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College Football and TV: Which is the cart and the horse?

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  • BigDog
    replied
    Originally posted by rebpreacher View Post
    Okay, I have a question about this whole subject. Is this non-conference time or did Texas A&M join the SEC?
    Missouri and Texas A & M have joined the SEC. Missouri is in the Eastern division and Texas A & M is in the West.

    Leave a comment:


  • rebpreacher
    replied
    Okay, I have a question about this whole subject. Is this non-conference time or did Texas A&M join the SEC?

    Leave a comment:


  • john boland
    replied
    I will agree the on line aspect makes it easier to wager thus a convenience aspect can be found and that the internet was not the origion of the sin, but the bad publicity of gambling is what gives the college football world a shady side. I think when gambling began to be electronic it just opened up so many more avenues of deceit for all involved. The old fashioned senario of two guys at the VFW betting on the Army Navy Game back years ago just seems more gentlemanly to me than the high speed world of off shore on line gambling of today's society. I have tried it and I have lost more money online than if I had in participated in the older methods. The gambling scandals did indeed exist pre computer gambling as greed and the idea of an easy buck always excites the human psyche.

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  • D1J1
    replied
    Originally posted by john boland View Post
    The rise of on line gambling has just about took all the intergrity out of the game from my POV. Years ago it might have just been the parlay card from the guy at work or a friendly wager with a relative, but now billions are wagered every year through the internet. When that much money is on the line, too many things seems to mysteriously happen each week for the individual to win on a consistent basis to make a profit. I am Dan Jenkins referee for the upcoming big game between Notre Dame and Michigan. Mr. King, a Michigan Alumni, wants to take me to the Red Lobster for dinner. I go to dinner with Mr. King and as he asks for the bill from the waiter, he places an envelope on the table with $$$ in it for my taking if a certain holding call will be flagged at the beginning of the fourth quarter. Nobody notices me take the money as the waiter is now gone to get change and the holding call it in the works. The above is just an example but I have even known officials who have been approached to make sure South Carolina covers the 3 points vs Navy. As Big Dan said in O Brother Where Art Though, "It's all about the money boys."
    Everything you say can happen. But you are as wrong as wrong can be to link it to the advent of on-line gambling. That stuff has been around for much, much longer.

    The Pittsburgh papers ran a lengthy series on gambling while I was an undergraduate student in the very early 70s. At that time bookies verified million dollar handles each week on individual HIGH SCHOOL games in the area. That is per game, not as a group and in the early 70s.

    Look at all the fixing that went on in college hoops well before the internet, as well as things like the Black Sox and frequent rumblings about all the other pro-sports in at least individual games. I've been hearing about that stuff on a regular basis for 50 years now.

    Yes, the internet has tremendously intensified some problems, but I do not for a moment think gambling is one of them. The impact of the internet there is marginal at best. It is a convenience, not an initiator.

    Best regards,
    Dennis

    Leave a comment:


  • john boland
    replied
    The rise of on line gambling has just about took all the intergrity out of the game from my POV. Years ago it might have just been the parlay card from the guy at work or a friendly wager with a relative, but now billions are wagered every year through the internet. When that much money is on the line, too many things seems to mysteriously happen each week for the individual to win on a consistent basis to make a profit. I am Dan Jenkins referee for the upcoming big game between Notre Dame and Michigan. Mr. King, a Michigan Alumni, wants to take me to the Red Lobster for dinner. I go to dinner with Mr. King and as he asks for the bill from the waiter, he places an envelope on the table with $$$ in it for my taking if a certain holding call will be flagged at the beginning of the fourth quarter. Nobody notices me take the money as the waiter is now gone to get change and the holding call it in the works. The above is just an example but I have even known officials who have been approached to make sure South Carolina covers the 3 points vs Navy. As Big Dan said in O Brother Where Art Though, "It's all about the money boys."

    Leave a comment:


  • R. Evans
    replied
    Originally posted by D1J1 View Post
    You're showing excellent judgement today! Now if we could only help you get rid of that ridiculous infatuation with the Browns!

    Best regards,
    Dennis
    Never!!

    Leave a comment:


  • D1J1
    replied
    Originally posted by R. Evans View Post
    I can agree with that. Schools first, networks second and trailing in at third, the fans.
    You're showing excellent judgement today! Now if we could only help you get rid of that ridiculous infatuation with the Browns!

    Best regards,
    Dennis

    Leave a comment:


  • R. Evans
    replied
    Originally posted by D1J1 View Post
    Bob, your point that the schools, networks and fans all play a role is correct. But like a car this vehicle known as big time college athletics only has one steering wheel. The money goes to the schools and their organization, the NCAA. I don't see them saying lets cut back on athletics and focus on education. Nor do I see them saying enough is enough with the money already.

    They just act like an auctioneer and watch the bids climb. The schools are the biggest actors here.

    Regards,
    Dennis
    I can agree with that. Schools first, networks second and trailing in at third, the fans.

