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  • Nick the Noodle
    replied
    Originally posted by Karri View Post
    I've experimented with this occasionally, but only recently started doing it "properly". I find that it adds a complete new level of taste into soups/broths/sauces(and store bought doesn't even compare). The only thing is, it takes a lot of time. And, of course, since I am still experimenting with different stuff it means that it can go a bit off the recipe from time to time. Ie. I recently tried making a stock with some chilis, but it turned out to not have almost any spiciness anyways. Next time I went overboard with three different chilis and it resulted in too spicy soup.

    So far I've stuck to a pretty basic recipe:
    Pork meat/bones(marrow)
    Onion or two
    Celery
    A few cloves of garlic
    A piece of ginger
    Carrot(optional), I read this suck some excess fat out
    Chili
    Salt/pepper/curry/other spices, but usually I just add this when cooking the actual soup. Not sure if they make any difference in the stock.
    Water to cover it all, of course.
    Bring to boil and let simmer for 4-8 hours.

    Anyone else doing this? Any tips? Which are the best meats? I tried with a bit of fat/bone taken off sirloin and it was vastly better than the pork meat/bones combo. Also, any other vegetables to add? Maybe use whole peppercorns?
    Love your recipe.

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    We make stock quite often, or more correctly, the wife does it. Usually we use bones and meat scrapes from meals we've cooked. For example the carcass of a whole chicken for making chicken stock. Onion, celery, and carrots are classic vegetable ingredients and this all is usually simmered for most of a day, then refrigerated to make removal of most of the hardened "fat" on top easier. From there it is jarred and if enough, extra goes in the freezer for later use. We do similar with turkey bones/carcass when we have that. Chicken(and turkey) stock is the most versatile and can be used in a variety of recipes, not always poultry related.

    We will make beef and on rare occasion pork stock, using the same basic method. I sometimes make a quick shrimp stock placing the (cooked or uncooked) shells in a couple cups of water, boil a few minutes and then pour through a strainer. This is useful in many ways, I most often use it when making gumbo or jambalaya.

    Some quick web-searching produced this video from Alton Brown which I'd highly recommend for a start. I learned a couple things myself ...
    https://www.foodnetwork.com/videos/a...-stock-0239176


    Add the following into your search for a good starter on the subject of homemade stocks for cooking;
    " stock recipe alton brown "

    Leave a comment:


  • 101combatvet
    replied
    Originally posted by Karri View Post
    I've experimented with this occasionally, but only recently started doing it "properly". I find that it adds a complete new level of taste into soups/broths/sauces(and store bought doesn't even compare). The only thing is, it takes a lot of time. And, of course, since I am still experimenting with different stuff it means that it can go a bit off the recipe from time to time. Ie. I recently tried making a stock with some chilis, but it turned out to not have almost any spiciness anyways. Next time I went overboard with three different chilis and it resulted in too spicy soup.

    So far I've stuck to a pretty basic recipe:
    Pork meat/bones(marrow)
    Onion or two
    Celery
    A few cloves of garlic
    A piece of ginger
    Carrot(optional), I read this suck some excess fat out
    Chili
    Salt/pepper/curry/other spices, but usually I just add this when cooking the actual soup. Not sure if they make any difference in the stock.
    Water to cover it all, of course.
    Bring to boil and let simmer for 4-8 hours.

    Anyone else doing this? Any tips? Which are the best meats? I tried with a bit of fat/bone taken off sirloin and it was vastly better than the pork meat/bones combo. Also, any other vegetables to add? Maybe use whole peppercorns?
    The meat for your stock would depend on what you intend to use it for, I have used a ham hock for a string bean soup. It is a lovely meal eaten with fresh rye bread. For stews I will use cubed beef rather than sirloin, sirloin is too fine a cut to be used for stock.

    Leave a comment:


  • Salinator
    replied
    Originally posted by Karri View Post
    I've yet to try that. I am wondering though if that affects the taste? Usually fat is the tastiest part.
    Eat me.

    fat-woman.jpg

    Leave a comment:


  • Bwaha
    replied

    Fat is tasty, who doesn't put salt and butter on their popcorn?



    Leave a comment:


  • Karri
    replied
    I've yet to try that. I am wondering though if that affects the taste? Usually fat is the tastiest part.

    Leave a comment:


  • BELGRAVE
    replied
    The great thing is to refrigerate the stock overnight after making it., that way the fat will form a crust on top that can be easily removed.

    Leave a comment:


  • Karri
    started a topic Home made stock

    Home made stock

    I've experimented with this occasionally, but only recently started doing it "properly". I find that it adds a complete new level of taste into soups/broths/sauces(and store bought doesn't even compare). The only thing is, it takes a lot of time. And, of course, since I am still experimenting with different stuff it means that it can go a bit off the recipe from time to time. Ie. I recently tried making a stock with some chilis, but it turned out to not have almost any spiciness anyways. Next time I went overboard with three different chilis and it resulted in too spicy soup.

    So far I've stuck to a pretty basic recipe:
    Pork meat/bones(marrow)
    Onion or two
    Celery
    A few cloves of garlic
    A piece of ginger
    Carrot(optional), I read this suck some excess fat out
    Chili
    Salt/pepper/curry/other spices, but usually I just add this when cooking the actual soup. Not sure if they make any difference in the stock.
    Water to cover it all, of course.
    Bring to boil and let simmer for 4-8 hours.

    Anyone else doing this? Any tips? Which are the best meats? I tried with a bit of fat/bone taken off sirloin and it was vastly better than the pork meat/bones combo. Also, any other vegetables to add? Maybe use whole peppercorns?

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