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  • Chili Sauces and Sources.

    A discussion on chilies .

    I used to make my own chili rub. It had the usual mix of ingredients, except mine had more black pepper than most. Now I don't bother. Instead, I use various chili sauces that I add after the cooking process, depending on the meal. This is primarily due to the fact that two of my sprogs don't like spiky food, as they call it.

    For example:
    I have cayenne and chili powders to dust my meal if I just want a bit of extra heat.
    I use fresh chillies to make gravy and shephards pie (making sure the membrane and seeds are removed).
    I use chili flakes in soups.
    I use a Malaysian one for beef dishes.
    I use a Chinese chili and garlic one for spring rolls and prawn toast.
    I use another Chinese one for stir fry's.
    I use Sriracha for pork products, but not pork itself.
    I use a Peri-Peri sauce if the dish contains tinned tomatoes or passata.
    I even have one made from Carolina Reaper chilies if I'm feeling particularly masochistic.
    Etc etc.

    I have at least 19 different sources of chili, and I use them all.

    One member here is famous for his favourite brand.

    Do you like chilies? Which do you prefer?
    9
    No. Don't like them.
    0.00%
    0
    One source/sauce is all I need.
    0.00%
    0
    I have a few sources/sauces (2-4).
    33.33%
    3
    I have loads (5+).
    66.67%
    6
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  • #2
    Habaneros are my chili of choice. Just one in a five gallon pot of chili sets it on fire.

    My buddies love my chili till the next day, then they sing a Johnny Cash song...
    Credo quia absurdum.


    Quantum mechanics describes nature as absurd from the point of view of common sense. And yet it fully agrees with experiment. So I hope you can accept nature as She is - absurd! - Richard Feynman

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    • #3
      This sure adds a nice pizzazz to any sauces you have in mind. We go through a gallon a year.

      http://www.cajunpowersauce.com/produ...EECDCCEAC76&i=
      Youthful Exuberance Is No Match For Old Age And Treachery.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Bwaha View Post
        Habaneros are my chili of choice. Just one in a five gallon pot of chili sets it on fire.

        My buddies love my chili till the next day, then they sing a Johnny Cash song...


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        Global Warming & Climate Change Myths: https://www.skepticalscience.com/argument.php

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        • #5
          How does your stomach handle that?
          John

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          • #6
            Current on my "Hell shelf". (So named by my wife.)
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            • #7
              I grow a lot of hot peppers and dry them; I'm harvesting now, in fact.

              I like Big Bomb for fresh hot peppers; they are fleshier and not as hot as they sound.

              I like plain red true Cayennes for drying, they dry well and taste wonderful (okay, smell wonderful: the taste is dynamite). I can't resist always growing some other colors, but they don't dry as well and I'm crazy about powdered cayenne. Making it every year or two fresh is a great taste.

              However, I had a lot left last year, a little jar of crumbles from the grinder about 1/8-1/4 inch square, and now I use them more than anything. Because they give wonderful personality and color to white sauces and foods without putting in much heat, just a little pinch for the color.

              I WAS doing hot sauces I canned, and named things like "You Thought That Red Was From TOMATOES??"

              But we found our stomachs couldn't take it and gave that up. I still use a lot of purchased sauces and heat like ginger in Chinese cooking, but we don't use Dave's anymore.............

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              • #8
                My favorite chili sauce was from Panama. "Salsa Picante de Aji Chombo",
                which was a mixture of Habanero peppers with hot Chinese Mustard (Hereford, actually).

                The best I ever tasted was made by the missus, when she threw a wide variety of hot peppers into the blender, along with garlic. The one I had never seen before was a tiny little bead of a thing about the size of a ladies hat pin head (for those old enough to remember those)

                On this day after Columbus Day, chile pepper lovers should salute those intrepid indigenous farmers of Meso-America who refined those peppers into the infinite varieties that grace the tables of the world.
                dit: Lirelou

                Phong trần mài một lưỡi gươm, Những loài giá áo túi cơm sá ǵ!

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                • #9
                  I rely on the New World for much of my veg. Chili, bell peppers, tomatoes, potatoes and courgettes are some of my most used ingredients.
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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by lirelou View Post
                    My favorite chili sauce was from Panama. "Salsa Picante de Aji Chombo",
                    which was a mixture of Habanero peppers with hot Chinese Mustard (Hereford, actually).

                    The best I ever tasted was made by the missus, when she threw a wide variety of hot peppers into the blender, along with garlic. The one I had never seen before was a tiny little bead of a thing about the size of a ladies hat pin head (for those old enough to remember those)

                    On this day after Columbus Day, chile pepper lovers should salute those intrepid indigenous farmers of Meso-America who refined those peppers into the infinite varieties that grace the tables of the world.
                    True! Happy Columbus Day! [:-)

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                    • #11
                      I really prefer pico de gallo, and make a nice hot one using serrano and habanero peppers.

                      But, around the house there usually is:

                      Tabasco sauce
                      Salsa verde and rojo for tacos,
                      Picante of one sort or another (usually mild for the wife as I don't particularly like Picante).
                      Cholula or similar brand.
                      Homemade pico de gallo
                      Little tubs of salsa from Mexican take out.
                      A chipotle sauce of some sort.

                      The local grocer just started carrying as a norm those Indian "insanity" peppers that are too hot to eat supposedly along with some from the Caribbean that are supposed to be even hotter.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
                        I really prefer pico de gallo, and make a nice hot one using serrano and habanero peppers.

                        But, around the house there usually is:

                        Tabasco sauce
                        Salsa verde and rojo for tacos,
                        Picante of one sort or another (usually mild for the wife as I don't particularly like Picante).
                        Cholula or similar brand.
                        Homemade pico de gallo
                        Little tubs of salsa from Mexican take out.
                        A chipotle sauce of some sort.

                        The local grocer just started carrying as a norm those Indian "insanity" peppers that are too hot to eat supposedly along with some from the Caribbean that are supposed to be even hotter.
                        Tabasco is usually about the right level of heat for me. However, it comes in really tiny bottles. This is when you can get much better, and in larger quantities, for a cheaper price.

                        These days I buy stuff that goes with the food I can now eat. Given that it all has to be pureed these days, consideration of texture is not necessary.

                        I still rate Sriracha (the made up modern version) for pork products, including sausages, salami, bacon etc, except for actual roast pork itself. I don't like Sriracha with beef. I don't think it works for chicken either.

                        However, palates are like music, and each to their own.
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                        Global Warming & Climate Change Myths: https://www.skepticalscience.com/argument.php

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