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Are there Bases or Outs in Cricket?

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  • Are there Bases or Outs in Cricket?

    Are there Bases or Outs (as there are in baseball) in Cricket?

  • #2
    Outs yes.

    Bases no.
    Matthew 5:9 Blessed are the cheesemakers

    That's right bitches. I'm blessed!

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    • #3
      Do people run, besides in attempt to catch the ball?

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      • #4
        No bases in.

        That's only in the British form of baseball - rounders.

        But that's only played by girls so I'm not well up on it.


        Philip
        "The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." Bertrand Russell

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        • #5
          Originally posted by PhilipLaos View Post
          No bases in.

          That's only in the British form of baseball - rounders.

          But that's only played by girls so I'm not well up on it.


          Philip
          Dunno, perhaps it could be argued that there are two bases in cricket:- the two wicket areas between which the batsmen run.
          "I dogmatise and am contradicted, and in this conflict of opinions and sentiments I find delight".
          Samuel Johnson.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Cicero View Post
            Do people run, besides in attempt to catch the ball?
            You run between the two wickets to score points;

            I hope this vid answers some of your questions, it's the best I know of to explain the basic game;

            At about 1.25 your running question starts to get answered
            ------
            'I would rather be exposed to the inconveniencies attending too much liberty than those attending too small a degree of it.' - Thomas Jefferson

            If you have questions about the forum please check the FAQ/Rules

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            • #7
              This one too is fairly good for explaining it
              ------
              'I would rather be exposed to the inconveniencies attending too much liberty than those attending too small a degree of it.' - Thomas Jefferson

              If you have questions about the forum please check the FAQ/Rules

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              • #8
                A lot of yanks find it hard to believe that a game that lasts five ,yes FIVE days can end in a draw,well you're not alone, a lot of Brits find it incredible too.

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                • #9
                  Two batters run between two wickets to score runs so they have the same functionality as the bases in baseball. The two videos posted above do a good job explaining the very basics but let me add some meat to it, using baseball terms. It's gonna be a pretty long read but be patient and take it one line at a time. It's long especially because I'll try to make things as clear as possible.

                  When trying to explain cricket to an American I pretend the only version that exists is the Twenty20 (the game that takes about 3 hours to play, like baseball). Other formats like Test cricket and OneDayInternational are never likely to be on American cable TV (because of their length). So there's no point in getting confused trying to learn about them. Anyways, here it goes ..



                  - Two teams of 11 players each.

                  - The game is played in two halves called innings. In first inning one team bats and the other pitches/fields. In the 2nd inning it's switched. The object is to get more runs than the other team, of course.

                  - The inning starts with 2 batters, 1 at each end of the base (there are only two 'bases' in cricket, in the middle of the field). Once a batter or his batting partner is out the next batter in order comes to bat.

                  - As a batter you can be out only once per game in cricket and a team is allowed 10 outs/wickets. When the 10th out happens (or the 20 'over' is played which I'll explain next) the inning is done for the batting team.

                  - The game is played in 20 overs in each half. An over is a set of 6 pitches thrown by a pitcher (called bowler). So basically about 120 pitches (plus few wide and no-balls that don't count) are thrown per inning/half by 5-6 different pitchers. A pitcher can't pitch back to back overs or more than 4 overs in total.


                  = Runs are scored in several ways:

                  1. When a batter hits a ball far enough or in the gap he runs to the other base (and his batting partner runs to this base) before a fielder from the opposing team collects and throws the ball back. They get 1 run for every time they switch bases. Back and forth between the bases (if they feel they've hit the ball far enough) they can score 2 or 3 runs before the ball comes back.

                  2. If a batter hits the ball and it goes all the way to the boundary ropes without touching the ground (like a homerun in baseball) it's 6 runs.

                  3. If it goes to the boundary on a roll or by bouncing on the ground it's 4 runs.

                  4. If a pitcher throws unfair pitches (i.e. too wide or high of the zone or if his leg goes over the line before he throws) one run is awarded to the batting team.

                  5. If a ball goes all the way to the boundary on a wide or no-ball pitch 5 runs are given (1 for the unfair pitch + 4 for the boundary).


                  - The ball doesn't have to be hit. Runs can also be scored on 'wild' pitches where the catcher standing behind the stumps (3 sticks) fails to catch/stop the ball and it goes too far. If the ball goes off any part of the batters body they can still score runs off it.

                  - Unlike in baseball, a batter doesn't have to run after he hits a ball.

                  - There is no foul territory in cricket. The ball can be hit in any direction (360 degree).

                  - First 6 overs in each half/inning have mandatory 'power-plays' where no more than 2 fielders are allowed outside the 30-yard circle. It's designed to encourage aggressive hitting at the beginning of the innings but it can also be risky for the batters (higher chances of being out).



                  = There are several ways for a fielding/pitching team to get the batters out:

                  1. If a batter swings and misses and the ball hits the stumps (again, 3 sticks at the base) he's 'bowled' out. If the ball ricochets off the bat/legs/hands and hits the stumps behind he's still bowled out.

                  2. If the batter blocks the ball with his legs/protective pads and the umpire decides the ball was projected to hit the stumps if it wasn't for his legs/pads he's given LBW (leg-before-wicket) out. In the 50-over game, a technology called 'hawk-eye' is used in the umpire review if a team challenges the call.

                  3. If the batter pops the ball in the air and a fielder catches it he's 'caught' out like a fly-out or pop-out in baseball.

                  4. While running between the bases if a batter or his partner can't make it to the safe line (the long white line) in a base before a fielder tags the stumps with ball in his hand one of the batters (whoever was closest to the broken stumps) is 'run out'. The fielder doesn't HAVE to tag the stumps; he can also throw the ball at the stumps from anywhere on the field. If the stumps are hit before the batter reaches a base he's is out.

