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  • Just as an intoduction

    Fellow culinarians,

    I have recently signed the roster but had not gotten thru all the various forums to see what's in them.

    I am estatic to find this one. I make 2 pies per week and personally consumed at least 50 in the last 12 months. I do other things in the kitchen too but regular pies are my therapy.

    I will read thru all of the previous pages of post as time allows.

    Steve
    www.writersamuseme.com/stevepark.htm#878116944

  • #2
    What sort of pies, pies can be many things.
    Not lip service, nor obsequious homage to superiors, nor servile observance of forms and customs...the Australian army is proof that individualism is the best and not the worst foundation upon which to build up collective discipline - General Monash

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    • #3
      Welcome to our freak show Steve .
      SPORTS FREAK/ PANZERBLITZ COMMANDER/ CC2 COMMANDER

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Temujin View Post
        What sort of pies, pies can be many things.
        First, thanks Dgfred.

        Temujin, I do sweet, dessert pies: lemon meringue, choc. meringue, coconut and egg custards occasionally, and sweet filled fried pies but will eventually do savory.

        I bought a hand crank pasta machine a few weeks ago and expect to do some ravioli, etc. soon.

        We also eat lots of soups in the winter - leek and potato tonight.

        Steve ( I know, it's more than you asked about)
        www.writersamuseme.com/stevepark.htm#878116944

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        • #5
          Originally posted by steve park View Post
          ...................and sweet filled fried pies................
          Fried Pie ! Tell me more!
          How to Talk to a Climate Skeptic: http://grist.org/series/skeptics/
          Global Warming & Climate Change Myths: https://www.skepticalscience.com/argument.php

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          • #6
            Sounds good! We have a section in the Barracks known as the Mess Hall. Make yourself at home.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Biscuit
              We have a section in the Barracks known as the Mess Hall.


              Welcome aboard, mate...

              And to the Mess Hall!


              On the Plains of Hesitation lie the blackened bones of countless millions who, at the dawn of victory, sat down to rest-and resting... died. Adlai E. Stevenson

              ACG History Today

              BoRG

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              • #8
                Originally posted by steve park View Post
                First, thanks Dgfred.

                Temujin, I do sweet, dessert pies: lemon meringue, choc. meringue, coconut and egg custards occasionally, and sweet filled fried pies but will eventually do savory.

                I bought a hand crank pasta machine a few weeks ago and expect to do some ravioli, etc. soon.

                We also eat lots of soups in the winter - leek and potato tonight.

                Steve ( I know, it's more than you asked about)
                Now I'm wishing I would live in Northern South Carolina.
                Wellcome aboard mate.
                All warfare is based on deception.
                Sun Tzu - Art of war - Chapter One - Laying Plans


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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Nick the Noodle View Post
                  Fried Pie ! Tell me more!
                  Nick, I realize there is an internatioal flavor to this forum so I will try to explain things in an understandable way.

                  I live in the Southeastern US and grew up with regional foods that I still love but fried pies are world known by other names. I think the UK would call them pocket pies, a half-moon shape filled with whatever you like in them. Here, it is mostly cooked fruits: apples, peaches, apricots, etc.

                  They are made with a dough similar to pastry dough but with eggs and milk, cut into 3-4 inch circles (75-100mm), filled, folded, and fried in a skillet of hot oil (I use peanut oil). I would be happy to provide the basic recipe if you would like. I made some this week with a small biscuit cutter and did them like ravioli with chocolate and pastry creme fillings. Steve
                  www.writersamuseme.com/stevepark.htm#878116944

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by steve park View Post
                    Nick, I realize there is an internatioal flavor to this forum so I will try to explain things in an understandable way.

                    I live in the Southeastern US and grew up with regional foods that I still love but fried pies are world known by other names. I think the UK would call them pocket pies, a half-moon shape filled with whatever you like in them. Here, it is mostly cooked fruits: apples, peaches, apricots, etc.

                    They are made with a dough similar to pastry dough but with eggs and milk, cut into 3-4 inch circles (75-100mm), filled, folded, and fried in a skillet of hot oil (I use peanut oil). I would be happy to provide the basic recipe if you would like. I made some this week with a small biscuit cutter and did them like ravioli with chocolate and pastry creme fillings. Steve
                    Louisiana! I really can't think of another state that would have fried pie!
                    How to Talk to a Climate Skeptic: http://grist.org/series/skeptics/
                    Global Warming & Climate Change Myths: https://www.skepticalscience.com/argument.php

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by steve park View Post
                      Nick, I realize there is an internatioal flavor to this forum so I will try to explain things in an understandable way.

                      I live in the Southeastern US and grew up with regional foods that I still love but fried pies are world known by other names. I think the UK would call them pocket pies, a half-moon shape filled with whatever you like in them. Here, it is mostly cooked fruits: apples, peaches, apricots, etc.

                      They are made with a dough similar to pastry dough but with eggs and milk, cut into 3-4 inch circles (75-100mm), filled, folded, and fried in a skillet of hot oil (I use peanut oil). I would be happy to provide the basic recipe if you would like. I made some this week with a small biscuit cutter and did them like ravioli with chocolate and pastry creme fillings. Steve
                      I know exactly what you are speaking of. My loving Aunt used to make those lovely delicasies for us a long time ago. God rest her soul!
                      "Profanity is but a linguistic crutch for illiterate motherbleepers"

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Nick the Noodle View Post
                        Louisiana! I really can't think of another state that would have fried pie!
                        Excellent on knowledge. The actual recipe I use for the pastry dough was in a Southern cookbook and it came from Louisiana.

                        But I grew up with them in the early 50's, in Tennessee, when my grandmother would make them. They were so soggy you almost had to hold them upside down to eat them, but so delicious. She probably made them with biscuit dough since that was a main staple.

                        They are made commercially but are basically awful, and they can be baked in the oven and become pop-overs.

                        Johnbyran, I'm with you-nothing like the memories and that was why I looked for a recipe. Steve
                        www.writersamuseme.com/stevepark.htm#878116944

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