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  • Serving/Have served in Gulf

    Just curious, I am wondering, how many of the forum membership have served in the gulf ie Gulf 1, Gulf 2, current scene in Iraq.

    No I am not looking for political commentary, I ONLY want to know how many of you guys have actually been in the uniform of your country and been there.

    I ask, because of a comment (elsewhere not here at Warfare HQ), and I am curious.

    So many of us online dudes say this and say that about matters of politics, but not all of us have anything more to work with than what we see in the media (I am one of those).

    I value the remarks opinions of people that have actually been THERE and not just here.
    Life is change. Built models for decades.
    Not sure anyone here actually knows the real me.
    I didn't for a long time either.

  • #2
    Spent a year in Kuwait from 98'-99' providing Medevac coverage for all of Kuwait (not a really big place). What fun spending the day in 140 F heat. The Kuwaiti paper said we had a surface temp of 85 C one day. You can figure out how hot that is....

    If you can't set a good example, be a glaring warning.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by freightshaker
      Spent a year in Kuwait from 98'-99' providing Medevac coverage for all of Kuwait (not a really big place). What fun spending the day in 140 F heat. The Kuwaiti paper said we had a surface temp of 85 C one day. You can figure out how hot that is....

      Damn..., 85C??? That makes your boots melt, doesn't it?
      "A platoon of Chinese tanks viciously attacked a Soviet harvester,
      which was peacefully working a field near the Soviet-Chinese border.
      The harvester returned fire and upon destroying the enemy
      returned to its home base."

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      • #4
        Originally posted by freightshaker
        Spent a year in Kuwait from 98'-99' providing Medevac coverage for all of Kuwait (not a really big place). What fun spending the day in 140 F heat. The Kuwaiti paper said we had a surface temp of 85 C one day. You can figure out how hot that is....

        hmmm must be a misprint, skin burns at 60C i think. Ive been in some hot weather before mid 50C but surely 85 is not a liveable temp for a human.
        Not lip service, nor obsequious homage to superiors, nor servile observance of forms and customs...the Australian army is proof that individualism is the best and not the worst foundation upon which to build up collective discipline - General Monash

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        • #5
          I read it in the Kuwait City newspaper. Wish I would've kept it. 85 C is about 185 F I believe. We were working reverse schedule then; sleep all day, work all night. Was so hot you couldn't touch the aircraft or trucks during the day. That's surface temperature mind you so that would make the air temp around 140-150 I think.
          If you can't set a good example, be a glaring warning.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by freightshaker
            I read it in the Kuwait City newspaper. Wish I would've kept it. 85 C is about 185 F I believe. We were working reverse schedule then; sleep all day, work all night. Was so hot you couldn't touch the aircraft or trucks during the day. That's surface temperature mind you so that would make the air temp around 140-150 I think.
            Yeah ive worked in similar conditions, on a sealed road that serviced a 19km conveyor belt for iron ore. The entire thing was zinc coated and the surface temp was around 55C and the air temp 45 or more. Also the landscape is made of shiney egg shape/size iron ore, so it was f'ing hot. Just can't imagine what 85C as a surface temp would be like. We were able to cook eggs on our machinery but ide say you could do a pot roast pretty quickly with that heat.
            Not lip service, nor obsequious homage to superiors, nor servile observance of forms and customs...the Australian army is proof that individualism is the best and not the worst foundation upon which to build up collective discipline - General Monash

            Comment


            • #7
              I retired out of the Air Force three years ago.

              Prior to that, I made trips to Saudi Arabia starting in 1982. I vividly recall seeing the Kuwaiti oilfields burning from 80-100 miles away during a night sortie in the months following the first Gulf war.

              The temperature was considerably cooler during the day that summer as the sky was smudgey with black smoke.

              Flew many missions during Operation Northern Watch patroling the border between Turkey and Iraq watching the Iraqis. Main mission was command and control and surveillance. Had a hand in killing an SA-3 site during my last trip back in 2001.

              Been there, done that, glad to have served, glad to be staying home now.

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              • #8
                I got back from OIF in April of this year. I spent 3 months in Kuwait (Camp Udari and Camp Doha); and 9 months in Iraq (BIAP, Baghdad).

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Mr Dimbleby
                  I got back from OIF in April of this year. I spent 3 months in Kuwait (Camp Udari and Camp Doha); and 9 months in Iraq (BIAP, Baghdad).
                  Is "Uncle Crustys" still open on Doha? Nothing quite like having the losers of the camel race for dinner. Guess you can't complain if its free.
                  If you can't set a good example, be a glaring warning.

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                  • #10
                    I was at Doha when the 11th ACR blew up the motorpool

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by freightshaker
                      Is "Uncle Crustys" still open on Doha? Nothing quite like having the losers of the camel race for dinner. Guess you can't complain if its free.
                      Uncle Frosty's is still there. They don't serve food there anymore though. You have to walk over to ye olde food court across the street.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Gary Owen
                        I was at Doha when the 11th ACR blew up the motorpool

                        We had T-shirts made up saying "I survived the Doha Dash". Our Squadron CO banned them. Later, when I got my Hazardous Material Instructor Certification in Germany and we had to watch "Distaster in the Desert" which was, of course, us blowing up half our motorpool. Got alot of grief for that in class.
                        If you can't set a good example, be a glaring warning.

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                        • #13
                          3rd Battalion (Airborne), 4th Air Defense Artillery Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division. I think it still may be the ONLY airborne air defense regiment in the world.

                          I was inside the first 500 soldiers from the 82nd Airborne to hit the sand for the Gulf War. I was my Colonel's driver at the time, and since he was the man in charge of setting up the SHORAD air defense umbrella, we had to get there fast. Shortly before the ground war, I went back to my line unit, so I didn't miss the real action.

                          My team supported A 1st/505th PIR. Our main attack happened at Tallil Airfield. We were mission tasked with securing western Baghdad. I'm just sad that we were forced to abandon our mission before it was complete. I don't think I would be sitting here today watching my younger brothers & sisters-in-arms having to finish my work.
                          Stay Alert, Stay Alive!

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                          • #14
                            Rear detachment 197th Infantry Brigade, Ft. Benning Ga. Medicaled out 07Nov90. Processed many a pissed off reserve staying at the hill. I served as Brigade Staff Duty NCO as an E-1 from the deployment to right up to my discharge. I met all my buds when they came back and took good care of them. From the get the people watching CNN had more info than just about anybody that was there. When Sadam Invaded, the Battalion staff took our dayroom(HHC) and our CO,1stSgt, and PltSgt kicked a guy out of his room and was watching on stolen cable to keep up with what was happening.

                            Rear D was also a trip in that if any Gulf 1 vets will rember the army was getting rid of like 45 or 60 K that year. We had so many chapter cases that refused to go because just months before the Army didn't need them. All the POVs were in one motorpool and MPs and dogs after a thief was a regular event.

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                            • #15
                              22 yr 1980/2002 USMC veteran.
                              Desert Shield Desert Storm
                              11/90 to 3/91
                              Hdqtrs Sqdrn III Marine Air Wing.

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