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There may be hope for this generation after all!

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  • There may be hope for this generation after all!

    I kept bringing in the board games to my church's youth group and I've finally gotten some hooked into Avalon Hill. One fan of Axis & Allies may even be a potential Armchair Admiral. He seemed quite enthusiastic when I mentioned there was an Axis & Allies Pacific and wanted to borrow my book on warfare at sea in the age of sail. Only problem is, he's still into 3D miniatures and doesn't care for the notion of cardboard counters. This generation may yet need an imagination booster shot. I guess all those flashy computer graphics kind of atrophy your mental visualization muscles. Still, it's a good start. And an excellent way to work in a history lesson, considering what I hear these kids say they learned in history class, which is either too little, politically revised, or focused on the mundane and ignoring the interesting stuff that keeps kids dialed in.
    A new life awaits you in the off world colonies; the chance to begin again in a golden land of opportunity and adventure!

  • #2
    "... my church's youth group..."

    There you go again trying to bring positive instruction to today's youth through the vehicle of the church.

    I wonder if we can get 92 pages of debate out of this.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Martok View Post
      "... my church's youth group..."

      There you go again trying to bring positive instruction to today's youth through the vehicle of the church.

      I wonder if we can get 92 pages of debate out of this.
      Why? I'm confused on what is wrong about any of this...

      That said, the seemingly increasing topics about today's youth reminds me:

      Also showing up is that despite all the naysayers (that come in every generation) - Today's youth are spending more of their time in volunteering roles than any generation before.


      Back to the topic on hand - It's good to see some interested in things like this, but on the other hand, what's inherently better about gaming by counter other than some people enjoy it?

      I mean let's be honest, just because it used to be hobby doesn't mean it needs to be adhered to forever. Although this is slightly different, what are the inherent benefits to playing a cardboard counter game vs. playing nearly the exact same game with another "UI" (be it miniatures or computers)?
      “To discriminate against a thoroughly upright citizen because he belongs to some particular church, or because, like Abraham Lincoln, he has not avowed his allegiance to any church, is an outrage against that liberty of conscience which is one of the foundations of American life.”

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      • #4
        Originally posted by pirateship1982 View Post
        I kept bringing in the board games to my church's youth group and I've finally gotten some hooked into Avalon Hill. One fan of Axis & Allies may even be a potential Armchair Admiral. He seemed quite enthusiastic when I mentioned there was an Axis & Allies Pacific and wanted to borrow my book on warfare at sea in the age of sail. Only problem is, he's still into 3D miniatures and doesn't care for the notion of cardboard counters. This generation may yet need an imagination booster shot. I guess all those flashy computer graphics kind of atrophy your mental visualization muscles. Still, it's a good start. And an excellent way to work in a history lesson, considering what I hear these kids say they learned in history class, which is either too little, politically revised, or focused on the mundane and ignoring the interesting stuff that keeps kids dialed in.
        This sort of thing should be encouraged. I don't attend the service of my local church, but my wife worked for the office and I met some of the youngsters at a "Game Night." They all had an intrest in war-games, but had no idea about how to tell what's good or bad, technically speaking. I was able to pull out a 1978 copy of "Panzer Leader" by Avalon Hill, and I blew away the new Axis & Allies miniature game with old cardboard counters.

        There is hope....
        "This life..., you know, "the life." You’re not gonna get any medals, kid. This is not a hero business; you don’t shoot people from a mile a way. You gotta stand right next to them... blow their heads off."

        BoRG

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        • #5
          Like all generations, this one has good and bad...so will the next and the one after that. I know some great teenagers who are upright contributors to their community...I also know some real drop kicks who do little more than turn oxygen into CO2 and food into crap. So what? All I can do is ensure that my own kids fall into category A.
          The truth? You can't handle the truth! No truth handler you! I deride your truth handling abilities!
          Sideshow Bob.

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          • #6
            I work with today's youth all the time -- either as soldiers/marines, HS students, or at church. I have no big concerns about them. In many cases, they're better than their parents were.
            Barcsi János ispán vezérőrnagy
            Time Magazine's Person of the Year for 2003 & 2006


            "Never pet a burning dog."

            RECOMMENDED WEBSITES:
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            http://www.sca.org
            http://www.scv.org/
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            • #7
              Originally posted by Overseer View Post
              Back to the topic on hand - It's good to see some interested in things like this, but on the other hand, what's inherently better about gaming by counter other than some people enjoy it?
              Personally I feel the ipod generation has become too isolationist. When you have more My Space friends than real friends there is a problem. I don't see anything wrong with computer games or web forums but when that's all you're into it can be a problem. Tabletop gaming gets kids off of their computer and actually interacting with other human beings face to face. I've had a lot more fun playing chess with someone face to face than online. And Risk and Stratego or Axis and Allies are fun, but they don't have the in depth historical detail and requirement to think and understand tactics as do games like Panzer Leader.

