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  • Teddy

    From this mornings news...


    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/africa/7118245.stm


    Just how much more of a joke can Islam get?


    In case i've offended any Muslim members by saying this, i can only answer by saying... i'm not bothered in the slightest!

    regards

    Gaz

  • #2
    It's ridiculous, it is almost like some people are looking for something to be offended by. Lets hope she gets a judge with some common sense, but it does seem to be becomingly increasingly hijacked by certain political and religious parties over there.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/sudan/stor...218624,00.html

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/sudan/stor...218028,00.html

    Some of the comments on the BBC site. You have to wonder about the mentality of those who took offense, they need to grow up.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/7115400.stm
    "Patriotism is your conviction that this country is superior to all other countries because you were born in it"
    G.B Shaw

    "They promised us homes fit for heroes, they give us heroes fit for homes."
    Grandad, Only Fools and Horses

    Comment


    • #3
      I have seen it on the tellie.

      NO COMMENT
      "Ask not what your country can do for you"

      Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

      you’re entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

      Comment


      • #4
        she has been sentenced to 15 days prison and is to be deported.
        http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/africa/7119399.stm
        Never Fear the Event

        Admiral Lord Nelson

        Comment


        • #5
          It seems that everyone missed the real point - she didn't name the bear - her students did - which means they must all be stoned to death for the crime of apostasy according to Muslim law. Anyone want to take bets that the children will be praised, rather than condemned for their actions. And Sudan, oddly enough, is considered a very moderate Muslim nation.

          The insane radicalism and intolerance of Islam isn't at all amusing, but the failure of the Western world to publicize this sort of insanity and call down the wrath of the Western nations upon the perpetrators, if only in the Western media, is truly beyond belief.

          We act as though we are paralyzed whenever things like this take place, after which we resume our lives as though nothing of importance has really happened. Wd have put ourselves in thrall to the Great God known as Petroleum, and we will endure all in His Name, even the most heinous actys of murder and degradation, for without the beneficence of His power, what would millions of soccer moms do with their lives?

          We are living witnesses to one of the most historic events of all time - the decline and fall of Western Civilization, and we remain incredibly mute while it happens.
          Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

          Comment


          • #6
            The Sudanese goverment was a laugh before they went after teddy bears. Among other things they are sure that the the Nordic Engineering Batallion (Swedes and Norwegians) is made up of Mossad and CIA agents, and therefore would not be welcomed into the country with the UN.



            I wouldnt mind if someone bombed some sense into them, I mean they have helped their arabs to slaughter 200.000 civilians during the last year... and they still cant see that they have done anything wrong.
            "The secret of war lies in the communications" - Napoleon Bonaparte

            Comment


            • #7
              By their standards, based on those of Islam, they haven't. That is the true insdanity of all this.

              Now if the World Court as presented with a massive lawsuit for millions in reparations for such an incident, the Sudanese ambassador was called in a ripped apart, and this blasted all over the world on the Western media day and night until it was resolved...but we only hear about how offended they are.

              Where are the leaders of today?




              Signing aid bills for Sudan, undoubtedly.
              Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

              Comment


              • #8
                The whole incident is unbelievable. Well come to think about it the entire thing is highly believable.
                Those that forget history are condemed to repeat it.
                If you're going to be one you might as well be a BIG RED ONE

                Comment


                • #9
                  By all accounts this was an excellent teacher, and is now being forced out of the country. Sounds like the Sudanese are cutting off their nose to spite their face. It would almost be funny if I didn't think these children are now being set up to become ignorant automatons later in life...
                  Our forefathers died to give us freedom, not free stuff.

                  I write books about zombies as E.E. Isherwood. Check me out at ZombieBooks.net.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I do feel this is being blown out of all proportion. She broke the law, the judge has given her a token punishment, and then a free ticket home.

                    On TV the foreign Office keeps on showing adds pointing out that if you fall foul of another countries laws they can help, but they can't get you off.
                    Winnie says
                    ---------------------------------
                    "He fell out of a Gestapo car, over a bridge, and onto a railway line. Then was run over by the Berlin Express.

