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  • Slim
    replied
    I hunt only for food except for yotes and other pest control.

    I love elk hunting(about the only thing I hunt anymore) . Back injury has forced me to abandon hunting on foot. I like to go on horseback I have harvested them with a .308 Win and .375 H&H. Meat is fabulous.

    Turkey and Ringnecks- harvested with 12 guage. Again very good

    I have shot Nilgai in India- again excellent meat. Used a.375 H&H and 30-06

    Shoot Jack rabits with .22 Lr and .22 wmr

    Wild boar with .308 win again good meat.

    Shot a few Whitetails in my younger days meat varies a lot from very gamey to quite good. I don't shoot them anymore.

    Although I have never shot a black bear I have been on hunts with friends and eaten them in the Eastern United States.. Bear Liver and onions is some of the best I have ever eaten. Also the t-bone version of black bear is very good.

    I hunted a lot during my younger days. Nowadays I target shoot more than I hunt. Back injury and a very persuasive wife limit my choices.
    Last edited by Slim; 15 Sep 13, 00:54.

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  • Selous
    replied
    Originally posted by slick_miester View Post
    Forgive me. I'm using "hide" as any position affording an observer/shooter good concealment over an extended period of time. Such a hide may be constructed with materials carried by the shooter/observer, or it may be a naturally occurring "loop" in a bush. I prefer natural hides whenever possible, since it saves me from having to haul extra sh*t. Upstate New York is rather well-wooded, so finding natural hides is normally no problem. Besides, a buck's primary threat detection devices are his nose and ears, not his eyes, so as long as you don't "skylight" yourself or jump around like an epileptic, you should remain visually undetected.

    Ah, I think you get my confusion indeed ; I visited a family in the Mid West, the father who hunted deer, he owned farm land, or rather, land in a farming area,(which must be most of the region!) but it was mostly wooded and here he had constructed a number of high 'hides' to shoot deer from out of wooden palets and even old telegraph poles- I was mistakenly believing you had a similar thing going on.

    How dull. It's the tracking that's the real challenge: effecting the kill is merely a procedure.

    Perfect hunting weather.
    Enitrely agree, but that's the type of people who can mostly afford to do the hunting there. Just so they can 'say they've done it' kind of thing. Parts of my extended family in Southern Africa are in the tourism and game sport biznai and they say the same is true for many of their clients who are not very good for hunting and just want that photo at the end. Which is foolishness when you consider the cost of licences(Or rather, the whole package including accomodation etc) ; enjoy the hunt whilst it lasts.

    British sports hunters are very thin on the ground these days compared to a few years back so I bet their best customers in the highlands are from elsewhere such as US.

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  • slick_miester
    replied
    Originally posted by Selous View Post
    Very similar, but without the hides to my knowledge; though some may use hides I've not seen it done and you'd be more like to take your shot from behind a clump of scrub, or rocks, or from up a hillside, again keeping low, so more stealthy movement than stealthy waiting.
    Forgive me. I'm using "hide" as any position affording an observer/shooter good concealment over an extended period of time. Such a hide may be constructed with materials carried by the shooter/observer, or it may be a naturally occurring "loop" in a bush. I prefer natural hides whenever possible, since it saves me from having to haul extra sh*t. Upstate New York is rather well-wooded, so finding natural hides is normally no problem. Besides, a buck's primary threat detection devices are his nose and ears, not his eyes, so as long as you don't "skylight" yourself or jump around like an epileptic, you should remain visually undetected.

    Originally posted by Selous View Post
    The tracking is carried out by the guide as usually the people doing the hunting and paying the licence are rich dentists and...lawyers...
    How dull. It's the tracking that's the real challenge: effecting the kill is merely a procedure.

    Originally posted by Selous View Post
    Deer stalking (with rifles)as it's known to differentiate it from hunting with dogs, is pretty much seeking or tracking a small group or individual with a small group of hunters; usually just you and ghillie - or local game guide.
    Direct stalking is a real challenge, and I've done it in the past -- but it takes a sh*tload of time, and a ton of patience. Most hunters of my acquaintance won't even bother. It can be worth it, however, if you come across a particularly beautiful buck.

    Originally posted by Selous View Post
    The weather, being Scotland or Northern England I think in some cases, is par the course.
    Perfect hunting weather.

    Originally posted by Selous View Post
    Am I right that there are, in the US, side-arms with large calibur, for use for hunters who run into bears? I was once in a Cabellas in Minnesota and many of the 'hunting pistols' were firing rounds I'd normally expect to see the bore of in hefty rifles.
    Even among NY-based outdoorsmen there are plenty of S&W M29's and Colt Pythons in .44 Magnum in circulation. Summer campers, fishermen, and other outdoorsmen will carry such revolvers, but for fall hunters it would be redundant.

    Now that I think about it, I've probably been lucky, as I've never carried a sidearm when enjoying the outdoors. The closest thing I own to an appropriate weapon is a Kimber 1911 Commander. That wouldn't cut it against a 500lb black bear, would it.

