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  • Pierogis, raviolis, dumplings, etc...

    So many cultures have their dough filled things filled with something delicious. What is your choice? Do you make them yourself?

    I am half Slovak and I grew up eating that cuisine when we visited my grandmother. We ate pierogis (pronounced much differently than most people I meet), stuffed cabbage, kielbasa, and sauer kraut. If the gods were smiling on me we had a pork roast sitting in a bed of sauer kraut with a mess of dumplings. Heaven.

    I hope to get my butt in gear and make some of this food, some day. I fear I will not even come close to my grandmother's skill level.
    John

    Play La Marseillaise. Play it!

  • #2
    Originally posted by JBark View Post
    So many cultures have their dough filled things filled with something delicious. What is your choice? Do you make them yourself?

    I am half Slovak and I grew up eating that cuisine when we visited my grandmother. We ate pierogis (pronounced much differently than most people I meet), stuffed cabbage, kielbasa, and sauer kraut. If the gods were smiling on me we had a pork roast sitting in a bed of sauer kraut with a mess of dumplings. Heaven.

    I hope to get my butt in gear and make some of this food, some day. I fear I will not even come close to my grandmother's skill level.
    1) You never know if you will come close to your grandmother's skill if you don't try.
    2) I'm a mongrel Part Welsh/English/Polish/Latvian mix

    I started cooking through photography and found I loved the cooking as much as the photography - this was late (relatively) in life as at 'home' my mother cooked, wanted help, but then banished me in my father from the kitchen. I observed and ate... but did not cook till I was married and began to drive a large-format camera and then never looked back.

    I strongly believe that if one understands the taste and the feeling behind the dish it is more important to a stark recipe book (though they are good reference materials).

    Be warned, cooking is hard work, though I find it enjoyable and have cooked for 100+ people; never, NEVER for myself.

    The fun, then lies in experimenting and talking pasta, the joys of cooking nettles that one has foraged from the wayside... and just love mushroom in any form.. but the possibilities are as wide as ones imagination. Think of a taste one really likes... and aim for it!

    Smacznego! Mwynhewch eich pryd! Labu apetīti!!!!

    Per Ardua ad Astra

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    • #3
      Watch some cooking shows and google-fu some recipes. You will do fine with some trial and error.
      SPORTS FREAK/ PANZERBLITZ COMMANDER/ CC2 COMMANDER

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      • #4
        Originally posted by dgfred View Post
        Watch some cooking shows and google-fu some recipes. You will do fine with some trial and error.
        http://www.channel4.com/programmes/simply-italian Maria Chiappa was just brilliant on raviolli/pasta. However, agree with dgfred, dive in and try!
        Per Ardua ad Astra

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        • #5
          Clootie dumpling - the food of the gods (even a god couldn't eat a whole one);

          The insipid, "Dumplings," (balls of dough) of our southern neighbours just aren't worth the candle.
          Attached Files
          Indyref2 - still, "Yes."

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          • #6
            Grandma made pierogi. They were damned good, too. They certainly surpassed her chitterlings, or her Christmas goose, and the fat drippings she harvested.

            Originally posted by the ace View Post
            Clootie dumpling - the food of the gods (even a god couldn't eat a whole one);

            The insipid, "Dumplings," (balls of dough) of our southern neighbours just aren't worth the candle.
            What the fck is that? It looks like a dead Martian's brain or something.
            I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

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            • #7
              ^ http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Clootie-Dumpling/

              Suet?

              I'll stick with perogi. Think mini meat pie and stuffings could vary.
              TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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              • #8
                Forgot to mention, my preference in pierogis was mashed potatoe filling or sauer kraut. All else is for crap.
                John

                Play La Marseillaise. Play it!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by JBark View Post
                  So many cultures have their dough filled things filled with something delicious. What is your choice? Do you make them yourself?

                  I am half Slovak and I grew up eating that cuisine when we visited my grandmother. We ate pierogis (pronounced much differently than most people I meet), stuffed cabbage, kielbasa, and sauer kraut. If the gods were smiling on me we had a pork roast sitting in a bed of sauer kraut with a mess of dumplings. Heaven.
                  Ahhhhhh, I am with you here. Both the Polish and Ukrainian sides made all the above. I have to add paska at holidays to the list.

                  Regards,
                  Dennis
                  Last edited by D1J1; 05 Aug 15, 20:19. Reason: Spelling wasn't worth squat!
                  If stupid was a criminal offense Sea Lion believers would be doing life.

                  Shouting out to Half Pint for bringing back the big mugs!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by D1J1 View Post
                    Ahhhhhh, I am wth you here. Both the Polish and Ukranian sides made all the above. I have to add puska at holidays to the list.

                    Regards,
                    Dennis
                    What is puska?
                    John

                    Play La Marseillaise. Play it!

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                    • #11
                      The sound you make after eatting

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by slick_miester View Post
                        Grandma made pierogi. They were damned good, too. They certainly surpassed her chitterlings, or her Christmas goose, and the fat drippings she harvested.



                        What the fck is that? It looks like a dead Martian's brain or something.
                        Haha... I thought it was a mushroom top at first . Then maybe a swollen tick .
                        SPORTS FREAK/ PANZERBLITZ COMMANDER/ CC2 COMMANDER

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by JBark View Post
                          What is puska?
                          Spelled wrong....corrected to paska. It is a wonderfully delicious bread.

                          Regards,
                          Dennis
                          If stupid was a criminal offense Sea Lion believers would be doing life.

                          Shouting out to Half Pint for bringing back the big mugs!

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                          • #14
                            I always preferred the cheese or potato pierogis. The sauerkraut ones were a bit much. I'm a Ukrainian/Slovak mix. My Mom made the best stuffed cabbage around. She retired several years ago as she's now 95.
                            Does anyone else remember (phonetic spelling) stew-da-nina? It was cut up pig parts in a gelatin/grease congealed mix? Sounds gross but tasted great.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by johns624 View Post
                              I always preferred the cheese or potato pierogis. The sauerkraut ones were a bit much. I'm a Ukrainian/Slovak mix. My Mom made the best stuffed cabbage around. She retired several years ago as she's now 95.
                              Does anyone else remember (phonetic spelling) stew-da-nina? It was cut up pig parts in a gelatin/grease congealed mix? Sounds gross but tasted great.
                              So... I guess you are not into advertising or an Estate Agent
                              But some foods taste wonderful, even though the description does not do justice!
                              Per Ardua ad Astra

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