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HMS Terror Found

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  • Mountain Man
    replied
    Originally posted by The Exorcist View Post
    He over-reached and I was here to see it.

    My day is complete!
    Ah...how little it takes to make us happy these days.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Exorcist
    replied
    He over-reached and I was here to see it.

    My day is complete!

    Leave a comment:


  • MarkV
    replied
    Originally posted by Marmat View Post

    You've got it backwards. Ross Island, is named after Arctic and Antarctic explorer Sir James Ross (who would later search for Franklin as well), the volcanoes were named after the ships serving his 1839-1843 expedition of Antarctic mapping and discovery; HMS Erebus, launched in 1826 & HMS Terror, launched in 1813, both later used by Franklin. Both names have been used many times over the history of the RN.
    Touche

    I will don my metaphorical crutches and hobble round and dong my source(s) with lump of ice covered lava. However the RN joke still stands and appears in newspapers of the period.

    Leave a comment:


  • Marmat
    replied
    Originally posted by MarkV View Post

    The two ships were named after two large active volcanoes on Ross Island in the Antarctic. It was a jokey reference to the smoke that the not very efficient steam engines belched. They were bringing two South Polar smoke emitters to North Polar regions. I'm afraid that's typical of British Naval humour in the first part of the 19th century. It was even worse earlier Nelson liked bad puns!
    You've got it backwards. Ross Island, is named after Arctic and Antarctic explorer Sir James Ross (who would later search for Franklin as well), the volcanoes were named after the ships serving his 1839-1843 expedition of Antarctic mapping and discovery; HMS Erebus, launched in 1826 & HMS Terror, launched in 1813, both later used by Franklin. Both names have been used many times over the history of the RN.
    Last edited by Marmat; 05 Nov 18, 09:15.

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  • MarkV
    replied
    Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post

    They should have done a better job of studying the Romans, who suffered widely from lead poisoning.

    They also had steam power at their command.
    The toxicity of lead was not well understood at the time

    The Romans' problem was that they had a sweet tooth but the only natural sweeter they had access to in any quantity was honey. Roman bee-keeping used fixed combs which meant that the colony had to be destroyed when the honey was harvested. This meant low productivity and an expensive product so that honey based sweets and dishes were the preserve of the well off. The less well off could produce sweetened dishes by cooking in lead vessels. Lead poisoning is cumulative and given that getting past 50 was rare in the Roman world many died of something else before their lead poisoning became apparent. Those who did make their three score and ten were usually from the better off who could afford honeyed dishes . The connection was therefore never made. Modern analytical tools applied to excavated Roman era skeletons show lead contents in many far higher than in modern humans. There is another element of bias in this evidence as burial rather than a form of cremation was higher amongst the less well off so that their bones are the more likely to be excavated.

    Any citizen of Europe or North America over 40 is likely to have some lead in them given the extensive use of lead in plumbing in older buildings plus leaded petrol and lead in paints and other products. Some doubt has been cast however as to whether the lead solder in the tins is the prime culprit in the case of the crews of Erebus and Terror. Yes it would leach into the food which would mean that they had some lead in their systems but whether it would build up to disabling levels so quickly is now questioned. It has been suggested that the tins were the problem but because the canning process destroyed some vital vitamins. Men living exclusively on tinned food would succumb and it seems the cold conditions would exacerbate the effect. It has been postulated that the same issue may have contributed to the loss of Captain Scott and his men.

    BTW when did the Romans have steam power? The Alexandrian Greeks had a form of steam powered toy but it could do no useful work but the Romans ?
    Last edited by MarkV; 05 Nov 18, 06:14.

