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Mulsum, the Spiced Wine of Ancient Romans

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  • Mulsum, the Spiced Wine of Ancient Romans

    Interesting and easy recipe for mulsum, the wine of ancient Romans.

    Ancient Romans drank their wine heavily diluted: 3 parts water + 1 part wine. However, they would then spice their wine with honey and other spices.

    Nobody in the civilized world drank straight wine.

    The Gauls (today we call them French) and other uncivilized poor people drank straight wine.

    This was offensive to Romans who considered them "barbarians", "alcoholics" and similar adjectives.

    http://kitchenlovestories.com/mulsum-spiced-honey-wine/


    "Artillery adds dignity to what would otherwise be a ugly brawl."
    --Frederick II, King of Prussia

  • #2
    I believe that it was a little more compicated - the degree of dilution depended very much on what the base wine was and the time of day and for some very fine wines drunk in the evening the amount of water added could be quite low but at breakfast (the Romans didn't really eat a breakfast as we know it in Britain and the USA) a heavily watered Mulsum would be drunk with perhaps a little fruit (figs etc). A modern British construction site might well have a tea boy but a Roman one would have a Mulsum slave
    The Germanic peoples and many Gauls actully drank a form of beer rather than wine and it seems that the Romans introduced wine to these areas. The Romans thought beer was extremely uncouth.
    Last edited by MarkV; 18 Jun 16, 03:42.
    Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
    Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

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    • #3
      Originally posted by MarkV View Post
      I believe that it was a little more compicated - the degree of dilution depended very much on what the base wine was and the time of day and for some very fine wines drunk in the evening the amount of water added could be quite low but at breakfast (the Romans didn't really eat a breakfast as we know it in Britain and the USA) a heavily watered Mulsum would be drunk with perhaps a little fruit (figs etc). A modern British construction site might well have a tea boy but a Roman one would have a Mulsum slave
      The Germanic peoples and many Gauls actully drank a form of beer rather than wine and it seems that the Romans introduced wine to these areas. The Romans thought beer was extremely uncouth.
      Thanks for contributing. The Romans also produced a very low quality "slave wine" for the slaves. This was diluted with vinegar and alas, seawater from the Mediterranean. I forgot the name of the concoction. It must have tasted horrible, but people drank it and it was nutritious enough to keep them alive working in the plantations...

      "Artillery adds dignity to what would otherwise be a ugly brawl."
      --Frederick II, King of Prussia

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by MonsterZero View Post
        Thanks for contributing. The Romans also produced a very low quality "slave wine" for the slaves. This was diluted with vinegar and alas, seawater from the Mediterranean. I forgot the name of the concoction. It must have tasted horrible, but people drank it and it was nutritious enough to keep them alive working in the plantations...
        I think it was less a matter of nutrition as not being infested with nasty micro organisms. The alcohol and salt water being just sufficient to kill most of them off. It's the same reason that small beer was drunk right up to the 19th century in Britain in preference to water. No one actually knew about microbes etc but experience had told them that drinking plain water (especially in towns and cities) was not a good idea.
        Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
        Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

        Comment

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