    Originally posted by llkinak
    There are a few very irresponsible people up here when it comes to being bear aware.
    Let's hope so, otherwise there'd be fewer Alaskans.

    Originally posted by llkinak
    Remember this though, Alaska has only about 650,000 people and about half of those live in Anchorage. (Where they still have a bear problem on occasion) In the Mat Su Valley where I live there are about 82,000 people in an area of about 24,000 square miles, and most of that population is concentrated in the core Palmer / Wasilla area. Alaska is huge, and largely unpopulated, so bear still do prety well up here.
    The more densely populated an area is, the more hunting is restricted. Naturally hunting is banned outright within the borders of NYC. Suffolk Co has banned all rifled arms, including pistols: one can hunt only with a bow or a smoothbore in The City's eastern suburb. I'm guessing up by you -- in the US' least densely populated state -- one need not fear too much missing, and plopping some poor schlub in the ass 1,500 yds downrange. Don't laugh: that kind of thing happens here every couple of years. It shouldn't, but it does.

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  • llkinak
    replied
    Indeed, such should be the way with all hunting I believe. Am I right that there are, in the US, side-arms with large calibur, for use for hunters who run into bears? I was once in a Cabellas in Minnesota and many of the 'hunting pistols' were firing rounds I'd normally expect to see the bore of in hefty rifles.
    Many hunters cary sidearms while in the bush. Calibers range from relatively small, like .357, to very substantial, like .454 casull. The majority in my local area tend towards .44 magnum revolvers.

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  • Selous
    replied
    Originally posted by slick_miester View Post
    My favored method was picking up a deer trail, following it to a water source, and then establishing a hide overlooking said source. I preferred the crappiest weather, especially rain, as it both muffled noise, and washed away scent. Doing it that way consumed two days, sometimes more, but it was reasonably effective, especially since I never went out with a large party, usually just one other hunter.

    Is that how they do it in Scotland?
    Very similar, but without the hides to my knowledge; though some may use hides I've not seen it done and you'd be more like to take your shot from behind a clump of scrub, or rocks, or from up a hillside, again keeping low, so more stealthy movement than stealthy waiting. The tracking is carried out by the guide as usually the people doing the hunting and paying the licence are rich dentists and...lawyers...

    Deer stalking (with rifles)as it's known to differentiate it from hunting with dogs, is pretty much seeking or tracking a small group or individual with a small group of hunters; usually just you and ghillie - or local game guide. The weather, being Scotland or Northern England I think in some cases, is par the course. Red, Roe, Falloe are the deer hunted. Usually this is for both sport - antler trophies, and meat/venison.

    I know that bow hunting is a rarety, I've not seen bows at game fairs or in use, and yet I'm fairly sure they'd be one of the few weapons one could own in this place.


    Come late November, if they're out, they're pretty hungry, and pretty mean. That's why I prefer .30-06 over .30-30: I want that brute down in one shot.

    While ranges are rather on the short side, normally no more than 200yds, a scope is nevertheless recommended: you want to drop the animal with one shot, and not let him suffer.
    Indeed, such should be the way with all hunting I believe. Am I right that there are, in the US, side-arms with large calibur, for use for hunters who run into bears? I was once in a Cabellas in Minnesota and many of the 'hunting pistols' were firing rounds I'd normally expect to see the bore of in hefty rifles.

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  • slick_miester
    replied
    Originally posted by Selous View Post
    Well I never suggested the prone position.

    I'd expect it to be a lot like hunting deer in the Highlands, for a comparison.
    My favored method was picking up a deer trail, following it to a water source, and then establishing a hide overlooking said source. I preferred the crappiest weather, especially rain, as it both muffled noise, and washed away scent. Doing it that way consumed two days, sometimes more, but it was reasonably effective, especially since I never went out with a large party, usually just one other hunter.



    Is that how they do it in Scotland?

    In recent years the white tails have gotten more and more ballsy, often venturing within small towns, and of course, across roads and highways.



    But watch out for these guys.



    Come late November, if they're out, they're pretty hungry, and pretty mean. That's why I prefer .30-06 over .30-30: I want that brute down in one shot.

    While ranges are rather on the short side, normally no more than 200yds, a scope is nevertheless recommended: you want to drop the animal with one shot, and not let him suffer.

    Leave a comment:


  • rebpreacher
    replied
    I'll share some recipes. MAYBE I'm picky. Yes bear smells,that is what the cocola is for,it takes the smell out. Mine was black bear,not brown. And It was before the greasy time.

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  • Selous
    replied
    Yeah, shooting a bow from the prone position can be a real bitch.
    Well I never suggested the prone position.

    I'd expect it to be a lot like hunting deer in the Highlands, for a comparison.

