Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Your Christmas Lunch/Dinner?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Your Christmas Lunch/Dinner?

    Mine went surprisingly smooth this year.

    Had turkey for a change. Normally have a chicken, but decided to brine said beast in Christmas spices. Used oranges, nutmeg, cinnamon, allspice and garlic to flavour the bird. Made no difference as far as I or the family could tell. Guy Fieri owes me money .

    Did parsnips with honey. They were a success. Simply boiled then until they were al dente, plunged them in cold water, then dried them. Then fried them for 30 secs or so in butter and honey.
    Did carrots with orange. Okay, but nothing special. Jamie Oliver owes me money as well.
    Did Roast Potatoes, making sure they were completely dehydrated before actually roasting them. This means cooking them the day before. Total success.
    Did Red Cabbage with apple. Okay, but I forgot the Bramleys and used apple juice instead. Added lemon juice for sharpness, but not the same.
    Did sprouts with bacon and chestnuts. This works really well.

    Also did so much stuff with bacon, sausage and sausage meat as to be a bit silly. I did various sausages. I did various types of bacon. I did sausage wrapped in bacon. My wife did hollowed onions, filled with sausage meat, wrapped in bacon. She also did the cranberry sauce from scratch which was very good indeed. I did two types of sausages wrapped in bacon. It was rather heavy on the pork this year.

    Gravy was spot on, as were the two different types of stuffing. Good Xmas with the family this year. Makes a change on many levels.
    How to Talk to a Climate Skeptic: http://grist.org/series/skeptics/
    Global Warming & Climate Change Myths: https://www.skepticalscience.com/argument.php

  • #2
    Roast pork loin with garlic, rosemary, and sea salt.

    Brussels sprouts with a wine-brown sugar glaze.

    Skin on sour cream mashed red potatoes.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Nick the Noodle View Post
      Mine went surprisingly smooth this year.

      Had turkey for a change. Normally have a chicken, but decided to brine said beast in Christmas spices. Used oranges, nutmeg, cinnamon, allspice and garlic to flavour the bird. Made no difference as far as I or the family could tell. Guy Fieri owes me money .

      Did parsnips with honey. They were a success. Simply boiled then until they were al dente, plunged them in cold water, then dried them. Then fried them for 30 secs or so in butter and honey.
      Did carrots with orange. Okay, but nothing special. Jamie Oliver owes me money as well.
      Did Roast Potatoes, making sure they were completely dehydrated before actually roasting them. This means cooking them the day before. Total success.
      Did Red Cabbage with apple. Okay, but I forgot the Bramleys and used apple juice instead. Added lemon juice for sharpness, but not the same.
      Did sprouts with bacon and chestnuts. This works really well.

      Also did so much stuff with bacon, sausage and sausage meat as to be a bit silly. I did various sausages. I did various types of bacon. I did sausage wrapped in bacon. My wife did hollowed onions, filled with sausage meat, wrapped in bacon. She also did the cranberry sauce from scratch which was very good indeed. I did two types of sausages wrapped in bacon. It was rather heavy on the pork this year.

      Gravy was spot on, as were the two different types of stuffing. Good Xmas with the family this year. Makes a change on many levels.
      A burrito I warmed up in the microwave. Some days life just sucks and you end up working on the best day of the year. Merry Christmas!

      My worst jump story:
      My 13th jump was on the 13th day of the month, aircraft number 013.
      As recorded on my DA Form 1307 Individual Jump Log.
      No lie.

      ~
      "Everything looks all right. Have a good jump, eh."
      -2 Commando Jumpmaster

      Comment


      • #4
        I had to look again at the title of this thread. I first thought it was "Was your christmas lunch dinner?"

        In answer to my own question, yes it was.

        But, getting on to the point of the original question. We had roast pork, and managed to get the crackling 'just right', with a little help from our dinner guests advice. Another trick from the kitchen in the bag.

        Many Australians have a seafood style lunch for xmas. I cant stand seafood if its away from a deep fryer, (I'm a real 'pom' in that respect), and wont eat oysters in any other fashion than 'kilpatrick'.

        Seafood is such a rip-off in this country, we produce so much of it, and of such variety, yet it costs the earth. The 'laws' of supply and demand are just crap, anyway, more economic theory thats fine on paper but goes astray in practice to the almighty concept of greed. Look at local prices for petrol for a good example.

        Quiet Christmas, thank god, with days of rain on end, the usual thing for Darwin. It always rains cats and dogs at the end of the year.

        Hope your Xmas was as peaceful as ours.

        Drusus
        My Articles, ALMOST LIVE, exclusive to The Armchair!

