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  • Just had an excellent tritip; just a tiny little piece left for tomorrows lunch. Went very well with an Asian sesame salad. No carbos, plenty of veg and the steak which was perfect. Kids and wife all had seconds, success!

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    • Boomer,what is a tritip?
      That rug really tied the room together

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      • Originally posted by sebfrench76 View Post
        These are not real french crepes.Even if they look delightful,the ones pictured are made for the tourists.

        Real ones are made in Britanny and look like these.





        The name is also " galette de Sarrazin".
        The Galette is versatile and fun, years ago - maybe still in the King's Road, Chelsea, was Astérix, une Véritable Crêperie......... in my late teens, early 20s I dined some girlfriends and both my wives (separately, I may add - as in serial monogamy!).

        Fois Gras and Fromagerie (but look out! The British are now with over 700 serious cheeses these days and counting, including Isis (the river in Oxford - not the murderers)!

        France 1959 I fell in love with mushrooms, somewhere around Niort I think. I do remember the meal somehow - I was 4, but remember the waiter was happy I loved the mushrooms and I had a Niort label on my suitcase for some time. Ratatouille and Provonçal food in general is quite hearty and cook it faily frequently - I love aubergine and cougettes anyway. Grenouille is quite delicate, though not on the list. The croissant on the list is naturally a great breakfast favourite if baked properly dripping in good butter. Marseilles' Bouillabaisse should have had a mention, but was absent from the list.

        Never been known to shy away from Haute cuisine, but the real stength of French cooking (and Italian - and for that matter British, now it being rediscovered and not too soon!) is the the strength in the regional dishes, Languedocois moules washed down with Noilly Prat, the moules (mussels) bought fresh just ouside Chais Noilly-Prat, Marseillan, driven to the next village, cooked and consumed within the hour is a ritual, remembered. The fuss over Novelle Cuisine and Cuisine Minceur was very much of a fad, in my opinion, though as with everything there are always lessons to be learned.

        And then there is wine... and then there is Armagnac.....
        Per Ardua ad Astra

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        • You are FRENCH !
          ATTENTION!!It could be dangerous for your health!!
          Seriously,a great homage to our way of life,I do appreciate
          That rug really tied the room together

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          • Originally posted by sebfrench76 View Post
            You are FRENCH !
            ATTENTION!!It could be dangerous for your health!!
            Seriously,a great homage to our way of life,I do appreciate
            LOL Just took a leaf out Edward VII's Entente Cordiale ) Bon Appetit!
            Per Ardua ad Astra

            Comment


            • Originally posted by slick_miester View Post
              All kidding aside, I've heard that dining out in France -- not just Paris -- is pretty damned expensive, such that most French only dine out on special occasions, and otherwise "brown-bag" their lunch 360 out of 365 days. Was I misinformed?
              I've eaten a variety of food in France and there are plenty that are priced like our foods here. One of my favorites is a street vendor's ham sandwich on a baguette. Simple but delicious. My last trip there we grabbed some packaged sandwiches at the local grocery to eat at he airport (our last day.). They taste 10x better than what you find here unless you go to a gourmet shop.
              Remember that France does not have 7-11's or WaWa, or Quik Chek (name your local convenience store.). Their packaged food seems recently made and to me taste much better than ours.
              Dining out, not just grabbing sandwiches, is not necessarily pricy. Keep in mind that tourists don't go looking for non tourist restaurants.
              John

              Play La Marseillaise. Play it!

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              • Originally posted by JBark View Post
                Dining out, not just grabbing sandwiches, is not necessarily pricy. Keep in mind that tourists don't go looking for non tourist restaurants.
                Doubt my son starved yesterday in Paris... at least he did not sound distressed. I would say that in Paris there is a wider range of pricing than in London. i.e. There is an expensive end with vintage wines but also a wide variety of humble, but good quality establishments - plus a whole range in between.

                As everywhere, the less adventerous tourists for sure miss out big-time.
                Per Ardua ad Astra

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                • Originally posted by Lāčplēsis View Post
                  Doubt my son starved yesterday in Paris... at least he did not sound distressed. I would say that in Paris there is a wider range of pricing than in London. i.e. There is an expensive end with vintage wines but also a wide variety of humble, but good quality establishments - plus a whole range in between.

                  As everywhere, the less adventerous tourists for sure miss out big-time.
                  I was in the London suburbs two years ago and remember breakfast and our fish and chips dinner to be higher than the equivalent in the U.S.
                  John

                  Play La Marseillaise. Play it!

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                  • Never eat where there are no locals,tourists restaurants are tourists traps.
                    Regarding the prices,in my city Rouen, the average price of a single plate meal is 8euros,wich is not cheap.
                    Starter+first course w/t dessert:12 euros
                    The same with dessert :14/15 euros.
                    In Paris ,you can add 5 euros to these prices.

                    Use your brain ,why do you want to eat Mc Do in France,when for the same price you can have wonderful French sandwiches with baguette ?
                    When I am in Italy,I eat pizzas,no big macs.
                    A country is not a amusement park where you come to find what you know you will find.
                    When I am travelling ,I become more local than the locals ,and I smile at everybody.When you smile,all the doors suddenly open.
                    But if you think that this is the country that has to do the effort of welcoming you,just like you are indispensable for whatever reason ,you're dead wrong.
                    That rug really tied the room together

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                    • Originally posted by sebfrench76 View Post
                      These are not real french crepes.Even if they look delightful,the ones pictured are made for the tourists.
                      That looks more like French craps.
                      Fried egg in a crepe?!? That looks English to me...
                      One death is a tragedy; one million is a statistic.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by JBark View Post
                        I was in the London suburbs two years ago and remember breakfast and our fish and chips dinner to be higher than the equivalent in the U.S.
                        It does not surprise me at all, the last time I was in London I was quite shocked at the price hike. And to think that Fish & Chips was once the 'poor man's' food...
                        Per Ardua ad Astra

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                        • Originally posted by Hanov View Post
                          That looks more like French craps.
                          Fried egg in a crepe?!? That looks English to me...
                          Hannes,this is what we call a "galette complete".(Gruyere,ham,butter)
                          Wich means you break an egg on it that you eat raw,or sometimes half cooked.
                          This is a basic of the Britanny cooking.
                          That rug really tied the room together

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                          • Wow. I didn't know that. Interesting. I love Gruyere but half raw egg?

                            Pourquoi pas?
                            I often do crepes with cheese. Maybe i'll give it a try. Need to get a real egg first though. Not some supermarket stuff...
                            One death is a tragedy; one million is a statistic.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Hanov View Post
                              Wow. I didn't know that. Interesting. I love Gruyere but half raw egg?

                              Pourquoi pas?
                              I often do crepes with cheese. Maybe i'll give it a try. Need to get a real egg first though. Not some supermarket stuff...
                              This is the same idea that the eggs on pizzas,if i can make a comparison.
                              That rug really tied the room together

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by sebfrench76 View Post
                                Hannes,this is what we call a "galette complete".(Gruyere,ham,butter)
                                Wich means you break an egg on it that you eat raw,or sometimes half cooked.
                                This is a basic of the Britanny cooking.
                                Just shows one can learn something new every day!
                                Per Ardua ad Astra

                                Comment

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