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Remember when you thought your dad was invincible?

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  • Remember when you thought your dad was invincible?

    It's a sad day when you realize he isn't.
    "The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." Bertrand Russell

  • #2
    Originally posted by Leftie View Post
    It's a sad day when you realize he isn't.
    It depends on how you interpret invincible, my Dad was human but as far as caring for him, he was always Invincible!
    'By Horse by Tram'.


    I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
    " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

    Comment


    • #3
      There might come a day when you can kick yur dads arse...

      But there'll never come a day when ya beat him!


      On the Plains of Hesitation lie the blackened bones of countless millions who, at the dawn of victory, sat down to rest-and resting... died. Adlai E. Stevenson

      ACG History Today

      BoRG

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      • #4
        My dad would never admit it.
        "In modern war... you will die like a dog for no good reason."
        Ernest Hemingway.

        "The more I learn about people, The more I love my dog".
        Mark Twain.

        Comment


        • #5
          My father used to be a marathon runner and avid swimmer well into his 60s. He was diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease in 2003. In the early days he would come here and we would walk his favourite trails and go to the pool. When he could no longer drive I would go to his home and take him for walks. Three years ago as we started out he said, "I can't do this anymore." and that was our last walk. When he was put in care in 2008 I would take him out in a wheelchair for walks. We would sit in the back corner of a fish and chips shop where he could throw food or become challenging without bothering other people too much. About six months ago it became impossible even to take him from the hospital. He became too agitated or violent at times to visit. His last words to me were "Kill me you f***er!" In Dec 2009 I went for my usual visit. I ended up sitting with him for three days while he died. It is difficult.

          It's good to remember that someone's final days don't negate the rest of their life, attatchments, and acomplishments. The death of a loved one is difficult but it becomes an important part of us. We need to contribute now and build something together. We may not be rich or important but maybe when we pass someone will say, "I remember that guy. He did good."

          1983


          1996


          2003


          2007
          Last edited by Duncan; 21 Apr 10, 23:53.

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          • #6
            My dad had flaws, but one thing he had, was hard core work ethic.

            Started when he was 16, worked all his life, missed 3 lousy days. What an impossible feat to beat these days.

            He was also married for 50+ years, another hard to beat accomplishment.

            He was an accomplished modeler, and a very good photographer.

            He was never a very physical man, but hey, I'd be happy to just equal his accomplishments any day.
            Life is change. Built models for decades.
            Not sure anyone here actually knows the real me.
            I didn't for a long time either.

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            • #7
              My dad was a tyrant but when I grew up and became independent I realized he was a cowardly little man.

              Beware of every word you say to your kids because words are important and ultimately you will be held accountable for your words and actions.
              Last edited by MonsterZero; 22 Apr 10, 01:10.

              "Artillery adds dignity to what would otherwise be a ugly brawl."
              --Frederick II, King of Prussia

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              • #8
                My dad was a tyrant
                youre dad was the devil or something?
                but when I grew up and became independent I realized he was a cowardly little man.
                why was he a coward?

                Remember when you thought your dad was invincible?
                No but i use to thinke my father was a coole dude not nowe though,I get embrassest in public when i am with him cause i thinke he is more nerdy nowe.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Heidi View Post
                  youre dad was the devil or something?
                  why was he a coward?

                  No but i use to thinke my father was a coole dude not nowe though,I get embrassest in public when i am with him cause i thinke he is more nerdy nowe.
                  Heidi, you are not me so you are wasting your time.

                  "Artillery adds dignity to what would otherwise be a ugly brawl."
                  --Frederick II, King of Prussia

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I was very fortunate, I had the man I admired the most as my father.

                    It was up into his 50s before I realized he wasn't invicible. I was touting a steel fireplace up the steps & he couldn't help me.

                    I was honored by being his primary care giver the last 2 weeks of his life when he could no longer care for himself.

                    He died at home with his wife & 2 of his sons with him like he wanted.
                    "If you are right, then you are right even if everyone says you are wrong. If you are wrong then you are wrong even if everyone says you are right." William Penn.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Admiral View Post
                      There might come a day when you can kick yur dads arse...

                      But there'll never come a day when ya beat him!


                      Well said.I remember the day my Dad learned that wall to wall counseling wouldn't work on me anymore.My Dad also had a very strong work ethic,and he just never got sick!Until the end of course.He had a couple of heart attacks,clogged arteries,and then his kidneys failed.He lost the will to live after 9/11.He was a Cold War warrior,and watching 9/11 unfold hit him especially hard.But he was still invincible to me.Until July 9th,2002.I was summoned to the hospital just in time to watch the EKG flatline.
                      ALL LIVES SPLATTER!

                      BLACK JEEPS MATTER!

                      BLACK MOTORCYCLES MATTER!

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                      • #12
                        Some very moving emotional posts here and I take my cap off to all of you that felt so close to your fathers.

                        i was a late mistake to my parents, so pretty much grew up without their input - by that stage they were too busy with careers and themselves to give too much time to me, I spose. Anyway, my old man was and still is a stubborn old SoB who criticises anything he cannot or does not want to understand and dislikes most everything that he did not make, invent, give an idea to, looks different etc etc. I visit him about once a year, and then only for about a day or two, cos else we just end up arguing about absolutely everything under the sun. He is still fit and healthy pushing eighty - doing weights each day, exercise and walks - thank God, but I never had that sort of relationship with him that I thought him invincible - I was out the house the earliest that I legally could and paid for everything I had when I stayed there.

                        On the plus side, it has made me a better father to my kids and I support them far more than i had, which I hope will make my two sons and daughter feel the same way about me, but I see more of him each day in me which is rather sad and strange at the same time.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Duncan View Post
                          My father used to be a marathon runner and avid swimmer well into his 60s. He was diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease in 2003. In the early days he would come here and we would walk his favourite trails and go to the pool. When he could no longer drive I would go to his home and take him for walks. Three years ago as we started out he said, "I can't do this anymore." and that was our last walk. When he was put in care in 2008 I would take him out in a wheelchair for walks. We would sit in the back corner of a fish and chips shop where he could throw food or become challenging without bothering other people too much. About six months ago it became impossible even to take him from the hospital. He became too agitated or violent at times to visit. His last words to me were "Kill me you f***er!" In Dec 2009 I went for my usual visit. I ended up sitting with him for three days while he died. It is difficult.

                          It's good to remember that someone's final days don't negate the rest of their life, attatchments, and acomplishments. The death of a loved one is difficult but it becomes an important part of us. We need to contribute now and build something together. We may not be rich or important but maybe when we pass someone will say, "I remember that guy. He did good."

                          1983


                          1996


                          2003


                          2007
                          I'm afraid I have just read your mail with tears in my eyes, my wife died that way, last year in a nursing home, Thank God we were all there with her.
                          'By Horse by Tram'.


                          I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
                          " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            My dad and I are really close, but I know he is not invincible. Because whenever we are chopping firewood and I split a piece, well it goes flying and whacks pa on the knee or below it. But to everything else he is almost like rock.
                            In this world nothing is certain but death and taxes
                            - Benjamin Franklin, U.S. statesman, author, and scientist

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Growing up, my dad WAS invincible. He was one of the veterans of 1st Marines on Guadalcanal. As he grew older and the diabetes took his legs, his eyes and finally his speech, he was still invincible as he never gave up. He's been gone for 25 years but I still feel his presence.
                              ARRRR! International Talk Like A Pirate Day - September 19th
                              IN MARE IN COELO

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