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  • MarkV
    replied
    Originally posted by The Exorcist View Post
    The Brits had way too many ships, the names they came up with....


    e.
    The two ships were named after two large active volcanoes on Ross Island in the Antarctic. It was a jokey reference to the smoke that the not very efficient steam engines belched. They were bringing two South Polar smoke emitters to North Polar regions. I'm afraid that's typical of British Naval humour in the first part of the 19th century. It was even worse earlier - Nelson liked bad puns!
    Last edited by MarkV; 05 Nov 18, 08:23.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mountain Man
    replied
    Originally posted by The Exorcist View Post
    The Brits had way too many ships, the names they came up with....


    That expedition should be much more widely known, it is a testament to the courage and the price paid by the great explorers, and this was close to the end of the age of terrestrial exploration.
    They were relying on some new high-tech stuff to get them through, and were betrayed by it. Canned food that could last years and years, and salt-water desalinization plants.... in 1840!

    The problem was just one item; lead.
    The tins were sealed with it, and the pipes were made of it.
    IMHO, they never had a chance.
    They should have done a better job of studying the Romans, who suffered widely from lead poisoning.

    They also had steam power at their command.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Exorcist
    replied
    The Brits had way too many ships, the names they came up with....


    That expedition should be much more widely known, it is a testament to the courage and the price paid by the great explorers, and this was close to the end of the age of terrestrial exploration.
    They were relying on some new high-tech stuff to get them through, and were betrayed by it. Canned food that could last years and years, and salt-water desalinization plants.... in 1840!

    The problem was just one item; lead.
    The tins were sealed with it, and the pipes were made of it.
    IMHO, they never had a chance.

    Leave a comment:


  • MarkV
    replied
    Wrecks can survive a long time given the right conditions. The oldest known 'intact' wreck is nearly two and a half thousand years old and over a mile down in the Black Sea. It is cold down there , the water contains no dissolved oxygen at all and there is no light or other source of energy. It is impossible for even extremophile life forms to exist there. Metals cannot oxidise (rust) so there is nothing to attack the wreck which may, if not disturbed, last as long again. Such conditions do not exist in many places (there is even some life in the deepest oceanic abysses). Looking at the photos of HMS Terror it looks as if she is in not such favourable conditions for preservation - close but not complete.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-45951132

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  • Mountain Man
    replied
    Hijacked thread by the usual people unable to stay focused for more than one minute at a time. Start your own thread if you can't handle the real ones.

    Leave a comment:


  • Marmat
    replied
    Originally posted by slick_miester View Post

    Gloves and skates are good enough, but their sticks are sh*t. The explode on contact.

    Tomorrow I'll post pics in the hockey thread of Jr beating some Army a$$ up in West Point if you're interested.
    Sure, but doesn't the Corps of Cadets take a dim view of kids from NYC going up-state to lay a beating on some of their own?

    Leave a comment:


  • slick_miester
    replied
    Originally posted by Marmat View Post

    Huh, I don't get it? Back when I was a young snot, we went to Canadian Tire to buy Supercycle bikes in the spring, and CCM skates in the fall, Tacks if we were lucky enough; dunno what CCM is like now.
    Gloves and skates are good enough, but their sticks are sh*t. The explode on contact.

    Tomorrow I'll post pics in the hockey thread of Jr beating some Army a$$ up in West Point if you're interested.

    Leave a comment:


  • Marmat
    replied
    Originally posted by slick_miester View Post

    So we can safely conclude that it was not manufactured by CCM.

    Huh, I don't get it? Back when I was a young snot, we went to Canadian Tire to buy Supercycle bikes in the spring, and CCM skates in the fall, Tacks if we were lucky enough (I never was); dunno what CCM is like now, I preferred Sherwood sticks anyway.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mountain Man
    replied
    Originally posted by slick_miester View Post
    Pristine, eh? What's the Kelly Blue Book value?

    Rimshot
    Priceless...

    Leave a comment:


  • slick_miester
    replied
    Originally posted by Marmat View Post
    . . . . When you consider that the Arctic Research Foundation expected to find a ship that had been crushed by ice, "pristine" is not a huge exaggeration. . . . .
    So we can safely conclude that it was not manufactured by CCM.

    Leave a comment:

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