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  • #91
    Very long, but informative and entertaining ...

    How the Chile Pepper Took Over the World

    Until 500 years ago, the spice as we know it was confined to Central and South America. Matt Gross travels to Jamaica, Hungary, and Thailand to uncover how that heat wave came, saw, and conquered.

    https://medium.com/airbnbmag/chile-pepper-8886f839b5c0
    TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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    • #92
      Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
      For lack of a better thread fit ...

      Inside Sweden’s bizarre obsession with salty licorice
      https://www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddri...9dq?li=BBnbfcL

      Not just Sweden. We've a strong Dutch community here in this part of the county and some local stores carry assorted brands and types of salty licorice (and other Dutch brands and specialties).
      BTW, some isn't so bad and has merit in hot weather when being outside, such as farming activities.
      Same in Finland. Here in Mexico they don't eat liquorice, instead opting for the chili-candy which is much the same.

      I don't get why people think this is obsession or strange; sweet and salty tastes goes together very well.
      Wisdom is personal

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      • #93
        Mediterranean diet: How to start (and stay on) one of the world's healthiest diets

        https://www.cnn.com/2019/01/03/healt...ips/index.html
        TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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        • #94
          Italy’s practically perfect food
          Pound for pound, Parmigiano-Reggiano can compete with almost any food for calcium, amino acids, protein and vitamin A – and is prescribed by doctors to cure ailments.
          http://www.bbc.com/travel/story/2019...y-perfect-food

          Long but interesting article.
          TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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          • #95
            As one whom has a couple hens whom are now laying again, I'm getting 2-3 eggs a day and need to keep up with them, but the following puts the daily scrambled egg breakfast in question again.

            Eggs May Be Bad for the Heart, a New Study Says, —But There's More to the Story

            ...
            Eggs are a staple of American breakfasts, but they’re a highly controversial food. Are they healthy or not? Do they raise cholesterol? Should you eat only the egg whites, or opt for yolks?

            A new study tries to answer those questions, but it also adds to the long-standing debate around eggs. The research, published in JAMA, says that the dietary cholesterol in eggs is associated with a heightened risk of cardiovascular disease and early death — even though the federal dietary guidelines, and plenty of nutrition experts, consider eggs part of a healthy diet. The most recent edition of the dietary guidelines even dropped its recommended cap on daily dietary cholesterol, citing a lack of evidence for a specific limit. (Previously, it was set at 300 milligrams per day, or a little less than the cholesterol content in two eggs.)
            ...
            “Limiting foods rich in dietary cholesterol, such as eggs, may be important to consider when choosing a healthy eating pattern,” Zhong says. “Egg whites, which are a rich source of high-quality protein without dietary cholesterol, can be used to replace whole eggs.”

            But yolks are the primary source of many nutrients found in eggs, including amino acids, iron and choline, so there is a downside to dropping them. Yolks are also one of the only natural sources of vitamin D, which many Americans lack.

            The research on eggs is contradictory — for now — so people (and their doctors) must personally decide how many eggs is too many, Zhong says. Those who are already at risk of cardiovascular issues may want to be more cautious than those who aren’t, especially if they have a family or medical history of heart disease. Your doctor can help define the right range for you.
            ...
            http://time.com/5551508/are-eggs-bad-for-you/
            TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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            • #96
              When Gut Bacteria Change Brain Function
              ...
              By now, the idea that gut bacteria affect a person’s health is not revolutionary. Many people know that these microbes influence digestion, allergies, and metabolism. The trend has become almost commonplace: New books appear regularly detailing precisely which diet will lead to optimum bacterial health.

              But these microbes’ reach may extend much further, into the human brains. A growing group of researchers around the world are investigating how the microbiome, as this bacterial ecosystem is known, regulates how people think and feel. Scientists have found evidence that this assemblage, —about a thousand different species of bacteria, trillions of cells that together weigh between one and three pounds—, could play a crucial role in autism, anxiety, depression, and other disorders.

              “There’s been an explosion of interest in the connections between the microbiome and the brain,” says Emeran Mayer, a gastroenterologist at the University of California, Los Angeles, who has been studying the topic for the past five years.
              ...
              https://getpocket.com/explore/item/w...brain-function
              TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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              • #97
                Probably fits here best ...

                The Surprisingly Little-Known History of White Rice in Korea
                How Japan had everything to do with the most important ingredient in Korean cuisine today.
                ...
                My grandmother, born in 1930, was raised in Japanese-occupied Korea. After China and Japan fought for centuries over Korea (“a shrimp between two whales”, as the old Korean proverb goes), Japan emerged the victor in the early 1900s, officially annexing the colony in 1910.

