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  • #76
    Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
    Green Beans with Tomatoes and Bacon Recipe
    https://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipe...oes_and_bacon/

    Healthier Mayo Free Waldorf Salad: Vegetarian & Gluten Free
    https://www.sugarfreemom.com/recipes...n-gluten-free/
    Just got that green beans one going for tomorrow. Doing a double recipe with a few tweaks. A bit heavy on the onion and especially garlic (I like garlic a lot) ... doing about a tablespoon of Italian Seasoning and Oregano in place of the thyme. Using garden/produce bin tomatoes in place of canned, A sprinkle of cayenne and paprika, and a splash of apple cider vinegar.

    All blended and sitting in the crock pot, slow cook into tomorrow. We'll do the Waldorf in morning as this is one that doesn't keep long and is best made and served that day.

    Between these two and a couple other items, we'll have our part of the family potluck for Thanksgiving tossed together.
    TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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    • #77
      5 Secret Tricks to Making the Best Lasagna Ever
      https://www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddri...Bnb7Kz#image=1

      The Best Ever Lasagna
      https://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/...-ever-lasagna/
      TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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      • #78
        A look at India cuisine ...

        Padma Lakshmi, Scars and All

        The Top Chef host gives a very personal food tour of New York City.

        https://www.vulture.com/2019/01/padm...f-profile.html
        TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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        • #79
          65 Make-Ahead Weeknight Dinner Recipes

          The Epicurious Editors
          1/7/2019


          https://www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddri...snbcrd#image=1
          TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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          • #80
            15 things you didn't know you could make in a Crock-Pot
            https://www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddri...z&ocid=msnbcrd

            The Absolute Best Way to Roast a Whole Chicken, According to 5 Chefs
            https://www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddri...z&ocid=msnbcrd
            TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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            • #81
              One of many favorite foods my wife and I enjoy is Pho'. Anyone who's been to a Pho' restaurant will notice there is the ubiquitous bottle of "Rooster" sriracha hot sauce to flavor your noodle bowl with. My wife having a few food type sensitivities, this particular brand of condiment is a no-go since it contains "vinegar" and we've come to realize that such is usually made from wheat, one of the food groups she reacts to. Other vinegars, such as balsamic, rice, (apple) cider, etc. can work. We ( I ) have learned to read ingredients labels and how to "decode" some of those contents.

              So when it comes to a version of hot sauce that is common and ubiquitous like "Sriracha" I've often wondered if we might want to consider and explore the option of another kitchen based DIY. Let's start with this interesting article regarding the origins of "Sriracha" or "Si Racha" sauce;

              In Home Of Original Sriracha Sauce, Thais Say Rooster Brand Is Nothing To Crow About
              ...
              Sriracha sauce. It's everywhere. Even beer and donuts. The fiery chili paste concocted by Vietnamese-American immigrant David Tran has conquered the American market and imagination in the past decade.

              But the original Sriracha is actually Thai — and comes from the seaside city of Si Racha, where most residents haven't even heard of the U.S. brand, which is now being exported to Thailand.

              I decided to go to the source to get the dirt on the sauce, and sat down with 71-year-old Saowanit Trikityanukul. Her grandmother was making Sriracha sauce when David Tran was still a baby, in what was then South Vietnam.

              "If my grandmother was still alive today, she'd be 127 years old," Saowanit says, sitting in her garden in Si Racha, (the preferred anglicized spelling of the city's name) overlooking the Gulf of Thailand. She remembers helping her grandmother in the kitchen as an impatient 9-year-old.

              "My job was to mix all the ingredients together. But I wasn't very happy doing it and I didn't really pay attention. I regret that now," she says. "Because I could have learned a lot."

              Her grandmother is widely credited with being the first to make and sell the sauce. But Saowanit says it was really her great-grandfather, Gimsua Timkrajang, who made it first. Family lore says he traveled a lot on business to neighboring Myanmar, Cambodia and Laos and noticed they all had different sauces — sweet, salty, sour — but nothing that combined all three.

