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  • Best Horror Fiction

    Taking from the Politics Central thread Where the conversation was veering into the land of horror fiction... which in certain ways was fitting but not proper...

    So I figured I'd start it here...

    What's your Favourite Horror Fiction story or book? it can be classic or modern.

    Mine has to be : 'At The Mountains of Madness' by H.P. Lovecraft.



    This was and still is an excellent story from a time when the Genre was known as Weird Fiction. the Horror and Science Fiction Genres were not yet classifications in use.



    Set in the Antarctic wastes in the 1920's it incorporates the alien landscape of the unknown Antarctic and encounters with lifeforms truly alien to ourselves, Ancient and unknowable. Archtypical of what would become the Horror Fiction Genre Lovecraft's piece is spellbinding in his detail and prose.





    It is an example of a master at work and is a Story that continues to thrill and grasp the imagination even today.
    Last edited by Arthwys; 10 Jun 10, 09:32.
    BoRG
    "... and that was the last time they called me Freakboy Moses"

  • #2
    I liked The Shadow out of Time... it's one of the few that also lends itself to an easy adaptation to the screen.
    It's a shame that his books were used to make such rotten movies.

    Shadow over Innsmouth was a masterpiece. It also had the highest actual horror content of any of them. It was exciting.

    Comment


    • #3
      mine has to be
      the saga of the swamp thing
      by allan moore from dc

      http://uk.comics.ign.com/articles/677/677753p1.html
      FOR THE LOVE OF ALL THAT IS HOLY
      BAN ME NOW

      Comment


      • #4
        Lovecraft is without a doubt the best author in the field, though I think it is classified, at least today, as science fiction.
        Wisdom is personal

        Comment


        • #5
          Horror fiction has been a favorite of mine since I was a kid & could read. I tend to prefer short stories & novellas over full blown books, but there are exceptions. Lovecraft is my favorite author for horror fiction-I know of noone who considers Lovecraft "science fiction"....wierd, horror, occult, but not sci-fi. If I had to pick a book that encompassed my favorites, I would say "Necronomicon: The Weird Tales of H. P. Lovecraft"
          A gorgeous book & a great collection of Lovecraft's best stories:
          NIGHT-GAUNTS
          DAGON
          THE STATEMENT OF RANDOLPH CARTER
          THE DOOM THAT CAME TO SARNATH
          THE CATS OF ULTHAR
          THE NAMELESS CITY
          HERBERT WEST-REANIMATOR
          THE MUSIC OF ERICH ZANN
          THE LURKING FEAR
          THE HOUND
          THE RATS IN THE WALLS
          UNDER THE PYRAMIDS
          THE UNNAMABLE
          IN THE VAULT
          THE OUTSIDER
          THE HORROR AT RED HOOK
          THE COLOUR OUT OF SPACE
          PICKMAN'S MODEL
          THE CALL OF CTHULHU
          COOL AIR
          THE SHUNNED HOUSE
          THE SILVER KEY
          THE DUNWICH HORROR
          THE WHISPERER IN DARKNESS
          THE STRANGE HIGH HOUSE IN THE MIST
          THE DREAMS IN THE WITCH-HOUSE
          FROM BEYOND
          THROUGH THE GATES OF THE SILVER KEY (with E. Hoffmann Price)
          AT THE MOUNTAINS OF MADNESS
          THE SHADOW OVER INNSMOUTH
          THE SHADOW OUT OF TIME
          THE HAUNTER OF THE DARK
          THE THING ON THE DOORSTEP
          THE CASE OF CHARLES DEXTER WARD
          THE DREAM-QUEST OF UNKNOWN KADATH
          TO A DREAMER

          Of course, some of his protoges were also great-August Derelith & Clark Ashton Smith to name but 2.

