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  • Kurd PM "French and Russians to lose Iraqi oil"

    http://www.upi.com/view.cfm?StoryID=...4-095811-8865r


    Kurd PM: French, Russians to lose Iraq oil
    By Martin Walker
    UPI Chief International Correspondent
    From the International Desk
    Published 3/14/2003 4:28 PM
    View printer-friendly version


    WASHINGTON, March 14 (UPI) -- French and Russian oil and gas contracts signed with the Saddam Hussein regime in Iraq "will not be honored," Barhim Salih, a leading Iraqi Kurdish official, said in Washington Friday, just before a series of high-level meetings with Bush administration officials.

    "A new Iraqi government should not honor any of these contracts, signed against the interests of the Iraqi people. The new Iraqi government should respect those who stood by us, and not those who stood beside the dictator," added Salih, who is prime minister in the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan government that controls Iraq's eastern Kurdish area.

    Russian and French oil corporations have each signed draft contracts with Iraq, to come into force only when the United Nations sanctions are lifted, for exploration, development and exploitation of the country's energy resources -- which geologists believe may be the world's second largest after Saudi Arabia. The value of the draft contracts, if fully taken up, is estimated to have a potential of more than $20 billion.

    Although there have been dark hints that French and Russian opposition to a second U.N. resolution in the Security Council could have economic consequences, this is the first clear threat from a leading opposition figure from inside Iraq that their oil contracts will not be honored.

    "France and Russia should make a decision where they stand," Barhim Salih added, speaking to U.S. policy experts and reporters at the prestigious Council on Foreign Relations Friday. "We would rather see them stand with us. They cannot have it both ways."

    Salih is expected to be one of the leading political figures in Iraq, along with the PUK's leader Jalal Talabani, after the fall of Iraq's current leader Saddam Hussein. The Kurdish enclave in northern Iraq, protected for a decade by British and U.S. warplanes enforcing a no-fly zone, has become an island of prosperity and nascent democratic ways.

    While there is no guarantee that Salih will be elected to a high position in whatever new government emerges in Baghdad after Saddam, the Iraqi Kurds -- both in the PUK area and those in the region controlled by the Kurdistan Democratic Party and its leader Masud Barzani -- constitute the best-organized opposition in Iraq and are expected to play a decisive role.

    Prime Minister Salih went on for talks with senior Bush administration officials on plans for rebuilding post-war Iraq and for creating political stability. His top priority was to dissuade the Bush administration from giving the Turkish military any role in the Kurdish region on northern Iraq.

    "Turkish military involvement will invite other neighbors to intervene, like Syria and Iran. This would open Pandora's box. It would create havoc, and compromise the real mission, which is to install representative government and democracy in a stable Iraq, at peace with its neighbors."

    He also said that the 70,000 Kurdish troops, mostly with light weapons, at his government's disposal would come under U.S. command in the event of war. And he confirmed intelligence reports that Iraqi troops had affixed explosives to the oil wells near Mosul and Kirkuk.

    "Saddam wants to instigate an environmental catastrophe. This is his Armageddon," Salih said. "We are in touch with the Iraqi military, telling them to ignore orders to destroy the wells. We think very few of them will fight. Senior officers at border crossing have asked us to let them know when the moment (for attack) comes so they can escape."

    Prime Minister Salih, 42, with a Ph. D in computer science from a British university, said he did "not expect to see Western-style democracy overnight, but some form of representative government will emerge, based on a federal system with wide measures of autonomy for the various regions."


    Copyright © 2001-2003 United Press International
    "Speaking here in my capacity as a polished, sophisticated European as well, it seems to me the laugh here is on the polished, sophisticated Europeans. They think Americans are fat, vulgar, greedy, stupid, ambitious and ignorant and so on. And they've taken as their own Michael Moore, as their representative American, someone who actually embodies all of those qualities." - Christopher Hitchens

  • #2
    Now that's poetic justice at it's finest.

    Scientists have announced they've discovered a cure for apathy. However no one has shown the slightest bit of interest !!

    Comment


    • #3
      Serves them right!