              "So, my great-grandfather got an idea that he wanted to make one sauce that went along with all Thai foods," she says, "very creamy and different from other sauces."

              And he got it. Not that it was easy making it. Saowanit remembers one batch that took weeks, even months, to prepare.

              "We had to prepare the ingredients like pickled garlic, so we had to peel the garlic to make sure it was good," she says. "And the the chilis had to be perfectly red. And then the salt — my grandmother would only choose the big chunks and boil it, then filter and strain it ... and leave it in the sun until it dried."

              The family originally made the sauce just for themselves and their friends. Then her grandmother's sister and brother started selling their own versions in Si Racha, where its harmonious blend of chilis, garlic, salt and vinegar appeals to both locals and tourists from nearby Bangkok. But the family never patented the name.

              "We didn't want to keep it to ourselves," she says, adding that it wasn't much of a secret anyway — the ingredients were there on the side of the bottles for everyone to see. Soon there were dozens of imitators in Si Racha and beyond. Including, eventually, the Terminator of Srirachas, David Tran's famous Rooster brand.
              ...
              And the American version is very different from what's made here, she says. I've brought along a half-dozen local favorites for her to try, blindfolded, along with a bottle of the American interloper. She works her way through the Thai versions. Surprise! Her two favorites are the ones originally made by her grandmother's siblings.
              ...
              "It's not tasty," she says, taking a sip of water. "It's not mixed together properly. There's only one taste." Saowanit says a proper Sriracha sauce needs to be what Thais call klom klom — the hotness, the sour, the sweet and the garlic all blending together seamlessly, none overpowering the other. The American version, she says, just brings heat.
              ....
              https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt...ing-to-crow-ab
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

              So, it seems that a quick 'Google'/Web-search shows several pages(of course) relating to this sauce, and it's composition ~ making;
              https://www.google.com/search?client...si+racha+sauce

              Narrowing down the options, here seemed a good place to start;
              https://www.seriouseats.com/2012/02/...ch-sauces.html
              A couple of issues:
              1st is the effort focuses on trying to reproduce that "rooster" version ...
              2nd is the 'pepper' issue; Fresno vs. Red Jalapeños Peppers
              3rd is it seems fermentation is involved (no real problem for us, as we already do some fermentation recipes in our kitchen on a routine basis) ...

              Taking a side step and using an embedded link, we come across this recipe idea. Note that unless baking, most recipes are a basic start point that can be adjusted and modified per tastes, preferences, and available ingredients. For example, I'm inclined to use honey over sugar whenever such might work. So here's a start point recipe to work with. (I'll get back later after we have a chance to try this out, or it's tweaks, to see what we get);
              https://leitesculinaria.com/67202/re...cha-sauce.html
              TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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              • #82
                How 1 veteran went from homelessness to sweet success after making a delicious mistake

                ...
                Stefan DeArmon was struggling to support his parents while living in a homeless shelter until his ambitious nature, a fateful meeting, a simple mistake and some really, really good cornbread changed his life forever.
                ....
                "He had his black chef coat and his white undershirt. And I said, 'Sir, you've got the spirit. I'm calling you 'the Reverend' and you're coming to work at Smoke,'" Smoke BBQ owner Roland Feldman recalled to TODAY.

                DeArmon began working as a dishwasher and quickly worked his way up to preparing food. One day while he was preparing a batch of the restaurant's signature cornbread, DeArmon accidentally poured heavy cream into the batter instead of buttermilk. Feldman decided to have DeArmon bake it up and what ensued proved how wonderful a simple mistake can be.

                "It came out a little bit higher, it was moist, golden brown. They passed it out and everyone loved it," DeArmon told TODAY.

