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What is a CWT Truck

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  • What is a CWT Truck

    Hello I was looking at some british TO&E and came across something called a 15 cwt truck and I was trying to find out what a cwt truck was and what cwt stood for.

  • #2
    Just Googling UK Military 15 CWT truck I find this in Wikki:

    I
    n 1935, Bedford began the development of a 15 cwt truck for the British War Office. This entered service as the MW in 1939, and 65,995 examples had been built by the end of World War II in 1945. The MW appeared in a bewildering range of roles, as a water tanker, general duties truck, personnel carrier, petrol tanker, wireless truck and Anti-Aircraft gun tractor - among others.
    I would guess that it's either the classification, something with Weight\tons of the load or the vehicle itself.

    I know in the US Military vehicles were often called by a weight classification, i.e. a 2.5 ton Truck, "Duce and a half". Our standard squad carrier in the Engineer's was a 'Five Ton' truck....
    “The time has come,” the Walrus said,
    “To talk of many things:
    Of shoes—and ships—and sealing-wax—
    Of cabbages—and kings—
    And why the sea is boiling hot—
    And whether pigs have wings.”
    ― Lewis Carroll

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    • #3
      This could be your answer:

      http://www.vickersmachinegun.org.uk/transport-15cwt.htm

      The use of the 15-CWT truck stemmed from the increased mobilisation of the army in the 1930s. The bulk of the subject material in this page comes from the 1939 version of the Small Arms Training Vol. I, Pamphlet No. 7. The .303-inch Machine Gun. Part II - Training. It may be worth pointing out that by the 1941 publication of the same manual, the detail on the 15-cwt truck had been replaced by the Universal Carrier (dealt with on a separate page of the site)
      “The time has come,” the Walrus said,
      “To talk of many things:
      Of shoes—and ships—and sealing-wax—
      Of cabbages—and kings—
      And why the sea is boiling hot—
      And whether pigs have wings.”
      ― Lewis Carroll

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      • #4
        15 CWT was the load capacity. Its like calling a truck a "2 ton". It was produced by Morris, and looks like this:


        It was one of the more common (If not the most common) British trucks of WWII.
        Winnie says
        ---------------------------------
        "He fell out of a Gestapo car, over a bridge, and onto a railway line. Then was run over by the Berlin Express.

        It was an Accident."
        Herr Flick.

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        • #5
          I did a quick search last night and didn't find anything.But common sense tells me it means "carrying weight tons" or something similar.
          ALL LIVES SPLATTER!

          BLACK JEEPS MATTER!

          BLACK MOTORCYCLES MATTER!

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          • #6
            cwt means hundredweight c from latin...century. 1 cwt = 112 pounds ... see wikikpedia for further details, therefore 15cwt carries 1680 pounds

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            • #7
              Originally posted by pball View Post
              cwt means hundredweight c from latin...century. 1 cwt = 112 pounds ... see wikikpedia for further details, therefore 15cwt carries 1680 pounds
              Thank you!
              ALL LIVES SPLATTER!

              BLACK JEEPS MATTER!

              BLACK MOTORCYCLES MATTER!

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              • #8
                I've heard it termed counterweight. Doesn't appear to be correct though.
                Life is change. Built models for decades.
                Not sure anyone here actually knows the real me.
                I didn't for a long time either.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by les Brains View Post
                  I've heard it termed counterweight. Doesn't appear to be correct though.
                  No mate, definately Hundredwright, very useful little truck the old 15!!
                  'By Horse by Tram'.


                  I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
                  " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

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