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  • llkinak
    replied
    Originally posted by slick_miester View Post
    - emphasis mine

    Three a year? No .
    http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/static/re...pdfs/gmu14.pdf

    This is just 14a and 14b. Unit 20, another popular area, has the same limits. Crazy, I know.

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  • llkinak
    replied
    Originally posted by slick_miester View Post
    - emphasis mine

    Three a year? No . I know that Alaska ain't New York, but damn! You guys must be crawling with 'em. What do you do, just dump all of your trash on the side of the road or something?
    There are a few very irresponsible people up here when it comes to being bear aware. Remember this though, Alaska has only about 650,000 people and about half of those live in Anchorage. (Where they still have a bear problem on occasion) In the Mat Su Valley where I live there are about 82,000 people in an area of about 24,000 square miles, and most of that population is concentrated in the core Palmer / Wasilla area. Alaska is huge, and largely unpopulated, so bear still do prety well up here.

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  • slick_miester
    replied
    Originally posted by llkinak View Post
    Black bear are getting to be something akin to land pike up here, however, and some places have a three bear limit per year with no closed season. They are getting very thick on the ground.
    - emphasis mine

    Three a year? No . I know that Alaska ain't New York, but damn! You guys must be crawling with 'em. What do you do, just dump all of your trash on the side of the road or something?

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  • llkinak
    replied
    I'll hit up Kirk or Lance for one of their recipes.
    I let the professionals make the sausage, Alaska Sausage and Indian Valley Meats do a very good job but I'm not sure what they put in it. As fars as other stuff goes, I avoid bear roast and steaks, too...blech, for my taste. Burger works pretty good in spagetti sauce or other similar dishes. Chunked up meat for savory stews with lots of garlic and pepper or curried with plenty of cover up veggies. As far as I'm concerned there's nothing you can do for brown bear to make it palatable. Hell, just being around one when someone else is skinning it smells terrible.

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  • slick_miester
    replied
    Originally posted by Selous View Post
    appear mountainous, so no trees so I bet that involves a lot of ducking behidn rocks and stalking?
    Yeah, shooting a bow from the prone position can be a real bitch.

    Originally posted by Selous View Post
    Presumably, like the Black Bear, the mountain Lion or cougar can be a pest?
    I've heard that there have been some unpleasant mountain lion - human encounters in Northern California, but beyond that I cannot say. I know that as there's been more development in heretofore undeveloped areas, there have been more black bear - human encounters, including a couple of human fatalities. Of course, the situation is exacerbated by assholes who won't do the right thing vis a vis their food and garbage, like closing lids and keeping it out of reach of the bears. As bears become more acclimated to humans, they become more, not less dangerous. These morons are generating risks for everyone.

    Originally posted by Selous View Post
    are these licence huntable or, like bear, have a season or are they only dealt with by officials in culls?
    Both New York and New Jersey offer numerous licenses for hunting and fishing, depending on game, weapon, region, etc, etc.

    Originally posted by Selous View Post
    If I'm ever in New Jersey, maybe best not to shoot, I'd not want to accidently hit a lawyer or a cow or something!...I think there was a song about that...
    If you just happen to hit a lawyer, I won't see anything. I promise.

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  • llkinak
    replied
    Originally posted by Selous View Post
    llkinak, that is one impressive looking bow!
    These Dahl Sheep; appear mountainous, so no trees so I bet that involves a lot of ducking behidn rocks and stalking?

    Presumably, like the Black Bear, the mountain Lion or cougar can be a pest? are these licence huntable or, like bear, have a season or are they only dealt with by officials in culls?
    Thanks, she's a wonderful tool. Regarding the sheep, they do tend to stay pretty high up. They have patterns like most other hoofed critters, and your best chance is to watch and learn where and when they bed down. If you can get there and wait for them to come back from feeding for the day you have a decent chance. Sneaking up on them is a non-starter, they're too in tune with the surroundings and usually a ram or two is acting as a sort of sentry. You can also try to stake out a perferred watering spot and wait, but getting them where they sleep is probably the best bet.

    I've never hunted mountain lion and so have no idea about seasons for them, if any. I don't eat much bear either, like I said, never brownies and black ones only in the spring. Black bear are getting to be something akin to land pike up here, however, and some places have a three bear limit per year with no closed season. They are getting very thick on the ground.

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  • Selous
    replied
    Thanks for the replies gents, that's cleared my ponderings up.
    I don't think I'd eat bear black or brown...though I suppose it's an experience from what I get from your posts. I really do appreciate your words of wisdom on all this, believe me.

    llkinak, that is one impressive looking bow!
    These Dahl Sheep; appear mountainous, so no trees so I bet that involves a lot of ducking behidn rocks and stalking?

    Presumably, like the Black Bear, the mountain Lion or cougar can be a pest? are these licence huntable or, like bear, have a season or are they only dealt with by officials in culls?

    If I'm ever in New Jersey, maybe best not to shoot, I'd not want to accidently hit a lawyer or a cow or something!...I think there was a song about that...

    Leave a comment:

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