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Saudi's finally kicking some butt!

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  • Saudi's finally kicking some butt!

    Death was too good for these b*****ds!


    excerpt from article:

    4 Killed After Hostage's Death Are Called Saudi Cell's Leaders
    By NEIL MacFARQUHAR

    Published: June 20, 2004


    AIRO, June 19 — Saudi officials said Saturday that four men killed in a shootout in downtown Riyadh on Friday were top leaders of the vicious cell of Al Qaeda that beheaded an American hostage hours earlier and that is responsible for most of the often lethal attacks on Westerners in the kingdom.

    But Saudi experts on militant groups were divided on whether the blow to the cell would cripple its abilities to carry out further attacks, or merely disrupt any short-term plans.

    On Saturday, official Saudi television displayed the blood-spattered bodies of the four, evidently to quash an announcement on an Islamist Web site that the death of the one of the men, the chief of a cell responsible for months of increasingly gory attacks on foreigners, was a lie.

    Saudi experts were convinced that any attacks planned by the group plans in the short term would be disrupted, but they noted Al Qaeda's lizardlike ability to regenerate itself in the longer run.

    The announcement from the Saudi Interior Ministry about the death of what it called members of a "deviant group" made clear the crucial roles that the men had played in Al Qaeda on the Arabian Peninsula. The group is believed to be a semiofficial Qaeda franchise inspired by the goal of clearing all expatriates from the kingdom to pave the way for a pure Caliphate. Whether Al Qaeda itself operates in the kingdom remains a murky question. There are certainly Saudis with ties to Osama bin Laden there, but a direct link between him and the recent spate of attacks has not been established.

    The ministry statement identified the most important of the four as Abdelaziz al-Muqrin, the leader of Al Qaeda on the Arabian Peninsula and a veteran of numerous jihadi wars in Afghanistan, Bosnia-Herzegovina and Chechnya.

    His flamboyant statements claiming responsibility for a string of recent attacks often emphasized the goriest of their details, including the beheading of Mr. Johnson and the dragging of the body of an American through the streets in the oil center of Khobar. A statement about Mr. Johnson and a colleague who was killed the day that Mr. Johnson was abducted said they were singled out because they worked on Apache helicopters, vilified in the Arab world because they are used by Israelis against Palestinians and by American forces against Iraqis.

    Another of the four militants was identified as Mr. Muqrin's top deputy, Faisal Abdul Rahman al-Dakheel. He was on the list of Saudi Arabia's 26 most wanted terrorists and appeared on a videotape released last weekend that showed another attack on an American, in which Robert Jacobs, who worked for the Vinnell Corporation, was gunned down in his Riyadh garage.

    A third was identified as Turki al-Mutairi, one of three gunmen who escaped May 30 after a shooting rampage in Khobar that left 22 people dead, 19 of them foreigners.

    The Saudi statement said the fourth was Ibrahim Abdullah al-Draihem, who among other crimes had helped plan the bombing of a residential compound in Riyadh last November in which 17 people died.

    The Interior Ministry said 12 men were arrested in two hide-outs; Reuters quoted an unidentified security official as saying that one was linked to the bombing of the Cole, an American destroyer in Yemen, in 2000.

    Experts on the militant groups were stunned that so many senior members of the cell were moving around together at the same time. They said it appeared to be a sign that the group was smaller than previously believed.

    "They were so unprofessional to have their main leaders in one place at the same time and they were all killed in one operation," Abdel Rahman Lahem, a lawyer and expert on militant groups.

    That deflates the terrifying image of the organization that had been built up in recent weeks, he said, noting that not only the leader of the cell but also his prospective successors had died. Mr. Lahem said he expected that the remaining members were "quite shocked, devastated because all their key leaders were killed in one night."
    All your ACG posts are belong to us!