                    It was an Accident."
                    Herr Flick.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Wow, that is ludicrous. Strike another blow for the humorless and perpetually outraged.
                      TTFN

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Even Muslims living in Britain are not impressed

                        DR MUHAMMAD ABDUL BARI, spokesperson for the Muslim Council Of Britain

                        "This case should have required only simple common sense to resolve. It is unfortunate that the Sudanese authorities were found wanting in this most basic of qualities.

                        They grossly overreacted in this sad affair. Gillian should never have been arrested, let alone charged and convicted of committing a crime.

                        We hope that Gillian will be able to return home without much further delay".

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Listy View Post
                          I do feel this is being blown out of all proportion. She broke the law, the judge has given her a token punishment, and then a free ticket home.
                          On one level I agree with you. However, if I've learned anything from decades of Star Trek/Stargate/Sci-Fi/etc. you have to KNOW the law/custom/etc. you are breaking to be fully culpable when in a foreign land. Any sensible person who learned she was breaking any rules would have told her "hey, you might want to rename that teddy to something else, it could make some folks mad." Instead, some person had a grudge of some sort and took it all the way to the top so as to get her in trouble.

                          I do agree with the decision to expel her from the country, as it is the only way to protect her from the insane mob that wants her dead. Just another reversal for a country not far out of the stone age.
                          Our forefathers died to give us freedom, not free stuff.

                          I write books about zombies as E.E. Isherwood. Check me out at ZombieBooks.net.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Sickening Display of Intolerance to Start Your Weekend


                            Calls in Sudan for execution of Briton


                            KHARTOUM, Sudan - Thousands of Sudanese, many armed with clubs and knives, rallied Friday in a central square and demanded the execution of a British teacher convicted of insulting Islam for allowing her students to name a teddy bear "Muhammad."

                            In response to the demonstration, teacher Gillian Gibbons was moved from the women's prison near Khartoum to a secret location for her safety, her lawyer said.

                            The protesters streamed out of mosques after Friday sermons, as pickup trucks with loudspeakers blared messages against Gibbons, who was sentenced Thursday to 15 days in prison and deportation. She avoided the more serious punishment of 40 lashes.

                            They massed in central Martyrs Square outside the presidential palace, where hundreds of riot police were deployed. They did not try to stop the rally, which lasted about an hour.

                            "Shame, shame on the U.K.," protesters chanted.

                            They called for Gibbons' execution, saying, "No tolerance: Execution," and "Kill her, kill her by firing squad."

                            Gibbons' chief lawyer, Kamal al-Gizouli, said she was moved from the prison for her safety for the final nine days of her sentence.

                            "They moved this lady from the prison department to put her in other hands and in other places to cover her and wait until she completes her imprisonment period," he said, adding that she was in good health.

                            "They want, by hook or by crook, to complete these nine days without any difficulties, which would have an impact on their foreign relationship," he said.

                            Several hundred protesters, not openly carrying weapons, marched from the square to Unity High School, about a mile away, where Gibbons worked. They chanted slogans outside the school, which is closed and under heavy security, then headed toward the nearby British Embassy. They were stopped by security forces two blocks away from the embassy.

                            The protest arose despite vows by Sudanese security officials the day before, during Gibbons' trial, that threatened demonstrations after Friday prayers would not take place. Some of the protesters carried green banners with the name of the Society for Support of the Prophet Muhammad, a previously unknown group.

                            Many protesters carried clubs, knives and axes — but not automatic weapons, which some have brandished at past government-condoned demonstrations. That suggested Friday's rally was not organized by the government.

                            A Muslim cleric at Khartoum's main Martyrs Mosque denounced Gibbons during one sermon, saying she intentionally insulted Islam. He did not call for protests, however.

                            "Imprisoning this lady does not satisfy the thirst of Muslims in Sudan. But we welcome imprisonment and expulsion," the cleric, Abdul-Jalil Nazeer al-Karouri, a well-known hard-liner, told worshippers.

                            "This an arrogant woman who came to our country, cashing her salary in dollars, teaching our children hatred of our Prophet Muhammad," he said.
                            Britain, meanwhile, pursued diplomatic moves to free Gibbons. Prime Minister Gordon Brown spoke with a member of her family to convey his regret, his spokeswoman said.

