14, 2018. Justice Alito delivered the opinion of the court, in which Chief Justice Roberts and Justices Kennedy, Thomas, Kagan, and Gorsuch joined, and in which Justice Breyer joined as to all but Part VI–B. Justice Thomas filed a concurring opinion. Justice Breyer filed an opinion concurring in part and dissenting in part. Justice Ginsburg filed a dissenting opinion, in which Justice Sotomayor joined, and in which Justice Breyer joined in part.
      In plain english
      http://www.espn.com/chalk/story/_/id...ports-gambling

      The Supreme Court struck down a federal law that prohibits sports gambling Monday in a landmark decision that gives states the go-ahead to legalize betting on sports.

      The court ruled 6-3 to strike down the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act, a 1992 law that barred state-authorized sports gambling with some exceptions. It made Nevada the only state where a person could wager on the results of a single game.

      EDITOR'S PICKS

      NFL wants Congress to enact betting framework
      On the day the Supreme Court struck down a landmark law prohibiting gambling on sports, the NFL said Monday that it wants Congress to enact legislation on legalized sports betting.

      With legal sports betting, how will NBA, MLB protect integrity of game?
      Billions will be wagered at new legal sportsbooks across the United States. The NBA and MLB are angling to reap some of the profits.

      Full coverage of sports betting legalization
      Here is ESPN Chalk's one-stop shop of all relevant content, following the Supreme Court's ruling in favor of New Jersey.
      States that want to offer legal sports betting may now do so, and New Jersey plans to be first. Delaware, Mississippi, New York, Pennsylvania and West Virginia are among the states expected to quickly get into the legal bookmaking game.

      The court ruled in favor of New Jersey and against the NCAA, NFL, NBA, NHL and Major League Baseball, capping a nearly six-year legal battle and overturning a federal statute that the sports leagues had adamantly stood by for more than 20 years.

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      • #4
        And here is some legal analysis
        http://www.scotusblog.com/2018/05/op...-gambling-law/

        The Supreme Court agreed to consider the state’s constitutional challenge to PASPA, and today the court reversed. In a decision by Justice Samuel Alito, the court began by explaining that the “anticommandeering doctrine may sound arcane, but it is simply the expression of a fundamental structural decision incorporated into the Constitution” – “the decision to withhold from Congress the power to issue orders directly to the States.” And that, the majority continued, is exactly the problem with the provision of PASPA that the state challenged, which bars states from authorizing sports gambling: It “unequivocally dictates what a state legislature may and may not do.” “It is as if,” the majority suggested, “federal officers were installed in state legislative chambers and were armed with the authority to stop legislators from voting on any offending proposals. A more direct affront to state sovereignty,” Alito concluded, “is not easy to imagine.”

        The court also rejected the argument, made by the leagues and the federal government, that the PASPA provision barring states from authorizing sports betting does not “commandeer” the states, but instead merely supersedes any state laws that conflict with the provision – a legal doctrine known as pre-emption. Pre-emption, the majority explained, “is based on a federal law that regulates the conduct of private actors,” but here “there is simply no way to understand the provision prohibiting state authorization as anything other than a direct command to the States,” which “is exactly what the anticommandeering rule does not allow.”

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        • #5
          Interesting.

          Given the impact of illegal gambling on pro sports, I expect this will move the hiring of sports pros for their ability to act, ala WWF wrestling.
          Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by D1J1 View Post
            I have no issue with this. Given the amount of money wagered, the states should absolutely see increased revenue from a sports book.

            This will not, repeat NOT, eliminate illegal gambling. The bookie will give you 2 things the state will not. First is the ability to bet on credit. The second is no taxes on winnings.

            Regards,
            Dennis
            Eliminating entirely is one thing; making it obsolete and marginal another. The bookie cannot offer you a mobile app and live streams for example.

            Does this allow US player to bet outside the country? And how would that affect taxation? In Europe you don't have to pay any taxes for gambling wins(as far as I know).
            Wisdom is personal

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Karri View Post
              Eliminating entirely is one thing; making it obsolete and marginal another. The bookie cannot offer you a mobile app and live streams for example.

              Does this allow US player to bet outside the country? And how would that affect taxation? In Europe you don't have to pay any taxes for gambling wins(as far as I know).
              I think to the gambler the ability to gamble on credit and the nonpayment of taxes is more important than the items you list. I can see where the tech innovations would be more appealing to some, but I find the in-game bets rather silly.

              I did not find any indication that this ruling will affect any of the laws dealing with off shore or international gambling. Winnings are taxable in the US for US citizens period.

              Regards,
              Dennis
              If stupid was a criminal offense Sea Lion believers would be doing life.

              Shouting out to Half Pint for bringing back the big mugs!

              Comment

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