                While Japan had by then made great strides in its agricultural and manufacturing development, it was fast losing the means to feed its own population domestically. Japan had already been importing rice, mostly from Southeast Asia. But during World War I, British and French colonial rule restricted Japan’s access to this rice, triggering inflation, economic hardship, and the rice riots (kome sōdō) of 1918.

                Japan had to look closer to home for its rice supply. Luckily, it had just taken over a country lush with agricultural land, natural resources, and a temperate climate ideal for rice production: Korea.

                Korea was always a largely agricultural country.

                According to R. Malcom Keir, by the beginning of Japan’s occupation, 75 percent of Korea’s population was engaged in farming, with 94 percent of the arable land devoted specifically to rice fields. The Japanese catalogued over 1,400 varieties of rice indigenous to Korea at this time, but by the end of the occupation, virtually none of them would remain.

                Japan was among the first to genetically engineer rice (through hybridization) to be higher yielding, quicker to harvest, and more resistant to disease (and more susceptible to fertilizer). Through the Campaign to Increase Rice Production, launched in 1920, Japanese land holders instructed their Korean tenant farmers to actively sow these specific varieties of rice, replacing many of the native Korean rice and paddy rice varieties. Japanese varieties went from making up 2 to 3 percent of Korea’s rice to 90 percent. Korea quickly became Japan’s breadbasket, increasing its rice production by more than 250 percent, eventually supplying almost 98 percent of Japanese rice imports.

                So what did this mean for Korea?

                While Japan was able to revolutionize Korean rice production and address their own shortage, they were suddenly unable to feed the colony itself. Eventually Japan had to start importing other cereal grains such as millet, corn, and sorghum to feed the Korean population, which was already relying on barley as their main source of grain. This is likely when japgok bap (a multi-grain rice mix of glutinous rice, millet, sorghum, black beans, and red beans) came into practice, an economical way to fill out the scarce white rice.

                Korea’s rice shortage worsened as Japan entered World War II and heavily rationed the colony. Even after the war, post–Japanese occupation, U.S. forces in Korea struggled and failed to rehabilitate food security, creating severe inflation in the cost of rice and spurring a heavy black market for what little was left of it. My grandmother’s family would barter their surplus rice for banchan and vegetables. White rice became an even greater commodity.
                ...
                https://food52.com/blog/23925-histor...-rice-in-korea
                TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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                • #98
                  This should be a big "Duh!"
                  Can What We Eat Affect How We Feel?


                  Nutritional psychiatrists counsel patients on how better eating may be another tool in helping to ease depression and anxiety and may lead to better mental health.
                  ...
                  https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/28/w...sychiatry.html
                  TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

                  Comment


                  • #99
                    Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
                    This should be a big "Duh!"
                    Can What We Eat Affect How We Feel?




                    Nutritional psychiatrists counsel patients on how better eating may be another tool in helping to ease depression and anxiety and may lead to better mental health.
                    ...
                    Serenely full, the epicure would say,
                    Fate cannot harm me, I have dined today
                    Reverend Sydney Smith 1771 -1846
                    Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
                    Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

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                    • These spices may be the key to a long life

                      Dr. Sanjay Gupta travels to India to see how the age-old Ayurvedic diet helps people live longer, healthier lives.

                      https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/vid...L?ocid=msnbcrd
                      TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

                      Comment


                      • The Definitive Superfood Ranking

                        It seems like everything in the grocery store is labeled "super." We dove into which foods are actually proven, by science, to be good for you and which ones are all hype.

                        ...
                        https://getpocket.com/explore/item/t...=pocket-newtab
                        TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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                        • A rather helpful and healthful tip here ...

                          Eating leftover rice can make you very sick. Here's how to properly store it
                          https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/hea...L&ocid=msnbcrd
                          TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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                          • Amazing Uses of Egg Shells

                            https://healthlignetap.com/you-will-...-you-see-this/
                            TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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                            • Couple of somewhat related;

                              Yes, you need to wash your produce. Here’s how.
                              https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.4aed911166e8

                              On the Hunt for the World’s Rarest Pasta

                              Delicate and impossible to replicate, su filindeu (or the “threads of God”) is a pasta made of hundreds of tiny strands by a single woman in a hillside town in Sardinia. She’ll make it for you too—if you’re willing to walk 20 miles overnight.
                              https://getpocket.com/explore/item/o...=pocket-newtab
                              TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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                              • Revenge of the Lunch Lady
                                How an unassuming bureaucrat outsmarted Jamie Oliver and pulled off an honest-to-god miracle in one of America's unhealthiest cities.
                                ...
                                In the fall of 2009, the British celebrity chef Jamie Oliver arrived in Huntington, West Virginia, which had recently been named the unhealthiest city in America. Huntingtonians were suffering in record numbers from diabetes and heart disease. They were being destroyed by the mountains of burgers and fries and nuggets that filled their restaurants, schools, refrigerators and arteries. They were fulfilling the prophecy that this generation of children would be the first to live shorter lives than their parents. Oliver had come to save them—and to film a season of his new reality show, “Food Revolution.”The first thing he saw when he walked into the kitchen of Central City Elementary School was the breakfast pizza. It looked like you remember school pizza: a rectangle of bleached dough spackled with red sauce and melted cheese. What made it breakfast, presumably, was that each slice also had crumbles of sausage scattered across it. That, and it was 7:40 a.m.

