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  • #31
    Originally posted by Salinator View Post
    LOL. I just happen to know about this one because when I was an early teenager, my mother hurt her back and some Chinese neighbor woman made up all kinds of food to feed her, my sister and I. She would insist on "these for mother and sister......this one for you. You must not eat these. These good for Yin and this good for Yang".

    My mom was not in mood for much eating so my older sister was always out at study and homework get-togethers, so I devoured most of it. Didn't realize until later eating food good for Yin is harmful to my Yang. I'm still hoping that woman was just full of it.


    Pretty much same thing happened to me, my wife did not quite find it appetizing and I ended up eating the whole thing and enjoyed every moment of it.

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    • #32
      Mom was British so we were raised on tea and I still have tea the same way, Lipton in bags with a little milk and sugar. I became a coffee drinker in the Army and I’m more particular about it. I like Dunkin Donuts original blend, good coffee for the money, and I grind my own beans and use a plastic filter which is the secret to good coffee and I drink a lot of both.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Persephone View Post
        Has anyone ever tried Goji Berry Tea? It's not bad, give it a try. It's also good for your health.
        Tea =/= Infusion. As I told the woman behind the counter in the Des Moines artisan tea shop. If the actual stuff TEA isn't in it, then it's another infusion, not tea. Tea is an infusion of the tea plant.

        ------

        Coffee (Caw-Fee) is the drink of continentals, fops, and small-time fascists.

        Tea is the drink of the plasterer, the shoe-maker, the smuggler, the carpenter, the builder, the miner, the imperial bureaucrat, the watchmaker, the trader, and the crew of the anti-slavery/anti-French RN ship of war.

        It may be enjoyed by ladies, it is true, using china cups; it may be drank with rum in a chipped enamel mug at 4am by the soldier, it may be put on to brew by the lord in his manor, the yeoman in his house or the stevedore in his lean-to; by the engineer or driver in the cab of their locomotive, or served after a hard day in the field, shooting gypsies and herding beasts.

        Served strong and a little milk, there is no finer drink for the natural production of moral fiber. The everyman may have tea as he wishes, and the expert may peruse the various leaves from across the Emparh in search of a taste, strong blend. (Emparh, not Empire.) From Esquimalt to Halifax to Gibraltar to Christ-Church, Moose Factory to Cape Town and Port Stanley, by all ages, peoples and classes.

        In this role, tea is thoroughly democratic, unlike Coffee which is a drink of collectivist continentals like Mussolini. You must adopt the language of Johnny Foreigner to even order the stuff (I never heard of a latte running wild in These Isles, let alone an 'espresso', by Harry)

        With the proliferation of tea across these isles and the decline of coffee, pantaloons were replaced by trousers, wigs became unfashionable, poetry improved and civilization/railroads/British interest spread across the world.
        By 1840, with tea ubiquitous and coffee confined to secret underground laboratories at Greenwich, the Empire was resplendent.


        With the return of Coffee all I see is narrow-chested fops mooching about 'coffee shops' with their iDevices, listening to 'indie music,' with an 'Americano' in one hand and a copy of The Guardian in the other; no doubt contemplating how next to feel bad for being British or whether to vote Lib Dem or Green. 'Can I have a Cappuccino please maaaan' they mumble into their neck-beards 'I really want to, like, go to India, to like, find myself' they continue.

        It's much the same as being the other side of the channel, except with less fascism, smelly cigarettes or the stabbing of cattle for amusement.
        Last edited by Selous; 13 Oct 14, 08:30.
        ------
        'I would rather be exposed to the inconveniencies attending too much liberty than those attending too small a degree of it.' - Thomas Jefferson