                The cornbread was so good, that it inspired Feldman to bring DeArmon on as a business partner. And so the Reverend Cornbread Co. was born.
                ....
                https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/good-...z&ocid=msnbcrd
                TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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                • #83
                  Note that a mix of ground beef and ground pork can add even more taste and flavor to these;

                  How to Turn a Pound of Ground Beef Into Dinner (3 Ideas for Tonight)
                  https://www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddri...z&ocid=msnbcrd
                  TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

                  Comment


                  • #84
                    This Is the Surprising Dish That Sparked Julia Child's Career
                    ...
                    For one of her first meals in Paris, Julia Child ate sole meuniere, a simple-seeming white fish cooked in butter and lemon. In her memoir, My Life in France, she called it "the most exciting meal of my life." The soon-to-be famous chef was already in her 40s when she tasted this fish, and it may have launched her glorious career. When we heard this, we just had to taste the fish that changed the course of home cooking!
                    ...
                    https://www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddri...z&ocid=msnbcrd
                    TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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                    • #85
                      6 Things You Should Make with Butter and 6 You Shouldn’t

                      https://www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddri...z&ocid=msnbcrd
                      TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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                      • #86
                        Five foods chefs say should never be microwaved, video;
                        https://www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddri...j?ocid=msnbcrd

                        Pizza
                        Bagels
                        Steak
                        Brocholi
                        Leafy Greens (might actually spark/flame)
                        TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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                        • #87
                          Quick general references;
                          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bouillabaisse
                          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paella
                          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gumbo
                          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jambalaya
                          TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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                          • #88
                            Not exactly a "recipe", but an essential for cooking;

                            The Frankfurt Kitchen Changed How We Cook—and Live

                            There are “dream kitchens,” and then there’s the Frankfurt Kitchen, designed by architect Margarete Schütte-Lihotzky in 1926.
                            ...
                            The idea of a dedicated space to cook, which might also be stylish and even fun to spend time in, was only possible because of two major impacts of industrialization. First, mass production, along with municipal gas, water, and electricity, made modern appliances affordable, and more broadly, it triggered an enormous social upheaval that transformed social class in the western world. In other words, the 20th-century kitchen was a new kind of room designed for a new kind of person.

                            Second, after World War I, women who had formerly worked in domestic service began pursuing better paying kinds of work, like teaching, nursing, retail, and factory labor. The Great Depression wiped out much of the recently accrued wealth of the 1920s, and many families learned to do without housekeepers and cooks, sometimes for good.

                            As if on cue, manufacturers had just the thing: appliances that were advertised, as in one especially glamorous Westinghouse print ad from 1922, as “invisible servants.” In the 1920s and ‘30s, modern appliances were sometimes seen to substitute for household staff in families that could no longer afford help, or they could make domestic life easier for families that had never had help in the first place. Julia Child would later refer to these people (which is to say, the vast majority of humanity) as “servantless”— an idea so novel in the context of gourmet cooking that it needed its own special term.

                            The suburban dream kitchens of the 1950s took this idea to the nth degree, positioning the kitchen not only as a high-tech realm of push-button ease and efficiency, but also as an attractive, cozy, and even festive living space where families could spend time and enjoy meals together—a far cry from How the Other Half Lives.

                            But there’s a missing piece in the heritage of the dream-kitchen narrative, and it’s the apartment kitchen. In a sense, its roots lie in the tenement kitchens of mid-20th century nightmares, because it was designed as an antidote to their Old World counterparts. It was modern, colorful, geometric, efficient, and stylish. Like Modernism itself, it came from Europe, and it changed everything.

                            You might not have heard of the Frankfurt Kitchen, but if you have neatly organized cabinets, an easy-to-clean tiled backsplash, and a colorful countertop, in a sense, you already cook in one.
                            ...
                            https://www.citylab.com/design/2019/...=pocket-newtab

                            TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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                            • #89
                              The Right Way to Cut Tomatoes, No Matter How You’re Using Them

                              https://www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddri...L&ocid=msnbcrd
                              TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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                              • #90
                                Guacamole Gets Even Better, Thanks to This Genius Move

                                ...
                                Both are good; both disappear quickly. I'm still going to tell you about a third method, one that I heard about from both Food52er LLStone and Caitlin Freeman of Blue Bottle Coffee. Freeman called it "the best guacamole I’ve had in my life (from my hands or the hands of any other)." It skates between The Chunk and The Blend, and it might change the way you think about guacamole.
                                ...
                                https://www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddri...z&ocid=msnbcrd
                                TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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