                                Oliver was disgusted by the school’s freezers (an “Aladdin’s cave of processed crap”), by the “luminous” strawberry milk that kids poured on their cereal and by the instant potato pearls that tasted like “starchy fluff with off nuts in it.” To his astonishment, all of these foods were considered part of a healthy diet by the standards of the U.S. government.
                                ...
                                Despite the locals’ resistance, it looked as if Oliver was replicating that success in Huntington. He built a gleaming cooking center in a long-empty building downtown. He introduced a range of made-from-scratch school dishes—beefy nachos, tuna pasta bake with seven vegetables, rainbow salad with creamy dressing. And he did righteous battle with the unimaginative bureaucrats who seemed to want kids to keep eating the same sludge. In scene after scene, Rhonda McCoy, Cabell County’s uptight and slightly menacing schools food-service director, reminded the chef that his revolution had to conform to the government’s endless standards and regulations. “I just wanted to cook some food,” a baffled Oliver protested. “This is like a math test.” When the show aired, McCoy’s inbox filled with hate mail from around the country. At home, there was grumbling that she should resign. But there was a problem with this made-for-TV narrative—several, actually. Shortly after Oliver left, a study by the West Virginia University Health Research Center reported that 77 percent of students were “very unhappy” with his food. Students who relied on school meals for nearly half of their daily calories routinely dumped their trays in the trash. Some did it because they hated the taste; others because it became the cool thing to do. And while Oliver’s meals used fresh, high-quality ingredients, many turned out to be too high in fat to meet the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s standards. Within a year, McCoy said, the number of students eating school lunch fell 10 percent, forcing her to cut her budget and lay off several cooks.

                                In almost every respect, it would have been easier for McCoy to drop this grand experiment in school-lunch reform that had been foisted on her. Her employees were overworked, and the fresh food was more expensive, even after McCoy abandoned the free-range chicken and organic vegetables that Oliver had insisted on (and that school officials say ABC Productions had paid for). There’s only so much you can do when you have $1.50 to spend on ingredients for each meal. But over the next few years, McCoy accomplished exactly what Oliver had set out to do himself: She saved school lunch in Huntington and proved that cafeteria food isn’t destined to be a national joke.
                                ...
                                To those unfamiliar with the absurdist theater of school lunch, it is puzzling, even maddening, that feeding kids nutritious food should be so hard. You buy good food. You cook it. You serve it to hungry kids.

                                Yet the National School Lunch Program, an $11.7 billion behemoth that feeds more than 31 million children each day, is a mess, and has been for years. Conflicts of interest were built into the program. It was pushed through Congress after World War II with the support of military leaders who wanted to ensure that there would be enough healthy young men to fight the next war, and of farmers who were looking for a place to unload their surplus corn, milk and meat. The result was that schools became the dumping ground for the cheap calories our modern agricultural system was designed to overproduce.

                                This tension has played out over and over again, with children usually ending up the losers. A case in point: In 1981, America was awash in surplus dairy. The government’s Inland Storage and Distribution Center—a network of tunnels beneath Kansas City, Missouri—was filled with 200 million pounds of cheese and butter, stacked “like frozen pillars and stretching over acres of gray stone floor,” according to The Associated Press. In an effort to ease the glut, the USDA purchased millions of pounds of dairy for schools. But, according to Janet Poppendieck, a professor at Hunter College who specializes in poverty and hunger, this encouraged dairy farmers to keep on milking. So in 1986 the government had to create a new program, the Whole Herd Buyout, which paid farmers to slaughter the dairy cows. The government then bought the beef, which was turned into hamburger, taco meat and so on for school lunch.

                                That flood of meat and dairy hiked the fat content of school meals just as the country was descending into an anti-fat frenzy. In 1990, the federal government issued new dietary guidelines, declaring that a healthy diet should contain no more than 30 percent fat, with a 10 percent cap on saturated fat. But cafeterias simply had too much of the wrong food to comply. In a USDA study of 544 schools conducted several years later, only 1 percent met the requirement for overall fat and just a single school had managed to keep saturated fat to a healthy level. The deeply conflicted nature of the program was showing itself once again.
                                ...
                                https://highline.huffingtonpost.com/...=pocket-newtab
                                TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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