        Soviet Submarines in WW2....The Mythology of Shiloh....(Edited) Both Sides of the Warsaw Ghetto
        GULAG Glossary....Who Really Killed The Red Baron?....Pearl Harbor At 75
        Lincoln-Douglas Debates

        Comment


        • #5
          We had a large meal. There was Fried Turkey, Glazed Ham, Green Bean Caserole, Cornbread Dressing, Rolls, Lemon Meringue Pie, Canned Corn! We have been eating leftovers since. I cheated and cooked a pot of rice today and put a can of beef stew on top! We have also been eating candy from our X-Mas stockings...

          Pruitt
          Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

          Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

          by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

          Comment


          • #6
            For lunch we had turkey, stuffing, corn, cheesy scalloped potatoes, and Avery's Jubilation winter ale. For dinner I was cooking, so it was cheese puffs, Carr's crackers w/ Havarti cheese & some spicy meat that started with a C, and Sicilian Pistachio Gelato. Both meals were excellent in very different ways!

            I only buy cheesy puffs for Christmas, so its a special treat that doubled as breakfast this morning!

            Comment


            • #7
              I had beef filet with a red wine onion sauce and home made noodles plus a salad. My Dearest Wife had Lamb. The waiter wasn't that good. Had to wait for a refill. We went out to eat with the son and his family. A nice day with no rain or snow.
              "Ask not what your country can do for you"

              Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

              you’re entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

              Comment


              • #8
                A hot day in the State of Victoria:35 degrees Celsius, so hot food was out. A lot of people go the seafood route in such a situation, but we had the usual seasoned Turkey- cold- with Glazed Ham and Salads:- Potato, Green and Waldorf. This was followed by the traditional Christmas Pudding, cold, served with ice cream.
                "I dogmatise and am contradicted, and in this conflict of opinions and sentiments I find delight".
                Samuel Johnson.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Roast duck, roast parsnips and roast spuds, sprouts, pork and apricot stuffing. Instead of wine a strong, dry locally made cider well chilled.
                  Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
                  Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Dad's cider-baked ham.
                    Indyref2 - still, "Yes."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Drusus Nero View Post
                      We had roast pork, and managed to get the crackling 'just right', with a little help from our dinner guests advice.
                      +1 for telling us what your trick was.
                      How to Talk to a Climate Skeptic: http://grist.org/series/skeptics/
                      Global Warming & Climate Change Myths: https://www.skepticalscience.com/argument.php

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        No worrries Nick...

                        Our dinner guest said the normal 'route' to perfect crackling was to wash the skin with water well, score the skin deeply, and then rub plenty of salt into the skin and scoresd, after it has been DRIED THOROUGHLY.

                        When our guest arrived, we had not done this pre-preparation. So as a "fix", she cut the semi crackled skin with litchen scissors, and then liberally sprinkled salt onto the cracks, putting it into the oven at 240 degerees.

                        When I cook pork, I ALWAYS overcook it. Semi cooked pork joints are rubbery and terrible. If you put pork striaght into the oven when it's still frozen, on about 200 degrees for about 2 and a half to 3 hours, it seals the juices in, and you can then haul it out, do the "fix" for the crackling, and ramp up the oven to 240 for about a half hour or so.

                        I am not a fan of semi cooked pork.

                        Using this method it comes out quite tender. I also do the same for lamb as well, but without the ramped up heat at the end, (I actually turn it down to 150 or so). I am not a fan of semi cooked meat of any kind. My meat must be nearly falling apart for maximum tenderness and flavour.

                        I am also not in line with the Michelin/Ramsay School that say you must let a joint of meat 'stand' for as long as you have it in the oven. "bunk" I say to that. If you cook the meat from a frozen joint to begin with at a high enough temperature, one doesnt need to let it 'stand' for any reason.

                        I also prefer gravy of the packet varity. Pan juice gravy always seems to come out too thin. Just a personal choice though. the Michelin School would not hear of using packet gravy mix for their joints of meat. I think my preference comes from my developed tastes as a child with mom's cooking. We all have that bias to a greater or lesser degree.

                        Hope this has been helpful.

                        Drusus.
                        Last edited by Drusus Nero; 27 Dec 15, 21:44.
                        My Articles, ALMOST LIVE, exclusive to The Armchair!

                        Soviet Submarines in WW2....The Mythology of Shiloh....(Edited) Both Sides of the Warsaw Ghetto
                        GULAG Glossary....Who Really Killed The Red Baron?....Pearl Harbor At 75
                        Lincoln-Douglas Debates

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Just a clarification.

                          I tend to cook roast meat in a covered container to 'seal it" at a high temperature. With pork, the "crackle" phase of the cook is done with no cover, but there is some shrinkage that should be allowed for when cooking for a group.