      Hello,

      Serves them right! France and Russia must know they shouldn't cross the mighty United States. Now, they're about to see their oil contracts being shredded, doom on them. My advice to them, would be simply jump on the bandwagon with the US, that is if they want to get what they desperately need from Iraq.

      If the war goes well, then it will definitely hurt Russia and France the most, the new Iraq and the United States get the most gains.

      Well, I don't think Great Britain's Tony Blair was supporting Bush because he believed that Saddam has WMDs, but wanted a foothold in Middle East by acquiring one or two oil fields as a spoil of war, happens all the time. Then Great Britain will dominance the voice in Europe, knocking out France and Russia in process. That's why France and Russia are desperately salvaging anything they can save. I suspect in the coming days, France and Russia will have to concede something if they want to get a piece of economic pie in postwar Iraq.

      Dan
      Major James Holden, Georgia Badgers Militia of Rainbow Regiment, American Civil War

      "Aim small, miss small."

      Comment


      • #4
        We should not get to excited by the fact that French and Russia companies won't have their share of the oil contracts.

        France and Russia will save quite a lot of billions by not participating in the war and in the occupation and reconstruction of Iraq.

        The White House already knows that the revenues of Iraqi oil won't be enough to rebuild Iraq. Too much has to be done, and the American taxpayer will have to bear the bulk of this reconstruction.

        In the short to medium term (and perhaps even in the long run depending on how events will unfold in a conquered Iraq), from a purely financial perspective, America stands to lose much more than France and Russia.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Tzar
          We should not get to excited by the fact that French and Russia companies won't have their share of the oil contracts.

          France and Russia will save quite a lot of billions by not participating in the war and in the occupation and reconstruction of Iraq.

          The White House already knows that the revenues of Iraqi oil won't be enough to rebuild Iraq. Too much has to be done, and the American taxpayer will have to bear the bulk of this reconstruction.

          In the short to medium term (and perhaps even in the long run depending on how events will unfold in a conquered Iraq), from a purely financial perspective, America stands to lose much more than France and Russia.
          Who cares, the point the Prime Minister of Kurdistan says he has 70,000 troops ready to fight along side the U.S. The Iraqi people want to get rid of Saddam and they resent the peaceniks for enabling Saddam to stay in power.



          Salih Says 70,000 Kurds Will Fight Alongside U.S. Troops

          By Barry Schweid The Associated Press
          Published: Mar 14, 2003

          WASHINGTON (AP) - A Kurdish leader predicted Friday the quick collapse of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's government if war comes. He said 70,000 Kurds were prepared to fight alongside U.S. troops.
          Barhim Salih, prime minister of the Kurdistan regional government, said the Iraqi army and even some of Saddam's Republican Guard would quit in what he predicted would be a short war.

          Salih told reporters at the Council on Foreign Relations, a private research group, that Saddam had booby-trapped Iraqi oil fields in Kirkuk and probably elsewhere and would have them blown up as he sought refuge outside the country.

          "We have to expect the worst of him," Salih said.

          "The war will be relatively short," the Kurdish leader said. "The bulk of the Iraqi army and much of the guard will not fight."

          In Washington for talks with Bush administration officials, Salih said he hoped to discourage any U.S. invitation to Turkey to send troops into northern Iraq, which has a heavy Kurdish population.

          If Turkey should intervene, so will Iran, Salih said, "opening a Pandora's Box" that would harm prospects for a transition to an independent, democratic government in Baghdad.

          The Bush administration has asked Turkey to let U.S. troops to launch an invasion of northern Iraq from Turkish territory. The Turkish government approved the recommendation, but its parliament rejected the request.

          In the meantime, U.S. and Turkish officials discussed this week the U.S. use of Turkish airspace for attacks on Iraq.

          Asked about Salih's opposition to stationing Turkish troops in northern Iraq, State Department spokesman Richard Boucher said: "We understand their point of view. ... We've been in close touch with Turkish authorities about the situation."

          Boucher said the Bush administration had made it "very, very clear we remain strongly opposed to any unilateral action by any party in northern Iraq, and that's a position the Turks understand clearly, as well."

