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How much is a tablespoon?

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  • How much is a tablespoon?

    Isn't it the same everywhere? No.

    In the US a tablespoon is US fluid ounce which works out to be 14.8 ml

    In the UK a tablespoon is 15 ml. Not so very different to the US measure.

    In Australia a tablespoon is 20 ml (⅔ imperial fluid ounce). If you were using an Australian recipe not knowing this there could a noticeable difference in flavour if, for example, you were measuring out vanilla (or other) essence.
    The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants. Thomas Jefferson.

  • #2
    That explains why the homemade semtex didn't go bang.
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    • #3
      "Stand for the flag ~ Kneel for the fallen"

      "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer." ~ Bruce Lee

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      • #4
        I also find that it also varies slightly, depending on the maker of the spoons.














        And don't confused the dessert spoon for the tablespoon...many do.



        "Stand for the flag ~ Kneel for the fallen"

        "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer." ~ Bruce Lee

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        • #5
          Here's a couple more conversion charts and some links for other kitchen related conversions.





          Smitten Kitchen : Temperature, Volume, Ingredients, etc

          Taste.com.au : Metric, Imperial, Australian, Oven, etc

          Cooking.com : Metric, Imperial, Liquid, Dry, etc
          The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants. Thomas Jefferson.

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          • #6
            Dessert spooon

            Here's the reason why Australian measures are easier to remember.

            2 teaspoons = 1 dessert spoon
            2 dessert spoons = 1 tablespoon

            Cup = 250 ml ( litre)

            Some more conversions from Allrecipes.com.au
            The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants. Thomas Jefferson.

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            • #7
              Most people do not know that the US measure is more original. Teaspoons, tablespoon, cups, pints and quarts make up a gallon. The US Gallon is based on the original wine gallon from the UK when the early settlers came to America, but the Brits decided to redefine the Gallon in 1824 as the Imperial Gallon based on ten avoirdupois of water. Just like the English language, weights and measures in the UK was bastardized by French influences after the future Americans said "C'est la vie", left those foggy islands and conquered the brave new world.
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              BoRG

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              • #8
                "How much did you say?"

                Well, all this gobbledegook regarding what makes up a teaspoon/tablespoon, bushel and a peck were learned(hopefully) in grammar school.
                There are numerous other things learned, as it were, at mammy's knee. Any good southern (US) cook will tell you that no recipe is absolutely foolproof or set in stone.
                Consider the following measurements used extensively in rural recipes:
                Dibby,
                Dight/dite,
                eensypeensy,
                hint,
                just a bit,
                and the ever-popular,
                mucka...
                Where do these measurements fall in the scale of conversions?
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                • #9
                  Not to mention the famous "pinch" and "dash", along with "just a taste of".

                  Old recipe books are like trying to read Sanscrit.

                  Unfortunately, I learned to cook the same way, simply seasoning everything "to taste". If I follow an actual recipe, it doesn't come out well at all.
                  Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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