                            "He set out his concern and the fact that we were doing all we could to secure her release," spokeswoman Emily Hands told reporters.
                            Most Britons expressed shock at the verdict by a court in Khartoum, alongside hope it would not raise tensions between Muslims and non-Muslims in Britain.

                            "One of the good things is the U.K. Muslims who've condemned the charge as completely out of proportion," said Paul Wishart, 37, a student in London.

                            "In the past, people have been a bit upset when different atrocities have happened and there hasn't been much voice in the U.K. Islamic population, whereas with this, they've quickly condemned it."

                            Muhammad Abdul Bari, secretary-general of the Muslim Council of Britain, accused the Sudanese authorities of "gross overreaction."

                            "This case should have required only simple common sense to resolve. It is unfortunate that the Sudanese authorities were found wanting in this most basic of qualities," he said.

                            The Muslim Public Affairs Committee, a political advocacy group, said the prosecution was "abominable and defies common sense."

                            The Federation of Student Islamic Societies, which represents 90,000 Muslim students in Britain and Ireland, called on Sudan's government to free Gibbons, saying she had not meant to cause offense.

                            "We are deeply concerned that the verdict to jail a schoolteacher due to what's likely to be an innocent mistake is gravely disproportionate," said the group's president, Ali Alhadithi.

                            The Ramadhan Foundation, a Muslim youth organization, said Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir should pardon the teacher.

                            "The Ramadhan Foundation is disappointed and horrified by the conviction of Gillian Gibbons in Sudan," said spokesman Mohammed Shafiq.

                            Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams, spiritual leader of the world's 77 million Anglicans, said Gibbons' prosecution and conviction was "an absurdly disproportionate response to what is at worst a cultural faux pas."

                            Foreign Secretary David Miliband summoned the Sudanese ambassador late Thursday to express Britain's disappointment with the verdict. The Foreign Office said Britain would continue diplomatic efforts to achieve "a swift resolution" to the crisis.

                            Gibbons was arrested Sunday after another staff member at the school complained that she had allowed her 7-year-old students to name a teddy bear Muhammad. Giving the name of the Muslim prophet to an animal or a toy could be considered insulting.

                            The case put Sudan's government in an embarrassing position — facing the anger of Britain on one side and potential trouble from powerful Islamic hard-liners on the other. Many saw the 15-day sentence as an attempt to appease both sides.

                            In The Times, columnist Bronwen Maddox said the verdict was "something of a fudge ... designed to give a nod to British reproof but also to appease the street."

                            Britain's response — applying diplomatic pressure while extolling ties with Sudan and affirming respect for Islam — had produced mixed results, British commentators concluded.

                            In an editorial, The Daily Telegraph said Miliband "has tiptoed around the case, avoiding a threat to cut aid and asserting that respect for Islam runs deep in Britain. Given that much of the government's financial support goes to the wretched refugees in Darfur and neighboring Chad, Mr. Miliband's caution is understandable."

                            Now, however, the newspaper said, Britain should recall its ambassador in Khartoum and impose sanctions on the Sudanese regime.
                            This is beyond sick. This is just insane. Why don't Sudanese Christians do things like this when their religion is under attack (as it is constantly around the world).

                            Just sad.
                            Last edited by CPangracs; 30 Nov 07, 12:35.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Siberian HEAT View Post
                              On one level I agree with you. However, if I've learned anything from decades of Star Trek/Stargate/Sci-Fi/etc. you have to KNOW the law/custom/etc. you are breaking to be fully culpable when in a foreign land. Any sensible person who learned she was breaking any rules would have told her "hey, you might want to rename that teddy to something else, it could make some folks mad." Instead, some person had a grudge of some sort and took it all the way to the top so as to get her in trouble.

                              I do agree with the decision to expel her from the country, as it is the only way to protect her from the insane mob that wants her dead. Just another reversal for a country not far out of the stone age.
                              You've never been picked up by (1980's vintage) Mexican police in a border city and been taken to a police court........... End result, head thonked and wallet emptied...... Lucky I had enough so that I didn't have to spend the weekend in jail...
                              “The time has come,” the Walrus said,
                              “To talk of many things:
                              Of shoes—and ships—and sealing-wax—
                              Of cabbages—and kings—
                              And why the sea is boiling hot—
                              And whether pigs have wings.”
                              ― Lewis Carroll

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