          For modern times there are 2 authors that really stand out for me-Richard Matheson & Stephen King. For King, I love "Night Shift" , his first collection of horror short stories, including:
          "Jerusalem's Lot" (1978): A Lovecraft tribute, written in epistolary format, that delves into a bit of the sordid history of `Salem's Lot. King manages to convey the disturbing atmosphere to the precisely right degree, with no overkill. This one remains a favorite for me, in no small part because King nails the conventions and language of nineteenth-century epistolary writing perfectly.
          "Graveyard Shift" (1970): Rats. That's it, really, although King's rats exceed ordinary expectations, having simultaneously evolved and devolved into monstrous parodies of their mundane antecedents. It has pretensions of being a distillation of management-employee tensions, but that's just a mechanism to get the protagonist into the basement. The rodents are the real stars of the show.
          "Night Surf" (1974): A companion to The Stand. More of a mood piece than a story, since the conclusion for these young people seems to be forgone. It also serves as a character study; how would you behave if the end was coming and you had nothing to do except wait?
          "I Am the Doorway" (1971): An astronaut returns from space to discover several eyes peering out of each of his hands; someone is using him as a conduit through which to observe our world and, eventually, to act upon it. This is a horror-writer's unique take on the well-worn science-fictional idea of possession by aliens. One of King's more unique stories, and, as it's never been a TV segment or feature film, unjustly unheralded.
          "The Mangler" (1972): An industrial laundry machine becomes possessed by a demonic force. Though the police investigation is fun to follow, the ending is a little overwrought; even if you can manage to imagine a laundry machine rampaging down the street of its own accord, the image seems so ludicrous that it's difficult not to laugh.
          "The Boogeyman" (1973): A psychologist's patient discusses his fear of the boogeyman who has killed each of his children. When I read this as a youngster, I was perhaps a little dense because I thought the ending was ridiculous; this particular doctor just happens to be the boogeyman in disguise? Of course, it's obvious in retrospect that King is showing us a severe case of denial--most likely.
          "Gray Matter" (1973): A guy drinks bad beer and begins to transform into a gelatinous creature. This is a straight monster story, with no real resolution. However, as is often the case with King, the journey--the set-up and delivery of the idea--is the real treat, with the threat posed by the monster serving only as justification for telling the story.
          "Battleground" (1972): A hitman bumps off a toy executive and, in return, receives a package containing toy soldiers, which turn on him. This has always been a favorite of mine, as a youngster and today; it's so wonderfully over the top, and sports a killer ending.
          "Trucks" (1973): The trucks come to life and take over the world, forcing humanity to serve them. You've seen this as Maximum Overdrive, starring Emilio Estevez, though this original version has a negative, or perhaps slightly ambiguous at best, ending that's more befitting a King short story.
          "Sometimes They Come Back" (1974): Figuring that only the dead can fight the dead, a teacher haunted by the since-dead thugs who killed his brother attempts to summon his brother for help. When I was a kid, the depiction of the ritual absolutely freaked me out; I had to stop reading for a while. That was the first time I'd really read something that grisly and graphic.
          "Strawberry Spring" (1975): A college campus is stalked by a serial killer. You jaded latecomers will see the ending coming a mile away, but only the hopelessly unimaginative and literal-minded among you will let that ruin your enjoyment of the story.
          "The Ledge" (1976): To remain alive and a free man, a tennis pro must walk around the top ledge of a high-rise apartment complex. There's nothing supernatural here, but, despite its weird originality, this piece would have been right at home as a segment of Alfred Hitchcock's television series--to which it owes a thematic debt (and indeed, it does appear as a segment of the film Cat's Eye).
          "The Lawnmower Man" (1975): What starts out as ordinary lawn care takes a decidedly bizarre and disturbing turn. This one never really did it for me; this is a rare case in which I would need a little more explanation or exposition before I could buy the premise. It's just weirdness for the sake of weirdness. Incidentally, don't confuse this with the film of the same name, which, despite having King's name plastered all over it, has literally nothing in common with the story except the title (and I thought The Running Man was bad; at least the main character retained his name in that story's translation to the screen).
          "Quitters, Inc." (1978): Nightmarish tale of a firm that offers relief from addiction, by any means necessary. Yet another homage to Hitchcock, and yet another segment from the film Cat's Eye.
          "I Know What You Need" (1976): The mysterious new man in her life seems to know exactly what she needs. This was originally published in Cosmopolitan, which says something about how King's career has evolved but says a lot more about how Cosmopolitan has evolved.
          "Children of the Corn" (1977): Forget about the film, and especially about the sequels it spawned. King's story exhibits much more control, as he secrets of the little town are gradually revealed.
          "The Last Rung On the Ladder" (1978): A man's powerful reminiscence of an episode in which he saved his sister's life. The tightly-knit nature of their relationship, and the bitter ending, prefigure The Body (aka Stand By Me).
          "The Man Who Loved Flowers" (1977): A man in love wanders the streets, looking for his beloved. Again, you may see the twist coming, but as they say, getting there is half the fun.
          "One for the Road" (1977): Yet another, more contemporary, visit to the abandoned town of Jerusalem's Lot. Now the vampires have moved in.
          "The Woman in the Room" (1978): One of many tales in which King works through his mother's death. Shifting narrative sections add weight to this story of an assisted suicide.

          My favorite full blown book by king still remains "Salem's Lot".

          Prior to King was Richard Matheson, who heavily influenced King. I have 3 collections of his best Novellas/short stories which I highly recommend:
          "I am Legend"
          "Nightmare At 20,000 Feet: Horror Stories By Richard Matheson "
          "Duel"

          Besides these, I have over a hundred various horror collections spread over 2 bookshelves. Civil War may be a passion for me, but horror short stories are some of the best things to curl up in a blanket & read.
          The muffled drums sad roll has beat the soldier's last tatoo. No more on life's parade shall meet that brave and fallen few.

          Comment


          • #6
            The Mountains of Maddness is REAL!!!

            Mysterious Mountains Hidden Beneath Antarctic Ice Revealed

            http://news.yahoo.com/s/livescience/...ticicerevealed


            What the pictures reveal, Bell said, is spectacular: a dramatic landscape of rocky summits, deep river valleys, and liquid, not frozen, lakes, all hidden beneath the ice.


