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Would You Live in a Cave?

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  • Would You Live in a Cave?

    Dugout Dick Dies at age 94.

    http://www.honoraryunsubscribe.com/r...zimmerman.html

    I'm sure Emerson would have approved but did this guy take things a bit too far?
    Any metaphor will tear if stretched over too much reality.

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  • #2
    Sure...why not? Houses are just formalized above-ground caves anyway.

    My personal choice would be a an underground house set into a hillside, or an abandoned gold mine deep underground.
    Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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    • #3
      Reading this reminds me of a old neighbour, Roy was his name, this is going back a few years ago when I was still living on my parent's farm, he lived in a house but it never had any electricity, no phone, and he always fed his cattle with a horse and sled. He never owned a car so his brother would pick him up and take him into town once a week. He use to walk in all types of weather with just a sleeveless shirt and pants, sometimes a hessian bag as a coat! I still remember the day I was riding on my motorbike in the middle of a cold winter wrapped up in a thick coat, gloves and hat.... and along comes old Roy walking in our paddocks in pants and shirt. He lived a good age, and was always happy to chat to you.
      "In modern war... you will die like a dog for no good reason."
      Ernest Hemingway.

      "The more I learn about people, The more I love my dog".
      Mark Twain.

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      • #4
        Sure...why not? Houses are just formalized above-ground caves anyway.
        ande the cave does not come withe bills ande morgetages ande water rates,why not live in a cave!

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        • #5
          ...:be it ever so humble.."

          Wasn't Howard Hughes a recluse as well? As for living in a cave, it's probably done more than most people think. A buddy of mine has a girlfriend that lives in a modified cave here in NH. If you can remember wa-a-a-a-y back in the 1980s, there was a "back to the land" movement that made use of solar, geo, and wind energy (IMO they should've kept it up) and there was this new technology called 'earth houses'. Basically it was a house dug into the south side of a hill so that the uppermost floor was below the crest of the hill. Vast glass areas (facing south) were used for passive solar heating and light and the rest of the living space was protected from the weather by being 'underground'. An interesting concept. I've read of some dwellings in the Australian outback being dug into the earth for the reason of keeping cool as well.


          Last edited by Jose50; 01 May 10, 10:07. Reason: cannt spel fer shirt..
          ARRRR! International Talk Like A Pirate Day - September 19th
          IN MARE IN COELO

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          • #6
            I certainly would. One of the plumbing companies I worked for had the plumbing shop part built as a basement in a hillside the offices were upstairs. Even with 5 roll up garage type doors on the exposed wall of the shop it stayed nice in there year round.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by GCoyote View Post
              Dugout Dick Dies at age 94.

              http://www.honoraryunsubscribe.com/r...zimmerman.html

              I'm sure Emerson would have approved but did this guy take things a bit too far?
              well there are cave houses out near cooper pedies i believe and i think there is a also a hotel of caves so obviously some people do prefure it


              well i guess i've lived a to comfertibale life so i would say no but if u can fend for yah self anyone could
              http://g.bf3stats.com/pc/1LP76r6C/melba_101.png

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              • #8
                http://www.turkeytravelplanner.com/g...ve_hotels.html

                Lots of folks live like that in Cappadocia in Turkey, saw it and some underground cities for myself a few years back amazing stuff.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by jose50 View Post
                  Wasn't Howard Hughes a recluse as well? As for living in a cave, it's probably done more than most people think. A buddy of mine has a girlfriend that lives in a modified cave here in NH. If you can remember wa-a-a-a-y back in the 1980s, there was a "back to the land" movement that made use of solar, geo, and wind energy (IMO they should've kept it up) and there was this new technology called 'earth houses'. Basically it was a house dug into the south side of a hill so that the uppermost floor was below the crest of the hill. Vast glass areas (facing south) were used for passive solar heating and light and the rest of the living space was protected from the weather by being 'underground'. An interesting concept. I've read of some dwellings in the Australian outback being dug into the earth for the reason of keeping cool as well.