                  5. Sometimes a batter steps couple yards out of his safe line split-second before a pitcher throws the ball so he can time the bounce of the ball. If he swings and misses, the catcher standing close can quickly tag the stumps (with ball in his hands) before the batter gets back and he will be 'stumped' out.


                  - There are few more types of outs but they're rare.

                  - Most of the pitches thrown are bounced on a hard surface in front of the batter but some baseball-style full tosses are thrown time to time. On a full toss the ball can't go over the batter's waist (or it will be called no-ball). If the ball is bounced it can go as high as the batter's shoulder and still be a fair pitch.

                  - Pitchers are allowed to hit the batter's body/head as long as the ball is bounced first. 'Beanball' is fair in cricket.

                  - The pitchers are not allowed to 'chuck' the balls baseball-style. Their arms have to be pretty much straight while throwing the balls (can't bend more than certain degrees). That's why running starts are needed when throwing fast/medium-pace balls to gain speed.

                  - If a no-ball happens due to the pitcher over-stepping his line before a throw the next ball is a 'free-hit' (in addition to being penalized a run on no-ball). A batter can't be out on a free-hit (except run out?).

                  - The fielders are not allowed to wear gloves/mitts. The only exceptions are the wicketkeeper (catcher) and the slips (the fielder that sometimes stands close to the wicketkeeper).


                  That's pretty much all. I'll explain how to understand the scoreboard in my next post.

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                  • #10
                    If you got all of that, here's how to read the scoreboard and other figures on a cricket broadcast:

                    Example: [ENG]_[v]_[AUS 88-5]_[15.4 / 20]_[THIS OVER 1 0 W 4 ]_[RUN RATE 5.62]

                    It means:

                    1. England is bowling vs.

                    2. Australia is batting

                    3. Australia scored 88 runs so far and have 5 of their wickets gone or batters out (and 5 left in hand)

                    4. 15.4 overs (out of the allotted 20) have been played so far. That's 15 overs and 4 balls (2 more balls left to be pitched in this over)

                    5. In this over they scored 1 run off the first pitch, no run off the 2nd, lost one of their wickets on the 3rd pitch (W = wicket), and hit a boundary for 4 runs off the 4th.
                    In this area sometimes you'll see 0wd, 0nb, 2lb or 4nb. 0wd and 0nb means 1 run came from a wide ball and no-ball respectively. 1lb means 1 run from leg-bye (ball went far enough after hitting the batters leg that he made a run for it). 4nb = 5 runs (1 noball + 4 for a boundary the batter hit on that no-ball).

                    6. Run Rate 5.62 means Australia scored 5.62 runs per over (88 runs divided by 15.4 overs) so far in the inning.

                    7. If you see the letter 'P' next to the over count (15.4/20 in this case) it indicates Power-play is on.

                    In the 2nd inning, you'll see a 'Required Run Rate' for the batting team time to time. It shows the run rate (per over) they will need from the remaining overs in order to beat the other team's score.

                    Lets say,
                    Team A's final score was 139.
                    Team B obviously needs 140 runs and scored 60 so far in 10 overs. Their current run rate is 6.00. They will need 80 more from the last 10 overs. That means their required run rate is 8.00 (per over or about 1.3 runs per pitch).

                    It can be pretty exciting to see the run rate and required run rate keep changing with each pitch as they usually give you a good idea who's leading or losing the game. The number of wickets lost or left in hand can also add to that sense of how the game's going. Many on-field strategies (for both sides) can be influenced by these. The on-screen graphic 'At this stage, Team A had X runs/ for Y wickets' that is shown in the 2nd inning can also aid your understanding of which team is doing better so far.

                    Well..these are pretty much all you need to know to follow a game of cricket, although learning all the strategies/nuances of the game (which can be done by watching some games on TV) can help you enjoy it better. If you're curious enough you can try your knowledge on a cricket broadcast on ESPN3 (they're suppose to show dozens of games this month) and see if all these make sense.

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                    • #11
                      ^ Windy?
                      I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by slick_miester View Post
                        ^ Windy?
                        Windies is short for West Indies (W. Indies)

                        Paul
                        ‘Tis said his form is tiny, yet
                        All human ills he can subdue,
                        Or with a bauble or medal
                        Can win mans heart for you;
                        And many a blessing know to stew
                        To make a megloamaniac bright;
                        Give honour to the dainty Corse,
                        The Pixie is a little shite.

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                        • #13
                          In an ESL class I was teaching, I had to explain cricket to a group of Arabic students.

                          I actually like cricket, but on this occasion I decided to take a comic approach, so I described it ball by ball, over by over, emphasizing the slowness and time-consuming nature of the game.

                          Then, when the students were totally convinced that cricket is a totally boring game, I concluded with:

                          "And they do this for 5 days!"


                          Philip
                          "The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." Bertrand Russell

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Dibble201Bty View Post
                            Windies is short for West Indies (W. Indies)

                            Paul
                            Yeah, I know. Windy immigrants in New York have even founded their own cricket league. In other words, I'm assuming that guy to be Windy.

                            Not just windy.

                            Unfortunately, Guyana gave up five goals in twenty minutes to Mexico on Friday in a World Cup qualifier. They really should work on their football is what they should do. They'll stay awake longer.
                            I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by PhilipLaos View Post
                              No bases in.

                              That's only in the British form of baseball - rounders.

                              But that's only played by girls so I'm not well up on it.


                              Philip
                              So it would be fair to say that "rounders" is popular not only with Scots, but with the Quentin Crisp/Oscar Wilde/David Bowie crowd, as well.

                              In other words, with both British genders.

                              Rimshot
                              I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

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