Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

World's Greatest General - Part I : American Civil War

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • World's Greatest General - Part I : American Civil War

    In our original effort to find the world's greatest general, there were several comments on the poll that certain leaders have been ommitted, some that made the list shouldn't have, and so on.

    In an effort to provide a more complete picture, we've decided to host a series of polls to determine who our top ten finalists will be, selected from various eras, regions, and wars. (Please visit the old 'Best General' poll to help us decide on which 10 categories to poll from!)

    For our first poll, we'll start with the American Civil War! Vote, and tell us why you chose as you did!
    0
    U. S. Grant
    0%
    0
    W. T. Sherman
    0%
    0
    George Thomas
    0%
    0
    Phillip Sheridan
    0%
    0
    Robert E. Lee
    0%
    0
    Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson
    0%
    0
    James Longstreet
    0%
    0
    J.E.B Stuart
    0%
    0
    N.B. Forrest
    0%
    0
    Patrick Cleburne
    0%
    0
    "When I am abroad I always make it a rule never to criticize or attack the Government of my country. I make up for lost time when I am at home."

    Winston Churchill

  • #2
    I've allowed multiple votes, but please don't vote for more than 3 in any given poll.
    "When I am abroad I always make it a rule never to criticize or attack the Government of my country. I make up for lost time when I am at home."

    Winston Churchill

    Comment


    • #3
      Jackson and Forrest because they both emphasized rapid movement and the element of surprize that later became the doctines of mechanized warfare that dominated the letter half of the 20th century. They were both so far ahead of their time tactically they the were seen as "odd" to their contemporaries.
      Lance W.

      Peace through superior firepower.

      Comment


      • #4
        Jackson was lucky he faced some of the worst Generals the Union fielded in the East. Don't think he could have gotten away with some of his maneuvers against the likes of Grant, Sherman, or Sheridan. Also, his performance during the Seven Days was abysmal. Forrest is an over glorified raider in my opinion. Sure he caused the Union headaches in their early campaigns during the war but in the end he did nothing to change the course of the war. I voted for Grant as he had the strategic vision to see what it took to defeat the South.
        Texas, where we have the death penalty and aren't afraid to use it!

        Comment


        • #5
          I voted Grant. Why? simple, he won the war for the Union.

          Comment


          • #6
            ACW Shining Stars

            What about Major General John Reynolds? He commanded I Corps with the famous Iron Brigade at it's lead. He was one of the shining star commanders of the early civil war. He was tapped for command of the Army of the Potomac just prior to Gettysburg but turned it down, preferring field command. This proved to be his downfall. He was cut down by a Confederate sharpshooter while he led his men against Heth's division on July 1st 1863. ALthough the Union army was a defeated army at this time, all units under his command, from division to corps level preformed admirably and had the respect of their adversaries. Not that you guys didn't know that.

            I just thought that he would have deserved mention. Especially if Cleburn was nominated. As well as the infamous founder of the KKK, Nathan Bedford Forrest.

            Comment


            • #7
              Greatest ACW General

              Jackson had many of the attributes of a superior leader, tactician and fighter. 1) He was able to see the battlefied in three dimensions; 2) His thinking was at once very focused and abstract. He was able to both look at the given situation critically and abstractly, considering multiple courses of action, and promptly choosing the course of actionhe believed to be appropriate to the situation; 3) Far from being simply "adventurous" (as one may so consider a leader such as Custer), Jackson tried the unusual, the unorthodox or the revolutionary, not because some adventuresome or avant-garde predisposition, but because he believed that such a tactic would catch his oppoenent off guard, unprepared. His actions proved this to be true on many occasions. 4) Despite reservations that his superiors had regarding his plans and actions, they came to trust him implicitly, an uncommon vote of confidence in a military arena where uncertainty, confusion and doubt where everyday companions.