        If you have questions about the forum please check the FAQ/Rules

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Selous View Post
          There are many types of nice tea, some have health benefits. Green tea and Rooibos/Red-Bush, especially can be quite improving. Rooibos is naturally caffeine free. Not sure about weight less mind, but reducing syrups, sugars and hormones from stuff like coffee, soda and beer will help greatly in that department. Lager, soda and non-organic energy drinks are just pure poison. If you're drinking black tea, I recommend Assam (quite strong), but also Darjeeling , Lapsang Souchong (smokey) and Kenyan. Milk and cream are acceptable, but unless you work in construction, avoid the sugar
          I have tried many types of tea. Unsurprisingly working on a tea farm helped me expand my horizons beyond Lipton tea bags. I just got a sampler of 19 different organic teas. I have Assam, Darjeerling, and Kenyan. I didn't get the Lapsang Souchong but I did get other teas from that region, Wu Yi oolong tea as well as others from different parts of china.
          The Europa Barbarorum II team [M2TW] needs YOUR HELP NOW HERE!

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          • #35
            I tried Keemun tea, but found it a bit too...'nutty' sort of taste; I do recommend Lapsang Soushong over the other Chinese teas I've tried, but that's probably just personal preference Chinese green tea can be very beneficial too.
            ------
            'I would rather be exposed to the inconveniencies attending too much liberty than those attending too small a degree of it.' - Thomas Jefferson

            If you have questions about the forum please check the FAQ/Rules

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Persephone View Post

              This may be many things, but a cup of tea is the one thing it is not.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Selous View Post
                Tea =/= Infusion. As I told the woman behind the counter in the Des Moines artisan tea shop. If the actual stuff TEA isn't in it, then it's another infusion, not tea. Tea is an infusion of the tea plant.
                Somebody give that man a Chocolate Hobnob.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by redcoat View Post
                  Somebody give that man a Chocolate Hobnob.
                  Or a slice of battenburg, although I prefer to dunk bourbon creams.
                  Indyref2 - still, "Yes."

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                  • #39
                    I prefer Hard boiled tea, with milk, use only Assam + Darjeeling blend.

                    There are certain Ayurvedic methods involving other ingredients to make it more healthy.

                    http://www.wikihow.com/Make-an-Indian-Tea

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Selous View Post
                      Tea =/= Infusion. As I told the woman behind the counter in the Des Moines artisan tea shop. If the actual stuff TEA isn't in it, then it's another infusion, not tea. Tea is an infusion of the tea plant.
                      Originally posted by redcoat View Post
                      This may be many things, but a cup of tea is the one thing it is not.

                      Touchy about tea, eh?



                      I don't drink goji berry by itself. It is always in a cup of tea...with leaves.

                      This would be too many goji berries for me, 3-4 is more than enough.




                      Or a cup of ginseng tea with just a few goji berries.




                      It's only for flavoring, like how some would put honey in their tea.
                      "Stand for the flag ~ Kneel for the fallen"

                      "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer." ~ Bruce Lee

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by GCoyote View Post
                        Iced Tea - Year round my standard drink in restaurants. No sugar (I'm a Yankee after all. )

                        Hot Tea - I used to drink off the shelf black teas but I also used to swill coffee by the pint. Now I'm more apt to have hot tea during the winter months, often with a bit of honey. My favorite bagged tea for daytime is Constant Comment, a blend with orange and spice that a long ago girlfriend got me started.

                        Before bed I've come to like a cup of peppermint tea. It opens up the sinuses and settles that extra helping of dinner you should not have scarfed down. Another plus is peppermint is very easy to grow.
                        Iced tea is my favorite beverage, and it goes with everything.

                        Peach tea comes second, followed by hot tea in the winter - Earl Grey is my choice for that.


                        Unfortunately, I have to use artificial sweeteners, but them's the breaks!
                        Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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                        • #42
                          I recommend Orange Pekoe as a tea with a good flavour. If you want to try something milder then I recommend Darjeeling. Don't add anything to them the first time you try them. Did you know there are a number of different things you can add - obviously the better known things would be sugar and milk but people have used orange juice, lemon juice, butter to change the flavour or increase the food value.
                          The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants. Thomas Jefferson.

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