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What is the Greatest Curry Ever?

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  • #16
    Best Punjabi: Haveli

    Best Begali: Ghandi

    Best Traditional Thai: Simply Thai

    Best Fusion Thai: Q Thai

    Bon appetit.
    I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

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    • #17
      There was a time when I would have recommended beef vindaloo but as I've aged I've found some problems with the very hottest curries. Nowadays I would recommend people to look to Sri Lankan curries as they tend to include ginger which makes it a lot kinder to your insides.
      The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants. Thomas Jefferson.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by walker View Post
        Actually, I have to say I have never had a decent curry outside of the UK.
        I had one in France that was disgusting. The continent doesnt seem to share our fondness for a good curry, and I don't know why.

        I havent been to India though.
        I've had good Indonesian curry ; I would expect you'd find it in the Netherlands.
        The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants. Thomas Jefferson.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Cosmos View Post
          There was a time when I would have recommended beef vindaloo but as I've aged I've found some problems with the very hottest curries. Nowadays I would recommend people to look to Sri Lankan curries as they tend to include ginger which makes it a lot kinder to your insides.
          I remember Vindaloo when it was the hotest dish on an Indian resturants menu .

          The following not directed at anyone particular .

          Vindaloo is a Goan-Portugese dish, meaning garlic and vinegar, and does not need to be hot. It was usually a fish curry as well, although if you do find a beef version, you will probably be from a Pakistani restaurant as most Indians are Hindus and don't eat cow.

          My curry's tend to be pseudo Vindaloos anyway, since I prefer Port as my cooking booze, as it keeps. Garlic is in almost all my savoury dishes, and ginger and chilis tend to be in equal amount to the garlic in my 'Eastern' items.

          Originally posted by Nick the Noodle View Post
          Death by Curry

          Take a whole chicken on the bone, rub over with a little stirfry oil, and dust with a decent mild curry powder. Roast in a covered stew pot for 20 minutes a pound plus an extra 20 minutes at 150 degrees C. Allow to cool, discard the skin, and shred the meat into mouth sized pieces.

          In a wok, gently fry 2 onions, a whole bulb of garlic minced, and ginger equal in size to the garlic, along with as many fresh and different chilies as you can cope with. I use the fat that came from the roasted chicken to do this for extra taste. Keep seeds and membrane on for extra heat. After about 2 minutes or so, add a teaspoon of hot chili powder, 1 teaspoon of mild chili powder, 1 teaspoon of cayenne powder and 1 of paprika, along with 2 teaspoons of garam massala, 2 of madras powder, and 4 of a mild curry powder. You use a mild curry powder, as hot ones tend to bulk out their ingredients with chili and salt, leaving less room for spices such as fenugreek and coriander. You also use different chili powders to broaden the complexity of the dish. After 10 minutes, add the chicken, and raise the heat. Add flour to make a rue with the fat in the pan and add port to make a rue. Then put mixture back into your stock pot and slowly cover the chicken with veg or chicken stock, stiring to make sure the sauce is not lumpy. If you need to season the dish at this point, salt is present in curry powders, add worcester sauce rather than salt, or even soya sauce. Once covered with liquid, add lid to pot, and put in an oven at about 100 degrees C for at least 12 hours. Check liquid levels to make sure meat remains just covered. An hour before serving remove the lid while cooking to thicken the sauce. Then eat with rice, naan bread or whatever takes your fancy eg half and half.

          It is not actually a lot of work. A few minutes shredding the chicken and the time cooking with the wok is the only real time actually doing any real work, 15 minutes tops. If you have chicken pieces, you could always marinate the meat first in buttermilk and a chili sauce first.

          1 Refrigerated loo roll (2 for the larger person) may be required .
          I made a variation on this dish yesteday for my missus and I. I cooked the chicken on bed of chopped two red onions and several stalks of celery, about half and half. I removed the chicken to cool, and added some flour to make a rue. Then I added Port to deglaze the pan, and then added the spices and fresh chilies.

          Missus was impressed with the Vindaloo variation which is all that really matters .
          How to Talk to a Climate Skeptic: http://grist.org/series/skeptics/
          Global Warming & Climate Change Myths: https://www.skepticalscience.com/argument.php

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