              Plus which I think Avalon Hill (bookcase games, not Hasbro usurper games) is the golden age dynasty of wargaming unsurpassed even by the most graphics intensive games of today and I want to keep that dynasty alive.
              A new life awaits you in the off world colonies; the chance to begin again in a golden land of opportunity and adventure!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by pirateship1982 View Post
                Personally I feel the ipod generation has become too isolationist. When you have more My Space friends than real friends there is a problem. I don't see anything wrong with computer games or web forums but when that's all you're into it can be a problem. Tabletop gaming gets kids off of their computer and actually interacting with other human beings face to face. I've had a lot more fun playing chess with someone face to face than online.
                It's funny... I hear this kind of sentiment a lot -- "Oh, it's not good to spend so much time online. You need to get out and get some *real* friends."

                Why? Who's to say that the social contacts that I make online are better or worse than the people who happen to live in the same town that I live in? Who really cares if I'm "talking" to someone face to face or online?

                I guess I just don't see where in-person socializing is inherently better or worse than online socializing in and of itself -- naturally, there are things you have to be careful with when online... but I would suggest that there are just as many cautions you should make when in person. Socializing, communicating with others about a shared interest or hobby, can exist whether you're sitting next to a person or in another country.

                Don't limit yourself to just being friends with whoever lives in your neighborhood. Broaden your mind, think outside the box.
                "I am not an atomic playboy."
                Vice Admiral William P. Blandy

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by mirrorshades View Post
                  It's funny... I hear this kind of sentiment a lot -- "Oh, it's not good to spend so much time online. You need to get out and get some *real* friends."

                  Why? Who's to say that the social contacts that I make online are better or worse than the people who happen to live in the same town that I live in? Who really cares if I'm "talking" to someone face to face or online?

                  Don't limit yourself to just being friends with whoever lives in your neighborhood. Broaden your mind, think outside the box.
                  I don't have anything against online contacts. Most of my history buddies are online, Centralia is a small town. What I feel is harmful is the exclusive online contact where you have NO life outside of your computer.

                  But my #1 goal isn't getting kids off of the computer. It's teaching them history in a fun way and getting their brain muscles working with games that involve more cerebral sweat with tactics and calculations. You can teach history, math (odds and damage calculation), and geometry (eyeballing for LOS) all at once with the right AH game.

                  Besides, I also feel tabletop gaming is superior because you get better conversation. I've played games online and I've played boad games with friends and I can honestly say I went home happier after gaming with real faces. Dialogue is free and easy, with real dialogue since you aren't typing sentences but saying them, none of that "IDK, my BFF rose!" business. A couple of friends with a good sense of humor can bring down the house.

                  Also, from a tactical perspective, Chess (and poker) are arts where reading your opponents facial expressions and masking your own are a critical part of the game.
                  A new life awaits you in the off world colonies; the chance to begin again in a golden land of opportunity and adventure!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    What is the real problem?

                    Originally posted by pirateship1982 View Post
                    Personally I feel the ipod generation has become too isolationist. When you have more My Space friends than real friends there is a problem.
                    Blame the Web: Just another way to avoid sex, friends[1]

                    (or is it)

                    Blame the war: Just another excuse to avoid sex, friends?

                    Footnotes

                    [1]
                    The Web: Just another way to avoid sex, friends - Netiquette ...

                    Recently-released poll says that Americans are giving up friends and sex for Web life. But despite the suspect sciencey-goodness of such a poll, didn’t you pretty much know in ...

                    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/20999608/wid/11915829

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                    • #11
                      Are you talkin' to me?

                      Originally posted by Geek44 View Post
                      I also know some real drop kicks who do little more than turn oxygen into CO2 and food into crap.
                      Have we met?

                      "This life..., you know, "the life." You’re not gonna get any medals, kid. This is not a hero business; you don’t shoot people from a mile a way. You gotta stand right next to them... blow their heads off."

                      BoRG

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Personally I have to say that some of you are generalizing a bit much. I have a MySpace account as does almost all of my friends and out of 168 "MySpace friends" every single one of them is someone that I am also friends with in real life.

                        MySpace and Facebook has made keeping friendships intact and contact with your friends and family that are scattered all over the place due to college, cost of living issues and the military a heck of alot easier.

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