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  • #16
    Originally posted by Cap. Teancum View Post
    Love chili aswell, unfortunatly the wife isn't a big fan of hot food. I like mine with a kick aswell.
    Maybe it's time for a new wife or a second wife...

    Don't shoot the messenger though... when it comes to chili, wives come in second!
    Islam... it's a blast - literally.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Miss.Saigon View Post
      Yes. I think this theory was proven at Cyberia's bird feeder

      Or spread by Bear poo .
      SPORTS FREAK/ PANZERBLITZ COMMANDER/ CC2 COMMANDER

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      • #18
        Originally posted by dgfred View Post
        Or spread by Bear poo .
        Ack! I could 'barely' hang on to my chili dinner when I read that.
        Islam... it's a blast - literally.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Reiryc View Post
          Maybe it's time for a new wife or a second wife...

          Don't shoot the messenger though... when it comes to chili, wives come in second!
          No way Jose. She's awsome, will never find another one like her. I just had some tabasco on the plate, it ain't the same but it gets a little kick.
          All warfare is based on deception.
          Sun Tzu - Art of war - Chapter One - Laying Plans


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          • #20
            How do you feel about beans in the chili? I'm one of the crowd that is anti-beans in the chili. It also has to be topped with cheese and diced onion. No hot stuff other than a smidge of chili powder and fresh black pepper, either.
            Love. Where does it come from?
            from The Thin Red Line

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Dolley View Post
              How do you feel about beans in the chili? I'm one of the crowd that is anti-beans in the chili. It also has to be topped with cheese and diced onion. No hot stuff other than a smidge of chili powder and fresh black pepper, either.
              No beans if it's on a hot dog. In a bowl, beans are ok. Cheese and onion topping is wonderful! But no matter what it's gotta have some heat!
              "Every man should be his own Guru; every woman her own Gurette" ...Ed Abbey

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Dolley View Post
                How do you feel about beans in the chili? I'm one of the crowd that is anti-beans in the chili. It also has to be topped with cheese and diced onion. No hot stuff other than a smidge of chili powder and fresh black pepper, either.
                You sound like a Sloppy Joe person.

                I dig onions. The only manly vegetable.
                Flag: USA / Location: West Coast

                Prayers.

                BoRG

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by salinator View Post
                  You sound like a Sloppy Joe person.

                  I dig onions. The only manly vegetable.
                  I gotta add garlic and peppers to the manly vegetable catagory.
                  "Every man should be his own Guru; every woman her own Gurette" ...Ed Abbey

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Dolley View Post
                    How do you feel about beans in the chili? I'm one of the crowd that is anti-beans in the chili. It also has to be topped with cheese and diced onion. No hot stuff other than a smidge of chili powder and fresh black pepper, either.
                    It's all about the beans... need that alternative fuel (gas) to generate from somewhere.

                    I like chili with onion as well, but so not hip on cheese. Chili is good stuff whether it's spicy or not in my book, so whether it's a smidge of chili powder and black pepper or more, it's ok in my book.
                    Islam... it's a blast - literally.

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                    • #25
                      Story I recall is that the origins of "chili" go back to cattle drives of the Old West when cookie had to find a way to make the beef that fell along the way palatable so cooking up with a batch of peppers and whatever to soften the meat and back it more edible. Has evolved since then into likely hundreds of recipes, using various meats, or vegetarian (seems blasphemy), and of course the beans/no-beans debate.

                      When it comes to baking and certain other dishes, I might follow a "recipe", but for many things I tend to cook "ad lib". I've a basic plan/formula, but it adjusts per available items and my whimsey.

                      The following is what I cooked up this weekend. Note that I'm using a 5 quart stock pot so we can have it through most of the week. Flavor tends to improve and gain depth as it "ages". Adjust amounts accordingly if you want a smaller batch. As for hot, wife and I prefer a bit of kick, but aren't looking to burn our mouths out. Rather are after a complexity and depth of flavors, and if one wants hotter, a few dashes of a hot sauce into the bowl is recommended per individual taste.

