Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Canning & Preserving

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Canning & Preserving

    Are there any members here who do their own canning & preserving? This is a great book on the subject, whether you want to sell/distribute your product or for personal use.

    This guide contain all the information you need to get started, and answered many questions you may have about the process, the science and options (e.g., adding pectin vs. not adding pectin in jams). I like how it simplifies the listing of measurements by using cups and spoons. The guide also provides objective, practical information about selecting jars, canners, storage, ingredients etc.







    This book has some excellent recipes...gives new take to old recipes as well as new ones.





    If you are new to canning I would suggest that you purchase Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving.





    Another Ball book...



    "Stand for the flag ~ Kneel for the fallen"

    "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer." ~ Bruce Lee

  • #2
    Originally posted by Persephone View Post
    Are there any members here who do their own canning & preserving? This is a great book on the subject, whether you want to sell/distribute your product or for personal use.

    This guide contain all the information you need to get started, and answered many questions you may have about the process, the science and options (e.g., adding pectin vs. not adding pectin in jams). I like how it simplifies the listing of measurements by using cups and spoons. The guide also provides objective, practical information about selecting jars, canners, storage, ingredients etc.







    This book has some excellent recipes...gives new take to old recipes as well as new ones.





    If you are new to canning I would suggest that you purchase Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving.





    Another Ball book...



    I used to can ALOT of fruit and vegetables, but gradually got away from it because of time and events.
    "Profanity is but a linguistic crutch for illiterate motherbleepers"

    Comment


    • #3
      When I was growing up my mom grew her own vegetables and fruit, raised chickens, canned tomatoes and made everything from bread to soap. I especially liked her homemade orange marmalade...

      She doesn't dabble in canning anymore, arthritis is setting in.
      "Stand for the flag ~ Kneel for the fallen"

      "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer." ~ Bruce Lee

      Comment


      • #4
        It was a vary common practice in the 50s to grow a large garden and preserve the harvest by canning. it was a matter of economics back then.

        Now, only the Mormons, Amish, and preppers do large scale canning in today's society.
        “Breaking News,”

        “Something irrelevant in your life just happened and now we are going to blow it all out of proportion for days to keep you distracted from what's really going on.”

        Comment


        • #5
          My wife and I do a bit of such every year. Not just canning, but also drying and some freezing. She started doing such about two decades ago when a single mother trying to stretch a food budget, sometimes taking part with gleaners going for unwanted harvestable foods.

          We do a lot of gardening, both as a source of exercise and also to keep a bond with nature, along with she just likes plants and getting dirt under her nails; so have found it a way to save much of what we grow but can't eat before it perishes. She also has some food type sensitivities, so canning our own like ketchup/catsup, pasta sauces, salsa verde, pickles, jams and jellies, etc. is one way to lay in foods for her. Also, many become gift items such as during the recent Holiday Season.

          We have a couple of the books shown and have read the others. There's a few more in our library, I'll present them later.

          Comment


          • #6
            My family has always done that. I'm not doing it because I have no garden. If I did I'd grow something in it. We used to do white current juice as well, among others.
            Wisdom is personal

            Comment


            • #7
              Herren Konfiture

              My landlady in Bosnia during the war turned the trays of fruits I brought home into jam and confiture for me, if I provided her with the sugar.

              I had never realized that so much sugar went into jam, 61% or so. I knew it was sinful but it was delicious

              Back in Holland I sort of gave up on home canning and preserving, also because I couldn't match this alternative I had found:



              It losely translates as 'gentleman's choice', best factory produce of fruits I ever had
              Last edited by Colonel Sennef; 10 May 13, 05:11. Reason: typo
              BoRG

              You may not be interested in War, but War is interested in You - Leon Trotski, June 1919.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Persephone View Post
                Are there any members here who do their own canning & preserving?

                I used to when I had a garden. It was part of my upbringing. Kind of a depression mentality about being self sufficient. So I learned to do all sorts of things in the old school ways. Then I got older and realized that I really didn't enjoy it and was just doing it because I had been taught to do so. From then on I decided to just let HEB do my canning and gardening for me

                Comment


                • #9
                  Garden this year looks to be more bountiful than in recent years*, so "cannin and preserving" started already. For us, a "batch" could be about 4-8 jars, quarts mostly, some pints, and allows that on occasion one will break in the water bath.

