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  • South Korean Relations?

    As the crisis grows on the Korean Peninsular over the North Korean nuclear weapons program, it is becoming harder to tell which side South Korea is on. Last year South Koreans elected Roh Moo-Hyun as President, who vowed during the election that SK would not take sides in a war between the US and NK. NK dictator Kim Jong Il has become a folk hero to many of the younger generation in SK.

    In a December survey by the Korean arm of the Gallup polling agency, more South Koreans had a positive view of North Korea - which Bush named as being part of an "axis of evil" - than of the United States. Of those surveyed, 53% had a negative opinion of the United States vs. 37% with a positive view. But 47% felt positively about North Korea vs. 37% with an unfavorable view of the hermit state.

    The change in SK public opinion has come quickly. As late as 1994, 2/3rds of the South Korean public had a favorable view of the United States. By 2002 that percentage was down to 1/3rd.

    The question for the US public is what should our action be. Do we really want to risk 37,000 of our citizens to protect our 'ally' in South Korea in case of war? Or should we leave South Korea all together and let SK figure out for themselves who Kim Jong Il?

    I'm for a withdrawal. If NK and SK can find peace once US forces are withdrawn, great. If NK flattens Seoul and rolls over the country with their massive army, that's OK too.
    23
    Yes, let South Korea make their own decisions
    52.17%
    12
    No, it is too dangerous to abandon South Korea
    47.83%
    11
    Last edited by Chuck?; 19 Mar 03, 16:44.
    "There is no great genius without some touch of madness."

    Seneca (5 BC - 65 AD)

  • #2
    I'm not able to register my vote.Though i say that if the people of the south see us as the cause of the problems there and want us out then we should leave.They can then enjoy the hospitality of their northern brethrens

    Comment


    • #3
      A lot of people have problems voting here.
      "There is no great genius without some touch of madness."

      Seneca (5 BC - 65 AD)

      Comment


      • #4
        I also voted to allow South Korea to test the waters on their own. With one proviso however.
        Should US forces leave South Korea to their own fate, Japan would have to be assured of a continuing US comittment to its security.

        The strategic importance of Japan is such that firm and absolutely concrete presence in the area would have to be maitained.
        Scientists have announced they've discovered a cure for apathy. However no one has shown the slightest bit of interest !!

        Comment


        • #5
          So far, we have pursued a policy concerning North Korea's nuclear weapons program, that has South Korea and Japan operating that the forefront.

          It's important to let South Korea to act more independently. The US can't maintain an indefinite presence; or at least we should not tailor our policy to support such an ideal. South Korea must be allowed to determine its own fate. Our roll should be limited to support, with a mutual understanding of our American interest. Eventually, America should work to leave the Korean Pennisula. However, that is not possible at the moment.

          The true test of a countries strength and prolonged existence comes when it stands on its own two feet. We should not allow our fear that South Korea will fall deter us. Our long term strategic policy must require greater independence.
          "As soon as men decide that all means are permitted to fight an evil, then their good becomes indistinguishable from the evil that they set out to destroy."-Christopher Dawson - The Judgement of Nations, 1942

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Chuck
            A lot of people have problems voting here.
            They have the same problem in North Korea!
            http://www.irelandinhistory.blogspot.ie/

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Chuck
              A lot of people have problems voting here.

              What error messages are people getting? This is the first I have heard of this problem. Let me know and I will see what (if anything) can be done to help out.
              Our forefathers died to give us freedom, not free stuff.

              I write books about zombies as E.E. Isherwood. Check me out at ZombieBooks.net.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Wolfe Tone


                They have the same problem in North Korea!
                "As soon as men decide that all means are permitted to fight an evil, then their good becomes indistinguishable from the evil that they set out to destroy."-Christopher Dawson - The Judgement of Nations, 1942

                Comment


                • #9
                  I think...

                  Originally posted by Siberian HEAT



                  What error messages are people getting? This is the first I have heard of this problem. Let me know and I will see what (if anything) can be done to help out.
                  Hello,

                  I think it has to do with the cookies.

                  Try this: go to the privacy option screen in the internet settings in your browser, and set it to accept both first and third-party cookies.

                  Ever since I did this, I had no problems posting from my email box and voting on the polls also.

                  Let me know if this doesn't work....

                  Thanks,
                  Dan
                  Major James Holden, Georgia Badgers Militia of Rainbow Regiment, American Civil War

                  "Aim small, miss small."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    This may sound pretty basic, but after you make a selection for your vote, you have to click on the "vote" button.
                    I've made this mistake myself.
                    Scientists have announced they've discovered a cure for apathy. However no one has shown the slightest bit of interest !!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I believe that S.K. should be allowed to handle the N.K. however they want. If they want our forces great. If not, fine. We will support them if they want our aid in their defense.

                      It should be made clear however that we will not be doing any apeasment of N.K. If S.K. wants to buy them off or whatever, again, fine. But none of our money or any other concessions from us.

                      We may have to let S.K. know when we are about to have to blockade N.K. or strike their weapons or sites. Oh and by the way if we have to blockade N.K. and S.K. is trading with them they will have to be blockaded too.
                      ...a man that can stand up for a principle and sit down on his own stool.
                      -the Firesign Theatre

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I voted "Yes." If they can subsidize their steel industry, ship building industry and almost everything else then they can afford to arm themselves enough to deter a poor country such as North Korea.

                        Plus, considering all the militant students having enough free time to stage violent protests, they obviously could be doing something more productive such as serving in their armed forces.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I voted No.

                          Unless Seoul specifically and clearly ask for a complete and unconditional withdrawal of U.S. forces from South Korea, I think the U.S. should resist such an idea.

                          I strongly believe the U.S. forces there serve as an effective deterrent to North Korea. Without those forces, we don't know what could happen.

                          And if an invasion or war would happen, I believe the unfolding of events would probably trigger an intervention of American forces for the sake and stability of the region. If that happens, previous withdrawal from the Korean peninsula would only make matters worse.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Tzar
                            I voted No.

                            Unless Seoul specifically and clearly ask for a complete and unconditional withdrawal of U.S. forces from South Korea, I think the U.S. should resist such an idea.

                            I strongly believe the U.S. forces there serve as an effective deterrent to North Korea. Without those forces, we don't know what could happen.

                            And if an invasion or war would happen, I believe the unfolding of events would probably trigger an intervention of American forces for the sake and stability of the region. If that happens, previous withdrawal from the Korean peninsula would only make matters worse.
                            I agree with some of your points. However the South Koreans have become soft over the last few decades and I don't my country to pay the price for it. If we do withdrawal it must mean total withdrawal; no coming back if a war starts. The 37,000 troops isn't much really - it's the 370,000 troops which would be sent to save those 37,000 that's a bigger problem.
                            "There is no great genius without some touch of madness."

                            Seneca (5 BC - 65 AD)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              South Korea can defend itself just fine.

                              What they didn't need was Bush coming into office and deciding that all of South Korea's diplomatic efforts were tanked in an instant when Bush decided to blow all the political capital that had been so carefully accumulated without so much as even a word of mention to the people who it affects most.

                              You can call it appeasement or buying them off, but that's just myopic.

                              This article goes a ways to explaining why Americans find themselves increasingly isolated.

                              The Arrogant Empire
                              "Experience should teach us to be most on our guard to protect liberty when the government’s purposes are beneficent. Men born to freedom are naturally alert to repel invasion of their liberty by evil-minded rulers. The greatest dangers to liberty lurk in insidious encroachment by men of zeal, well-meaning but without understanding."

                              – Associate Justice Louis D. Brandeis, Olmstead vs. United States.

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