              To sum up, Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson did what seemed to many others the improbable, the impossible, the foolhardy and the inexplicable. It is no wonder that, on hearing of Jackson's untimely death, Robert E. Lee proclaomed "I have lost my right hand." Debates could rage for hours of how the war may have played out had not Jackson been killed when he was.
              Mens Est Clavis Victoriae
              (The Mind Is The Key To Victory)

              Comment


              • #8
                "The best defense is an offense"

                Jackson

                Comment


                • #9
                  jackson #1

                  Jackson was the best, because unlike sherman or sheriden the two best union maneuver generals he usually engaged superior forces, at least in a numerical sense.
                  grant was the most practical and pragmatic of the generals, he new his strengths and weaknesses as well as the enemies and capitilised on it.
                  lee was a great leader and engineer, but out of his depth as an offensive general, thats where jackson came in. If jackson had lived the south would still have lost, if littl mac had still lost the election. but i believe the csa would have won gettysburg and some further battles.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    If Jackson lives then more then likely Gettysburg doesn't happen, or at least on the scale that it did, and instead the big battle takes place at Meade's Pipe Creek line. Or Jackson controls his division commanders better and they realize it is Union cavalry in Gettysburg and follow orders and don't attack.
                    Texas, where we have the death penalty and aren't afraid to use it!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Good point, sorry i do this of the top of my head, i don't have any reference material available. But I think you got my point.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I agree with Ranger Boo Boo...

                        about Grant, and for the same reasons. Also, Grant got three enemy forces to surrender to his forces, including R E Lee's vaunted ANV.
                        I come here to discuss a piece of business with you and what are you gonna do? You're gonna tell me fairy tales? James Caan in the movie "Thief" ca 1981

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: jackson #1

                          Originally posted by paul mullin
                          Jackson was the best, because unlike sherman or sheriden the two best union maneuver generals he usually engaged superior forces, at least in a numerical sense.
                          grant was the most practical and pragmatic of the generals, he new his strengths and weaknesses as well as the enemies and capitilised on it.
                          lee was a great leader and engineer, but out of his depth as an offensive general, thats where jackson came in. If jackson had lived the south would still have lost, if littl mac had still lost the election. but i believe the csa would have won gettysburg and some further battles.
                          Consider Milroy, Fremont, and Banks the three "juggernauts" who Jackson faced in his Valley Campaign. None thought to link their forces so that they would outnumber Jackson. Jackson did not face the cream of the Union in the Valley. His Seven Days record was poor (i.e., Glendale). He did well in the 2nd Manassas and Maryland Campaigns and was brilliant during Chancellorsville. That does not mean that somehow his 2nd Corps would somehow vault over the Union troops and guns already positioned on Cemetery Hill on 7/1/1863 and declare victory for the ANV. He was not there at Gettysburg and we truly cannot attribute any actions on his part there. It is only fun to speculate. For all we know he may have disagreed with Lee about what his men might accomplish late on 7/1. We know this, Early's division was not badly beaten up, but was disorganized after trying to round up prisoners in the town. Rodes' division was beaten up and Allegheny Johnson's division would not arrive until about, what, 7 pm?!
                          I come here to discuss a piece of business with you and what are you gonna do? You're gonna tell me fairy tales? James Caan in the movie "Thief" ca 1981

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Very good point about the valley campaign, but I contend Jackson would have come up with a better solution at getty'sburg as apposed to Lees Idiotic frontal assaults.
                            Such as interposing the anv between meade and D.C. to induce him to attack.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Jackson at Gettysburg

                              Originally posted by paul mullin
                              Very good point about the valley campaign, but I contend Jackson would have come up with a better solution at getty'sburg as apposed to Lees Idiotic frontal assaults.
                              Such as interposing the anv between meade and D.C. to induce him to attack.
                              Longstreet already came up with that solution and history has branded (in the South, at least) Longstreet as the goat of Gettysburg.
                              I come here to discuss a piece of business with you and what are you gonna do? You're gonna tell me fairy tales? James Caan in the movie "Thief" ca 1981

                              Comment

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              Working...
                              X