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What is the Greatest Curry Ever?

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  • What is the Greatest Curry Ever?

    Miss read a thread earlier and mistook country for curry so thought why not.
    (again new here so if its been covered before sorry, did search)

    What is the greatest curry ever or where is the best place you are likely to find a great curry?

    I like many on these islands love curry and still like to eat in or out at local restaurants but what the ‘best’ one or where would you go to get the best as everyone’s ‘best’ is likely to be a different dish.

    Lived in Cardiff for many years and our favourite restaurant was the Juboraj in Rhiwbina.
    Must have been good because one night a friend was enjoying a meal enjoying a meal in there two groups came in and sat on separate tables. One was for John Major, the then Prime Minister, and I presume his staff and the other for his guards. Was later told that he was travelling back from a meeting in the ‘Welsh Office’ and wanted to eat, unofficially, so the staff at the 'Welsh Office' had to find the best curry in Cardiff.

    Been in there myself and often seen politician and ‘faces’
    It has been a few years since I left Cardiff and the owner has expanded from the original one to several more, whether that has affected quality? Cannot answer.

    We always had Chicken Rogon Josh, Lamb Bhuna and Chicken Shashlick with a Bombay Aloo!UUUMMMMM!

    http://www.juborajgroup.com/rhiwbina.html
    Cymru am Byth

  • #2
    Bombay Club in DC.

    http://www.bombayclubdc.com/bombayclub.html

    Also had some great stuff in the West Central section of London unfortunately I don't remember the name.
    "Ask not what your country can do for you"

    Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

    you’re entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

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    • #3
      In the early 1980s there was a curry house in Aldershot called Johhny Gurkhas, (may still be for all I know). We all know Gurkhas are little fellas. Not these. I don't know the hows or whys but these were all six footers and mean looking with it. As far as the service went you got a bowl of curry bought to your table. That was it. No smiles or please and thank yous. This bowl of curry cost £3. Even in those days that was nothing. And it was sensational! The place was always packed out and you were lucky to get a table. I've tasted nothing like it since. But the quest goes on.

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      • #4
        Only problem is that not everyone's been to too many Thai/Indian restaurants except maybe in their area...so they'll say a place in their area.

        But personally I've been to 3 Thai restaurants and an Indian restaurant, and they're both different. I liked the Thai better because it had more in it.

        I like the yellow curry at this Thai place in Ridgecrest
        "A foolish man thinks he knows everything if placed in unexpected difficulty; but he knows not what to answer, if to the test he is put."

        --Hávamál

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        • #5
          Only problem is that not everyone's been to too many Thai/Indian restaurants except maybe in their area...so they'll say a place in their area.

          Say what????

          My own area? Surly you jest.

          DC to London to Germany
          "Ask not what your country can do for you"

          Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

          you’re entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

          Comment


          • #6
            I am not a fan of hot chilli so I can't eat curries because all i can taste is my tounge being burnt to hell. But I guess Marshmarn Beef is very nice dunno if thats a curry or not? and I guess only place I have had it was at the Thai resturaunt just up the road from my place.
            http://g.bf3stats.com/pc/1LP76r6C/melba_101.png

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            • #7
              Originally posted by 150935 View Post
              I am not a fan of hot chilli so I can't eat curries because all i can taste is my tounge being burnt to hell. But I guess Marshmarn Beef is very nice dunno if thats a curry or not? and I guess only place I have had it was at the Thai resturaunt just up the road from my place.
              Well I don't like spicy hot just to burn myself, but like the balance and the sensation after the initial burn. Like a lot of things it's a matter of habit, once <ou get used to heart you'll be able to taste other things and appreciate how much it can add.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by joea View Post
                Well I don't like spicy hot just to burn myself, but like the balance and the sensation after the initial burn. Like a lot of things it's a matter of habit, once <ou get used to heart you'll be able to taste other things and appreciate how much it can add.
                How do u taste if your tounge is burnt lol or is that just me?
                http://g.bf3stats.com/pc/1LP76r6C/melba_101.png

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                • #9
                  My favourite is always the Vegetable dopiaza, I had an amazing one on a very bad hangover in an Indian on the Curry Mile in Rusholme, Manchester.