          AP-ES-03-14-03 1749EST
          "Speaking here in my capacity as a polished, sophisticated European as well, it seems to me the laugh here is on the polished, sophisticated Europeans. They think Americans are fat, vulgar, greedy, stupid, ambitious and ignorant and so on. And they've taken as their own Michael Moore, as their representative American, someone who actually embodies all of those qualities." - Christopher Hitchens

          Comment


          • #6
            France, Europe, or Russia will not have to ask anything after the end of the war. The USA alone will not be able to rebuild the country , and will need the help of the rest of the world, particularly of rich countries like Europe, Canada, even RussiaÖ
            Another time everybody will have to seat around a table and discuss to obtain a good deal. And what happen those last months clearly shows to the United States that if she want help from other states, she has to listen what those countries have to say. Of course that works for France or Russia too.
            Iím maybe wrong but I donít think that America can neither rebuild Iraq nor exploit oil alone. For example the oilfields can only be exploited by a very big consortium which would gather all the oil cpies of the world, French, American, Russian, Arab...

            At the same time itís funny to say that France or Russia are against a war on Iraq because they want to protect their agreements with Saddam. The best way to keep those contracts would be to go with America and invade Iraq. Except of course if the Americans want to have everything for them and donít care about any allies who would have helped them.

            La Palice.
            Monsieur de La Palice est mort
            Mort devant Pavie.
            Un quart d'heure avant sa mort
            Il ťtait encore en vie...

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by LaPalice
              France, Europe, or Russia will not have to ask anything after the end of the war. The USA alone will not be able to rebuild the country , and will need the help of the rest of the world, particularly of rich countries like Europe, Canada, even RussiaÖ
              Another time everybody will have to seat around a table and discuss to obtain a good deal. And what happen those last months clearly shows to the United States that if she want help from other states, she has to listen what those countries have to say. Of course that works for France or Russia too.
              Iím maybe wrong but I donít think that America can neither rebuild Iraq nor exploit oil alone. For example the oilfields can only be exploited by a very big consortium which would gather all the oil cpies of the world, French, American, Russian, Arab...

              At the same time itís funny to say that France or Russia are against a war on Iraq because they want to protect their agreements with Saddam. The best way to keep those contracts would be to go with America and invade Iraq. Except of course if the Americans want to have everything for them and donít care about any allies who would have helped them.

              La Palice.

              The Iraqi's can rebuild their country. I surely would not want the international community involved in the rebuilding of Iraq. Everything the U.N. touches turns to crap. We want to have success here, and that can only mean leaving the U.N. out of any post Saddam situation. It's best to let the Iraqi people handle it, and quite frankly it is the height of arrogance when people claim the Iraqis would be unable to rebuild their own country.

              The U.S. doesn't care about oil. Most Americans have resigned to the fact that we probably won't even be using oil for much longer, so it's not really in our long term interests. It won't be long before the freemarket produces some revolutionary new type of fuel or enegy source that will prove to be more convenient and CHEAPER for the consumer. The demand for that type of invention is so high that it is only a matter of time before it materializes as a result of market forces.

              America isn't looking for "help" from any of these countries. If we don't consult them we're "ignoring the international community". If we come to them looking to include them we're seen as a bully, "forcing" them to get invoved against their will. I have long said that its time for the U.S. to find some new allies, since we are simply no longer ideologically allied with much of Europe and no longer have common national security interests. The United States should unite with those nations which share similar times.
              The "coalition of the resented" as i have referred to it (Israel, India, Taiwan, Colombia.)
              "Speaking here in my capacity as a polished, sophisticated European as well, it seems to me the laugh here is on the polished, sophisticated Europeans. They think Americans are fat, vulgar, greedy, stupid, ambitious and ignorant and so on. And they've taken as their own Michael Moore, as their representative American, someone who actually embodies all of those qualities." - Christopher Hitchens

              Comment


              • #8
                The article helps explain France and Germany's reluctance to go to war. If the United States were to promise the security of those contracts after the war, I believe France might back down in the UN. However, Bush has already arranged meetings between the opposition leaders and British and American oil executives to hammer out production plans. The US also made clear it's plans to upgrade Iraqi oil facilities to allow more productive operations.