            Holy crap...the Shoggoths are definitely living there...
            Last edited by Intranetusa; 11 Jun 10, 11:19.
            Surrender? NutZ!
            -Varro

            Regard your soldiers as your children, and they will follow you into the deepest valleys; look on them as your own beloved sons, and they will stand by you even unto death. -Sun Tzu

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by ROOBARB View Post
              mine has to be
              the saga of the swamp thing
              by allan moore from dc

              http://uk.comics.ign.com/articles/677/677753p1.html
              I followed that back in the 80s, it was the only comic that I ever was interested in. I would be amazed if it was still running, unless Constantine get back into it.

              Comment


              • #8
                I'm with you...

                I have to go with Lovecraft. In my senior year at college I managed to read his books, write a 20pg or so paper, and get credit for an upper level history class. That was a sweet deal! The course was Histroical Perspectives Through Science Fiction. It all worked out quite nicely

                Lovecraft is a master. I remember having some freaky dreams when I was really into the paper.

                If you haven't ever read any of his work I highly recommend it!
                Save America!! Impeach Obama!!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Exorcist View Post
                  I followed that back in the 80s, it was the only comic that I ever was interested in. I would be amazed if it was still running, unless Constantine get back into it.
                  well constanine has his own book now
                  but for me its more about the writer and he stop writeing for swap thing a long time ago
                  try from hell
                  its very good
                  FOR THE LOVE OF ALL THAT IS HOLY
                  BAN ME NOW

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I have never read a horror novel sorry to say but the best horror movie I have seen would have to be wolf creek thats just bloody scary specialy after the Peter Falconio murder if you believe Bradley John Murdoch killed him or not I found this film s loads scarier than the Texas Chainsaw messicare ands the saw movies
                    http://g.bf3stats.com/pc/1LP76r6C/melba_101.png

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                    • #11
                      Hey Arthwys, come time for the San Diego Comic Con, July 22-25th, you will want to keep an eye on the entertainment news. Guillermo del Toro has confirmed that he will reveal his next movie project there since he has dropped out as the director of "The Hobbit". Prior to him accepting that, he had said the next movie he would do would be "At the Mountains of Madness" & the rumour mill is saying that he will go back to that project.
                      The muffled drums sad roll has beat the soldier's last tatoo. No more on life's parade shall meet that brave and fallen few.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by hellboy30 View Post
                        Hey Arthwys, come time for the San Diego Comic Con, July 22-25th, you will want to keep an eye on the entertainment news. Guillermo del Toro has confirmed that he will reveal his next movie project there since he has dropped out as the director of "The Hobbit". Prior to him accepting that, he had said the next movie he would do would be "At the Mountains of Madness" & the rumour mill is saying that he will go back to that project.
                        Indeed I remember that being touted around the web a couple of years ago, but I'm really hoping he gets that off the ground. With his directoral style and the texture he puts into his films I think he could really make something of it.
                        BoRG
                        "... and that was the last time they called me Freakboy Moses"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Here we go, just as I heard:
                          http://www.darkhorizons.com/news/178...ns-of-madness-
                          del Toro, Cameron & The "Mountains of Madness"

                          By Garth Franklin Thursday July 29th 2010 02:22PM

                          I'll try to put this into an expression you can easily understand - "OOOOH GOD YESSSSSS!".

                          Guillermo del Toro is set to direct and James Cameron is negotiating to produce a 3D adaptation of H.P. Lovecraft's "At the Mountains of Madness" reports Deadline.

                          The atmospheric 1931 story follows explorers in Antarctica who uncover the remains of highly evolved creatures neither plant or animal. Investigating a gigantic mountain range, they come upon an abandoned ancient city. Their explorations underground causes something to stir from its slumber.

                          del Toro has been trying to develop the work for years and will now retool the script with co-writer Matthew Robbins. del Toro, Susan Montford and Don Murphy will produce. Pre-production will kick off shortly with filming to begin next Summer.
                          The muffled drums sad roll has beat the soldier's last tatoo. No more on life's parade shall meet that brave and fallen few.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Don't get me wrong, there have been other good books, but nothing beats Lovecraft. He recognized far more than most that once seen a thing isn't scary anymore. It's the unknown and the in-understandable that truly creates horror.
                            “To discriminate against a thoroughly upright citizen because he belongs to some particular church, or because, like Abraham Lincoln, he has not avowed his allegiance to any church, is an outrage against that liberty of conscience which is one of the foundations of American life.”

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                            • #15
                              Lovecraft is the master by which all others in the 20th ce were ever and can be measured.

                              After him only MR James and King.

                              Before him?

                              Stevenson
                              Poe
                              Shelley
                              Stoker
                              Wilde
                              Who ever wrote Sweeney Todd

                              With the exception of Poe the others were one shot wonders essentially in the genre. Great but not like Poe.

                              And before them; masters and creators of gothics were: Walpole, William Beckford, Ann Radcliffe and Matthew Lewis.

                              Whose the greatest?

                              Poe set the standard for HP.
                              Last edited by Thunder Dome; 30 Jul 10, 00:37.

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