                  So far we've done a batch of bread-n-butter pickles, pickled garden veggies(variety), and cucumber dill (sandwich) slices. Also put a bunch of tomatoes, zuchini, carrots and peppers in the dehydrator last nite. This AM the garage smells like a pot of vegetable soup brewing. Tonite will likely do some pickled dill zuchini spears.

                  *One boost to productivity is trying out "straw bale gardening" for the tomatoes and cucumbers. http://strawbalegardens.com/

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I make jerky. That's as close as I come. We've a lot of acres, but the soil has a high clay content, so if you want a garden you have to haul in dirt from someplace else.
                    Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
                      I make jerky. That's as close as I come. We've a lot of acres, but the soil has a high clay content, so if you want a garden you have to haul in dirt from someplace else.
                      We do jerky at times in the dehydrator. That machine gets lots of 'mileage', wife dries fruits and berries for her granola. You could try the straw bale garden method for some fresh veggies, etc. if interested (used bales make great compost).

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
                        We do jerky at times in the dehydrator. That machine gets lots of 'mileage', wife dries fruits and berries for her granola. You could try the straw bale garden method for some fresh veggies, etc. if interested (used bales make great compost).
                        Not with my wife's dogs. They chewed a fifty-foot garden hose into five-foot lenngths, ripped the wiring harness out of my boat trailer, and drag the cast-iron patrio furniture around.

                        A bale of hay wouldn't last an hour.
                        Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          For that high clay soil, mix in some sand and decayed organic material. (The old hay bales work fine even after the dogs tear them up.)

                          In spite of the hail damage early this Summer, I have dug potatoes and pulled onions. Those will last well into next Spring even though the yield is down. Sweet Corn is the best I have seen in years, the extra going into the freezer. String beans, the pole bean type are now yielding. Those plants are over eight feet tall on the fence. Cabbages are ready along with peppers. Carrots to be dug soon. The squash didn't amount to anything due to blight and hail damage. Tomatoes are way down for the same reason. The trees are loaded with apples after there being none due to last year's global warming freeze. Unfortunately, most of them are only good for the deer hunters due to the bruises from hail.

                          Anyhow, a lot of stuff can be done in a small garden and stored where it is cool and dry for winter use.

                          I have also noticed that the local big box food store is now pushing a large canning display which also indicates that there is now a demand again for this old fashioned method of food storage.

                          For the straw bale, use cages for the tomatoes and a trellis for the pickles to climb on and be ready to spray to control blight. And, do use the metal post to support the cages since the plants will get heavy enough that the wind will knock them over. Compost piles are also good for growing big vegetable plants on. Just give them a good pot sized amount of soil to start growing in.

                          Be prepared to fence them in if you have an urban deer problem. They just love tomato, string bean, and most other veggies. A barn cat will keep the rabbits and squirrels under control.
                          Last edited by SRV Ron; 30 Aug 13, 15:34.
                          “Breaking News,”

                          “Something irrelevant in your life just happened and now we are going to blow it all out of proportion for days to keep you distracted from what's really going on.”

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            For those that are unable to grow a garden due to location or apartment living, one can take advantage of the local farm market or roadside stand to purchase quantities of veggies at the end of the day and can, freeze, or dry them. Likewise, take advantage of sales on meat products at the local food store.

                            Only freeze or can what you will use up in a year. Generally, potatoes, carrots, and onions will keep in a cool place until spring and squashes until February.
                            “Breaking News,”

                            “Something irrelevant in your life just happened and now we are going to blow it all out of proportion for days to keep you distracted from what's really going on.”

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I can tomatoes and strawberry jam every year.

                              I add fresh grown basil to the tomatoes when I can them and use them up every winter when I make a huge batch of homemade spaghetti sauce, which I can then freeze.

                              For the strawberry jam I don't use pectin but strawberry jello. Tastes just like putting crushed strawberries on your toast in the morning. It's usually a struggle to get the jam to last past Christmas.
                              Scientists have announced they've discovered a cure for apathy. However no one has shown the slightest bit of interest !!

                              Comment

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              Working...
                              X