    Leave a comment:


  • D1J1
    replied
    Originally posted by R. Evans View Post
    I'd put it on the schools and the networks equally. ESPN, for better or worse, changed the face of sports by getting more and more TV rights for college games, stimulating NBC, Fox and CBS to do the same. ABC and ESPN are just about interchangeable when it comes to CFB. And the schools realized that massive amounts of money could be made by making the networks pay.


    To illustrate the difference in the way it is against the way it was:

    When I was a kid and even into my late 20s, I got to see Ohio State on TV maybe 2 or 3 times a year. Usually an out of conference game against a "name" school, and the Michigan game. With maybe another conference game in between. That was it. For the rest of them, it was either the radio or get the paper on Sunday morning. And I was satisfied with that. It made an OSU game on TV an event not to be missed.

    Now I can see every game. Even the ones against powder-puff non-conference opponents. And just yesterday, until the last minute, the Big Ten Network was going to be pulled off Dish Network.(we have Dish) A last minute agreement has kept it on for now. I was seriously pissed that I might miss OSU vs. Miami, OH.(I need help) Calling Dish, threatening to cancel,...etc. (although there are other issues besides this one) It's now a drug and I need my 12 week fix of OSU games.

    So maybe, us fans are part of the problem as well. Demanding to see our favorite teams on TV no matter who they're playing. Networks wouldn't shell out huge dollars if no one was watching.
    Bob, your point that the schools, networks and fans all play a role is correct. But like a car this vehicle known as big time college athletics only has one steering wheel. The money goes to the schools and their organization, the NCAA. I don't see them saying lets cut back on athletics and focus on education. Nor do I see them saying enough is enough with the money already.

    They just act like an auctioneer and watch the bids climb. The schools are the biggest actors here.

    Regards,
    Dennis

    Leave a comment:


  • Naffenea
    replied
    I watched the Nebraska - Southern Mississippi game yesterday and was amazed at how they could fill the stadium, and do it game after game, year after year. I come from USU where a half empty stadium is a packed game. So I'll give the nod to the schools for driving the TV cart.

    Leave a comment:


  • R. Evans
    replied
    I'd put it on the schools and the networks equally. ESPN, for better or worse, changed the face of sports by getting more and more TV rights for college games, stimulating NBC, Fox and CBS to do the same. ABC and ESPN are just about interchangeable when it comes to CFB. And the schools realized that massive amounts of money could be made by making the networks pay.


    To illustrate the difference in the way it is against the way it was:

    When I was a kid and even into my late 20s, I got to see Ohio State on TV maybe 2 or 3 times a year. Usually an out of conference game against a "name" school, and the Michigan game. With maybe another conference game in between. That was it. For the rest of them, it was either the radio or get the paper on Sunday morning. And I was satisfied with that. It made an OSU game on TV an event not to be missed.

    Now I can see every game. Even the ones against powder-puff non-conference opponents. And just yesterday, until the last minute, the Big Ten Network was going to be pulled off Dish Network.(we have Dish) A last minute agreement has kept it on for now. I was seriously pissed that I might miss OSU vs. Miami, OH.(I need help) Calling Dish, threatening to cancel,...etc. (although there are other issues besides this one) It's now a drug and I need my 12 week fix of OSU games.

    So maybe, us fans are part of the problem as well. Demanding to see our favorite teams on TV no matter who they're playing. Networks wouldn't shell out huge dollars if no one was watching.

    Leave a comment:


  • D1J1
    replied
    Originally posted by Sgt. Rock View Post
    I'd say the schools drive it. Look at NBC and Notre Dame, and the fact the Texas got their own channel. The reason most SEC schools get all of their games televised is that their fans will watch them.
    Same thing with basketball.
    Schools like Kansas, Kentucky, UNC and Duke are always televised even when they don't seem to be playing other big name schools. Their fans will watch them and people like to watch schools like that on national tv.
    I tend to agree. The networks are easy targets as they seem to be lavishing all this money on schools, conferences and the NCAA. What we don't see is the negotiations where the schools are demanding this money! The greed, corruption and lack of ethics in big-time college athletics lies with the schools.

    Regards,
    Dennis

    Leave a comment:


  • Sgt. Rock
    replied
    I'd say the schools drive it. Look at NBC and Notre Dame, and the fact the Texas got their own channel. The reason most SEC schools get all of their games televised is that their fans will watch them.
    Same thing with basketball.
    Schools like Kansas, Kentucky, UNC and Duke are always televised even when they don't seem to be playing other big name schools. Their fans will watch them and people like to watch schools like that on national tv.

    Leave a comment:


  • D1J1
    replied
    Whining about broadcasters showing favoritism is universal. But which is the engine pulling the train? Is it the networks, schools, the NCAA or is it some kind of masochistic symbiotic relationship?

    Regards,
    Dennis

    Leave a comment:


  • rebpreacher
    replied
    I've heard many times they'd be glowing and in the next breath bomb them. And if they played Bama. Forget it. Bama could do no wrong.

    Leave a comment:

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