                      Start with one large (or two medium) onions (I used yellow) diced (about 1/4-1/2" size), say four jalapenos about the length and thickness of your middle finger, 3 have seeds and pith removed, 4th doesn't (varying seed and pith removed is one way yo adjust heat) fine diced, and about 4-5 large cloves of garlic, also fine diced.

                      With a splash (couple of tablepoons) of veggie cooking oil in bottom of pan, start the onions simmering at about med-high heat, after a couple of minutes toss in the peppers (stir), and a few minutes later the garlic(stir). While these seasoning veggies are softening, cut up the meat.

                      I went with about a pound and half of a chuck steak, barely frozen to make it easier to trim and slice. Also easier to remove the larger chunks of fat. I cube it to about 3/8-1/2" size.

                      Once onions~peppers~garlic have softened, sprinkle your spices in. I'll usually go with about a teaspoon or two of cayenne powder, another tablespoon or so of paprika (hot/smoked ~ Hungarian), a couple tablespoons of regular store brand 'chili powder', a teas. or so of turmeric, also of cumin and/or ground ginger. Stir this all again. What we're after is to get the spices to 'bloom', and only need a minute or two of this.

                      Pour the veggie-spice mix into a large enough bowl and set aside. Deglaze the fond on bottom of pan using small splash of water, red wine, or tequila; then add your meat. Lightly sprinkle some ground black pepper and (sea)salt over the meat and cook a couple of minutes until just browned. Add back in the bowl of veggie-spices and stir well, cover pan and let simmer about five minutes or so, lower heat, to get flavors cooking into the meat.

                      After this mix has cooked about 5-10 minutes (or more) on low heat, I then add about 3-4 cans (15-15oz. size) of diced red tomatoes to the pot and crank heat up to med-high again. In this weekend's case, it was 3 cans of the diced red tomatoes, and a pint jar of some tomatillas we'd preserved last year (they give a sort of citrus undertaste). Since I make a pot that has some broth(soup) to it, I don't rinse contents of cans, in fact use a splash of water to get their residue out to toss into the pot.

                      Once the tomato/meat/seasoning mix is bubbling, then I add the beans. Again, I use canned ones, quicker and easier for me, you can go the dried-soaked-cooked long way if you want. I like variety, so usually 4-5 cans (15-16 oz) of one each, black, pinto, red, and kidney ("juice" and all, I don't rinse the beans). Stir everything again.

                      Just as the whole pot is about to 'boil' (be sure to be stirring often to avoid sticking to bottom) I'll add two (or more, per taste) heaping tablespoons of dark brown sugar, the sweet cuts the heat of the peppers and compliments, draws out their flavors. Also a heaping spoon(or so) of baking chocolate or about an inch cube of block (the Mexican one with cinnamon is great) chopped up. The chocolate helps darken the juice/sauce/broth to a brown color and also compliments the pepper flavors.

                      Let this simmer an hour or more, with occasional stir, before serving. And of course, tastes even better in days to come. Your topping options. We'll often add grated cheese, or a dollop of sour cream, some chopped cilantro and/or squeeze of lime. Last night we had chunks of avocado on top. Taco chips on side are another option.

                      Bon Appetite!

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                      • #26
                        You necro'd a six year old thread for that?

                        (I love a good bowl of chili!)
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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by GCoyote View Post
                          You necro'd a six year old thread for that?

                          (I love a good bowl of chili!)
                          Maybe I misused the search engine here

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                          • #28
                            Instead of pure beef, One third venison, one third beef, and a third boar. The pig tones down the bambi and makes it all taste good.

                            Nom nom nom...
                            Credo quia absurdum.


                            Quantum mechanics describes nature as absurd from the point of view of common sense. And yet it fully agrees with experiment. So I hope you can accept nature as She is - absurd! - Richard Feynman

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Bwaha View Post
                              Instead of pure beef, One third venison, one third beef, and a third boar. The pig tones down the bambi and makes it all taste good.

                              Nom nom nom...
                              Well, if I had the venison and boar ....

                              The formula/recipe I suggested is adjustable.

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