                As LaPalice stated, Europe will have a say about Iraq no matter what. Countries are limiting their exposure now to preserve their political position later. Participating in the invasion commits them to the end. If countries wait until after the war, they will be less visible politically and retain the option to withdraw if necessary. Britian and the United States won't have that option.

                To me, the article supports the case for war. France and Germany opposition to sanctions would only increase because of their trade ties with Iraq. So their argument about containment is just a smoke screen to prevent war, and secure their economies.

                As I've stated many times before, no one cares about the poor Iraqi people except the civilian population. The governments are exploiting logical conerns and fears for "the better good."
                "As soon as men decide that all means are permitted to fight an evil, then their good becomes indistinguishable from the evil that they set out to destroy."-Christopher Dawson - The Judgement of Nations, 1942

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by kid kool



                  The Iraqi's can rebuild their country. I surely would not want the international community involved in the rebuilding of Iraq. Everything the U.N. touches turns to crap. We want to have success here, and that can only mean leaving the U.N. out of any post Saddam situation. It's best to let the Iraqi people handle it, and quite frankly it is the height of arrogance when people claim the Iraqis would be unable to rebuild their own country.

                  The U.S. doesn't care about oil. Most Americans have resigned to the fact that we probably won't even be using oil for much longer, so it's not really in our long term interests. It won't be long before the freemarket produces some revolutionary new type of fuel or enegy source that will prove to be more convenient and CHEAPER for the consumer. The demand for that type of invention is so high that it is only a matter of time before it materializes as a result of market forces.

                  America isn't looking for "help" from any of these countries. If we don't consult them we're "ignoring the international community". If we come to them looking to include them we're seen as a bully, "forcing" them to get invoved against their will. I have long said that its time for the U.S. to find some new allies, since we are simply no longer ideologically allied with much of Europe and no longer have common national security interests. The United States should unite with those nations which share similar times.
                  The "coalition of the resented" as i have referred to it (Israel, India, Taiwan, Colombia.)
                  Of course the Iraqis can rebuild their country. But they canít do it alone. Even if they control the oilfields for themselves, they would need the big cpies to exploit them, and then rebuild the country with the money. And those cpies donít work for free, on the contrary.
                  After two wars and a 12 years old embargo Iraq will need the international community to assist her when time to rebuild will come. As oil cpies, International community donít work for free when there is all this oil in the soil, you can be sure of that.

                  Anyway I donít think that the Americans are going to invade Iraq, eliminate Saddam and then leave the country. You donít go for oil only, itís more complicate of course. But America want a peaceful Middle East, which is still the main oil resource of the world, and the best way for that is having a military presence in the region. To have a peaceful Middle East, America must have a peaceful Iraq, and quickly. But she canít pay all the price, she needs help from countries richer than Israel or Bolivia. And those countries want to give their views on the subject.

                  La Palice.
                  Monsieur de La Palice est mort
                  Mort devant Pavie.
                  Un quart d'heure avant sa mort
                  Il ťtait encore en vie...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by LaPalice


                    Of course the Iraqis can rebuild their country. But they canít do it alone. Even if they control the oilfields for themselves, they would need the big cpies to exploit them, and then rebuild the country with the money. And those cpies donít work for free, on the contrary.
                    After two wars and a 12 years old embargo Iraq will need the international community to assist her when time to rebuild will come. As oil cpies, International community donít work for free when there is all this oil in the soil, you can be sure of that.

                    Anyway I donít think that the Americans are going to invade Iraq, eliminate Saddam and then leave the country. You donít go for oil only, itís more complicate of course. But America want a peaceful Middle East, which is still the main oil resource of the world, and the best way for that is having a military presence in the region. To have a peaceful Middle East, America must have a peaceful Iraq, and quickly. But she canít pay all the price, she needs help from countries richer than Israel or Bolivia. And those countries want to give their views on the subject.

                    La Palice.
                    The Bolivian influence in the Middle East is a neccesity. Only with a Bolvivian slant can the key objectives be met. A corrupt puppet American government that will milk the country dry.

                    Comment

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