                          I would rather have a fully cooked, all the way through joint than a semi cooked joint with blood still running. this all depends on taste, however. The prevailing 'opinion' on lamb, for instance, says that you must have a pink innner core. I am not of this school of thought, being an ex-meat worker, who does not feel it's either healthy nor desirable to eat meat semi cooked, and to me, that is what a pink inner core represents.

                          all boxes of wholesale meat carry a health warning, telling you to "Cook thoroughly", an i follow this rule religiously. Semi cooked lamb comes out rubbery and with much less flavour; with my method, one needs only salt as a seasoner for both pork and lamb, with a bit of garlic rubbed in. Rosemary is for those who wish a 'pink' inner core, but if it's cooke properly, is not necessary for flavour, with the natural flavour of the lamb/pork coming to the fore.

                          The only exception i make is when cooking corned beef, which is done in a "slow cooker", on HIGH, for about 5 hours, with the following recipe...

                          Onions, x2, chopped in half.
                          One orange, chopped in slices with the peel left on.
                          half cup of brown vinegar, straight into the pot.
                          half cup of brown sugar, straight in also
                          A little vegetable stock, powdered form is okay.
                          a couple of pinches of garlic based mediterrainian spice mix.
                          just a little salt, not much.

                          tip water into the slow cooker so it covers the joint, then set the cooker for about 5 hours or so, depending on whether you would like the joint to fall apart( just). Pull it out of the cooker just before this happens, so for the last hour you must watch it, teasting it with a fork.

                          This produces corned beef of consistent quality and flavour, with no 'rubbery' texture. The left overs will 'cure' overnight and recombine together anyway with the cold temperature, to make slicing the joint for sandwiches easier.

                          I say again, if cooked all the way through, slowly, there is no need to let it 'stand' as the Michelin/Ramsay school tells us.

                          Serve with mustard, or just on it's own. Mashed potato works very well with corned beef, as does corn and spinach.


                          Drusus.
                          My Articles, ALMOST LIVE, exclusive to The Armchair!

                          Soviet Submarines in WW2....The Mythology of Shiloh....(Edited) Both Sides of the Warsaw Ghetto
                          GULAG Glossary....Who Really Killed The Red Baron?....Pearl Harbor At 75
                          Lincoln-Douglas Debates

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Drusus Nero View Post
                            No worrries Nick...

                            Our dinner guest said the normal 'route' to perfect crackling was to wash the skin with water well, score the skin deeply, and then rub plenty of salt into the skin and scoresd, after it has been DRIED THOROUGHLY.

                            When our guest arrived, we had not done this pre-preparation. So as a "fix", she cut the semi crackled skin with litchen scissors, and then liberally sprinkled salt onto the cracks, putting it into the oven at 240 degerees.

                            When I cook pork, I ALWAYS overcook it. Semi cooked pork joints are rubbery and terrible. If you put pork striaght into the oven when it's still frozen, on about 200 degrees for about 2 and a half to 3 hours, it seals the juices in, and you can then haul it out, do the "fix" for the crackling, and ramp up the oven to 240 for about a half hour or so.

                            I am not a fan of semi cooked pork.

                            Using this method it comes out quite tender. I also do the same for lamb as well, but without the ramped up heat at the end, (I actually turn it down to 150 or so). I am not a fan of semi cooked meat of any kind. My meat must be nearly falling apart for maximum tenderness and flavour.

                            I am also not in line with the Michelin/Ramsay School that say you must let a joint of meat 'stand' for as long as you have it in the oven. "bunk" I say to that. If you cook the meat from a frozen joint to begin with at a high enough temperature, one doesnt need to let it 'stand' for any reason.

                            I also prefer gravy of the packet varity. Pan juice gravy always seems to come out too thin. Just a personal choice though. the Michelin School would not hear of using packet gravy mix for their joints of meat. I think my preference comes from my developed tastes as a child with mom's cooking. We all have that bias to a greater or lesser degree.

                            Hope this has been helpful.

                            Drusus.
                            Will try your pork recipe at least once .

                            As for gravy, stay away from packets. What I do is to cook the meat over veg and water. I always use onion, carrot, celery and garlic. Depending on the meat I'll also use additional flavourings. When I make the gravy, I simply blitz the veg in the water I added earlier. The fat drippings from the meat and added butter/olive oil (et al), with starch from the veg, when blitzed, emulsifies really well. Basically you don't need to use flour to thicken your gravy. Since you are also using the veg you cooked with, rather than straining them away, you make a soup. A soup made of meat and veg poured over the same meat and veg can be superb if you get it right.
                            How to Talk to a Climate Skeptic: http://grist.org/series/skeptics/
                            Global Warming & Climate Change Myths: https://www.skepticalscience.com/argument.php

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Ham, ham, ham, ham, ham!
                              Wisdom is personal

                              Comment

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              Working...
                              X