                  New technology? Sod houses have been around in the American west since the fronteir days.

                  One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions - Admiral Grace Hopper

                  "The eunuch should not take pride in his chastity."
                  Wu Cheng'en Monkey

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                  • #10
                    I'd want some large windows and/or vent in light but caves have a lot going for them, especially since they usually don't need a lot of heat and no air conditioning.
                    "If you are right, then you are right even if everyone says you are wrong. If you are wrong then you are wrong even if everyone says you are right." William Penn.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by trailboss49 View Post
                      I'd want some large windows and/or vent in light but caves have a lot going for them, especially since they usually don't need a lot of heat and no air conditioning.
                      and probally wouldn't cost u anything to move in lol

                      but imagine trying curry a fridge into a cave
                      http://g.bf3stats.com/pc/1LP76r6C/melba_101.png

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                      • #12
                        Not a nasty, deep, dark cave, but a Hobbit hole...and that means comfort.
                        TTFN

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Kendoka Girl View Post
                          Not a nasty, deep, dark cave, but a Hobbit hole...and that means comfort.
                          And multiple concussions from the 4 foot ceilings
                          One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions - Admiral Grace Hopper

                          "The eunuch should not take pride in his chastity."
                          Wu Cheng'en Monkey

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                          • #14
                            Lost my original response due to a Google freezeup of my browser.

                            Could not find a proper link to underground house construction but did find that the Progressive Democrats have hijacked Google with a link to their propaganda site known as the Democratic Underground.

                            Back on topic.

                            Locally, I had a chance to visit a arch buried home. Original construction of the two story house called for a wood arch form so that the concrete arch could be constructed and buried in soil. Thanks to the newly available pressure treated lumber, it turned out to be cheaper to just construct the arch from the treated wood and waterproof it.

                            The home, with its full height low E triple pane south facing picture windows requires no air conditioning and very little heating. It looked very nice inside with the high arch ceiling and large kitchen and bedrooms towards the back. It has returned its investment in energy savings with comfort.

                            On old construction, the 120 year old Temple Theater is air conditioned with its original geothermal cooling system. This circulates cold water from two wells through radiators that also serve to heat the building. The system has worked well for all of its existence.

                            On the White Elephant side was the rathole designed during the Carter years known as the Saginaw Federal Building. It was a structure buried in the clay floodplain of Downtown Saginaw that featured a vacuum tube solar collector, garden park on the roof, and compost toilets.

                            The building was a disaster from the start. The solar collector never work as designed and wa finally abandoned after a hailstorm destroyed the glass tubing. The roof leaked constantly. There were problems with water seeping into the floor. I won't mention about the problems of the compost toilet in an enclosed space. The building had to be abandoned when toxic mold started growing on the walls making employees sick. It was finally demolished and replaced with a conventional above ground structure.

                            Only time will tell if the Geothermal heating and cooling being installed with a 30% energy credit prove to save 50% energy use as advertised. Likewise, will be the solar cell shingles being installed to select customers of DTE at a 80% installation rebate.

                            http://findportablesolarpower.com/sa...olar-currents/

                            http://www.dteenergy.com/pdfs/solarP...ogram10_09.pdf
                            Last edited by SRV Ron; 03 May 10, 08:15.
                            “Breaking News,”

                            “Something irrelevant in your life just happened and now we are going to blow it all out of proportion for days to keep you distracted from what's really going on.”

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                            • #15
                              Yes, there is a military installation located a bit from my home on a mountain. A couple of hundred years ago it used to be a sacred place for the Sami, but as usually dealing with the Swedish government it didn´t stay so. Nice place, great view if they keep downgrading the at same speed I might even get it. Naturally I can´t provide any more details or pictures of the place...
                              “For there is nothing more serious than a lunatic when he comes to the central point of his lunacy.”

                              Max Sterner

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