  • #2
    I caught this on Fox News, Rita Cosby reported that the al Qaeda in Saudi Arabia claims that Saudi security forces assisted them in the abduction of Johnson. The group is claiming that Qaeda sympathizers in the police force lent them official vehicles and uniforms they used in fooling Johnson to stop at a roadblock.
    I hate it when I see one of those road signs that says "Draw Bridge Ahead" and I don't have a pencil.
    -Lou Chiafullo

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Geeky Nerd
      I caught this on Fox News, Rita Cosby reported that the al Qaeda in Saudi Arabia claims that Saudi security forces assisted them in the abduction of Johnson. The group is claiming that Qaeda sympathizers in the police force lent them official vehicles and uniforms they used in fooling Johnson to stop at a roadblock.
      I saw the same story on AP. I'm not sure what bothers me more -- security forces loaning uniforms to AQ, or AQ holding a press conference like a legitimate organization. I'm also shocked that they are briefing their techniques and that people are accepting it at face value. I think the whole shootin' match needs to be verified by someone knowledgable.

      JS
      Barcsi János ispán vezérőrnagy
      Time Magazine's Person of the Year for 2003 & 2006


      "Never pet a burning dog."

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      • #4
        Who can we trust in that part of the world now? There are so much news story coming out of Saudi Arabia, that is true one minute and 10 minutes later it is rebutted.
        And Jeff has a point: AQ and press conferences shouldn't even be permitted.
        http://canadiangenealogyandresearch.ca

        Soviet and Canadian medal collector!

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        • #5
          A local papers this morning carried similar articles.

          What gets me is, if they could find the perpetrators four hours after the fact, a very short time frame, I think they probably could have gotten them four hours before the fact.

          Convenient that AQ gets what they want done, and the Saudi security forces "silence" those who might be able to point fingers. AQ gets its martyrs, and Saudi Arabia saves face with the US. And we still lose someone to barbarity.
          Retreat hell, we just got here. Every Marine, a rifleman.

          Never let the facts get in the way of the truth.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Iron Mike USMC
            A local papers this morning carried similar articles.

            What gets me is, if they could find the perpetrators four hours after the fact, a very short time frame, I think they probably could have gotten them four hours before the fact.

            Convenient that AQ gets what they want done, and the Saudi security forces "silence" those who might be able to point fingers. AQ gets its martyrs, and Saudi Arabia saves face with the US. And we still lose someone to barbarity.
            wow! shocking news development. I will hold judgement until I see it in some more legit papers than FOX!

            IIRC, a few years ago didn't the Saudis refuse the U.S. intel to interview some terrorists before excecuting them? (was it something with the bombing of the USS Cole?)

            If I may be so bold as to quote Shakespeare, "There is something fishy in Saudi Arabia."
            All your ACG posts are belong to us!

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            • #7
              If I am correct, the USS Cole incident happened in Yemen, not Saudi Arabia.
              I hate it when I see one of those road signs that says "Draw Bridge Ahead" and I don't have a pencil.
              -Lou Chiafullo

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              • #8
                Excuse me but my dirty, nasty, and suspicious mind (or what I have not embalmed alredy) has to wonder....

                a. were these really the AQ leaders?

                b. if so how did they find them?

                c. if not who are these poor schmucks?

                d. if so does the rapid attempt to capture and subsequent execution/killing indicate that a 'agreement' was violated...

                Since Wahhidism is so rampart in Saudi, I would be shocked and awed if their LEA's and Intell aparatus were NOT penetrated by Islamic radicals or fellow travellers....

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Geeky Nerd
                  If I am correct, the USS Cole incident happened in Yemen, not Saudi Arabia.
                  right!

                  it was in Riyadh in 1995...
                  "In 1995 a bomb went off outside a military facility in Riyadh killing five American servicemen. The Saudis accused of the attack confessed that they were influenced by bin Laden?s ideas and had trained in Afghanistan, yet American investigators were never able to question the suspects before they were summarily executed."
                  All your ACG posts are belong to us!

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