                  Then again I did once have the most delicious aubergine fritters in a place in Glasgow.

                  I've heard Brick Lane, known for a while to be the curry centre of Britain has been going downhill recently, but I guess this is often the case as places become more gentrified and less 'authentic'.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Half Pint John View Post
                    Say what????

                    My own area? Surly you jest.

                    DC to London to Germany
                    Surely you forgot to read
                    NOT EVERYONE
                    "A foolish man thinks he knows everything if placed in unexpected difficulty; but he knows not what to answer, if to the test he is put."

                    --Hávamál

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                    • #11
                      Actually, I have to say I have never had a decent curry outside of the UK.
                      I had one in France that was disgusting. The continent doesnt seem to share our fondness for a good curry, and I don't know why.

                      I havent been to India though.

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                      • #12
                        Lemon curry.

                        ALL LIVES SPLATTER!

                        BLACK JEEPS MATTER!

                        BLACK MOTORCYCLES MATTER!

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                        • #13
                          I've recently tried a Hong Kong style curry beef stew that was excellent. It was the best curry dish I've ever tasted, and I've eaten many.

                          I highly recommend this dish for anyone who likes curry.


                          "Stand for the flag ~ Kneel for the fallen"

                          "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer." ~ Bruce Lee

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                          • #14
                            Death by Curry

                            Take a whole chicken on the bone, rub over with a little stirfry oil, and dust with a decent mild curry powder. Roast in a covered stew pot for 20 minutes a pound plus an extra 20 minutes at 150 degrees C. Allow to cool, discard the skin, and shred the meat into mouth sized pieces.

                            In a wok, gently fry 2 onions, a whole bulb of garlic minced, and ginger equal in size to the garlic, along with as many fresh and different chilies as you can cope with. I use the fat that came from the roasted chicken to do this for extra taste. Keep seeds and membrane on for extra heat. After about 2 minutes or so, add a teaspoon of hot chili powder, 1 teaspoon of mild chili powder, 1 teaspoon of cayenne powder and 1 of paprika, along with 2 teaspoons of garam massala, 2 of madras powder, and 4 of a mild curry powder. You use a mild curry powder, as hot ones tend to bulk out their ingredients with chili and salt, leaving less room for spices such as fenugreek and coriander. You also use different chili powders to broaden the complexity of the dish. After 10 minutes, add the chicken, and raise the heat. Add flour to make a rue with the fat in the pan and add port to make a rue. Then put mixture back into your stock pot and slowly cover the chicken with veg or chicken stock, stiring to make sure the sauce is not lumpy. If you need to season the dish at this point, salt is present in curry powders, add worcester sauce rather than salt, or even soya sauce. Once covered with liquid, add lid to pot, and put in an oven at about 100 degrees C for at least 12 hours. Check liquid levels to make sure meat remains just covered. An hour before serving remove the lid while cooking to thicken the sauce. Then eat with rice, naan bread or whatever takes your fancy eg half and half.

                            It is not actually a lot of work. A few minutes shredding the chicken and the time cooking with the wok is the only real time actually doing any real work, 15 minutes tops. If you have chicken pieces, you could always marinate the meat first in buttermilk and a chili sauce first.

                            1 Refrigerated loo roll (2 for the larger person) may be required .
                            How to Talk to a Climate Skeptic: http://grist.org/series/skeptics/
                            Global Warming & Climate Change Myths: https://www.skepticalscience.com/argument.php

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                            • #15
                              Great little family-run Thai place not far from me, but oooweee, not for the faint of heart, or unlined asbestos *******. Wow. Best to settle for the kid's version first and work your way up progressively and with all due care.
                              Youthful Exuberance Is No Match For Old Age And Treachery.

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