Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The military?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • The military?

    I have my sights set on a really expensive and high end college that would be hard for my parents to send me to. So I was thinking about joining the military mainly the Army or possibly the Marines? So I was wondering how intense training is and how good are the educational benefits? I know the Military is very generous to say the least with this type of stuff to say the least but is there a limit on how much they cover?

  • #2
    I'd say if you really wanted to go then go. I tried to join the National Guard but was barred becuse of me takeing medacations
    "The people never have the power, only the illusion of it. And here is the real secret: they don't want it. The responsibility is too great to bear. It's why they are so quick to fall in line as soon as someone else takes charge."
    "

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by ace View Post
      I'd say if you really wanted to go then go. I tried to join the National Guard but was barred becuse of me takeing medacations

      What conditions did you take medacations for if you don't mind me asking? I take medacations also although I could easily live without them.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Kevin23 View Post
        What conditions did you take medacations for if you don't mind me asking? I take medacations also although I could easily live without them.
        I take pills for my Aspergers/ADHD. Without them I can't function very well.
        "The people never have the power, only the illusion of it. And here is the real secret: they don't want it. The responsibility is too great to bear. It's why they are so quick to fall in line as soon as someone else takes charge."
        "

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by ace View Post
          I take pills for my Aspergers/ADHD. Without them I can't function very well.
          I have ADD and I can pretty much function ether way. However I'm sorry to hear you couldn't get in.

          Comment


          • #6
            The military is beneficial in many ways.
            You should choose a specialty that has application in the real world.

            There are educational benefits for those who are in a position to access them while serving.

            I think today's GI benefits involve some self contribution.

            You will gain maturity and experiences that will help you in your life.

            Folk who duck it miss something that is hard to explain.

            Things will change while you are away.

            You need to talk to a recruiter-be very wary of whatever he promises.

            You will have to submit your medical history.

            My 1st reaction is to BE A MAN-go Airborne Infantry!

            Not much call for them on the outside. Mebbe cop or prison guard.

            I went Abn Inf and would do it again, but not a great career path for civvy street.

            Good idea to unburdon your parents. Good luck.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Kevin23 View Post
              I have ADD and I can pretty much function ether way. However I'm sorry to hear you couldn't get in.
              Yeah, an on top of that I'm pissed that I'm barred from all other branches. I really wanted to do it.
              "The people never have the power, only the illusion of it. And here is the real secret: they don't want it. The responsibility is too great to bear. It's why they are so quick to fall in line as soon as someone else takes charge."
              "

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Kevin23 View Post
                I have my sights set on a really expensive and high end college that would be hard for my parents to send me to. So I was thinking about joining the military mainly the Army or possibly the Marines? So I was wondering how intense training is and how good are the educational benefits? I know the Military is very generous to say the least with this type of stuff to say the least but is there a limit on how much they cover?
                The national guard has a very good program called the simultanious membersip program. You go to basic and AIT, serve one weekend a month, two weeks a year, get E5 pay, and also go to ROTC. You are nondeployable for 4 years, and get a commision at the end. Then you serve the time as an officer. You get GI bill pay, allowances based on the state, and a lot more benefits. However, you cannot do a ROTC scholarship with this.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Kevin23 View Post
                  I have my sights set on a really expensive and high end college that would be hard for my parents to send me to. So I was thinking about joining the military mainly the Army or possibly the Marines? So I was wondering how intense training is and how good are the educational benefits? I know the Military is very generous to say the least with this type of stuff to say the least but is there a limit on how much they cover?
                  I can't say for the Army, but I ship out for boot camp in the Marines in two weeks. Here is what I understand about their college benifits. From what I've understood from other Marines other than my recruiter the Marines pay 100%, at least for active duty I know,, maybe for reserves, not sure about that though. The training is very hard and very intense from what I've been told. 13 weeks of boot camp followed up by 6 weeks of MCT (weapons training), followed by MOS (military occupation specialty, or your job) school. I would advise before making a decision on either one to talk to as many guys from both branches, not just the recruiters but actual soldiers and Marines, and make your decision based on their advice.
                  It's my firm conviction that when Uncle Sam calls, by God we go, and we do the best that we can. - R. Lee Ermey

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Kevin23 View Post
                    I have my sights set on a really expensive and high end college that would be hard for my parents to send me to. So I was thinking about joining the military mainly the Army or possibly the Marines? So I was wondering how intense training is and how good are the educational benefits? I know the Military is very generous to say the least with this type of stuff to say the least but is there a limit on how much they cover?
                    Ideally, you should look into a ROTC program (assuming it is offered at the college you want to go to). ROTC will cover your tuition (and maybe even room and board, books, etc...) so you won't have any loans to pay back. When I was in college, it was a 4-year commitment -- 2 years active duty, 2 years of IRR (inactive ready reserve... basically you don't have to do anything but they can call you back if they need you). You work your way through as a cadet, taking military science classes and doing exercises, training, maneuvers, summer camp, and that kind of stuff, then you get a commission as a 2 LT or equivalent when you graduate.

                    The ROTC is the equivalent of what the army calls OCS -- officer candidate school. You would then have to attend additional training for your field (artillery, infantry, signal, etc...) before being assigned to a unit.

                    Overall it's a pretty good deal -- you get your college degree and a guaranteed job at the end of it. If I had it to do over again, I would consider doing it that way (by the time I thought enough about it, I was in my junior year and had missed the cutoff date).
                    "I am not an atomic playboy."
                    Vice Admiral William P. Blandy

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by mirrorshades View Post
                      Ideally, you should look into a ROTC program (assuming it is offered at the college you want to go to). ROTC will cover your tuition (and maybe even room and board, books, etc...) so you won't have any loans to pay back. When I was in college, it was a 4-year commitment -- 2 years active duty, 2 years of IRR (inactive ready reserve... basically you don't have to do anything but they can call you back if they need you). You work your way through as a cadet, taking military science classes and doing exercises, training, maneuvers, summer camp, and that kind of stuff, then you get a commission as a 2 LT or equivalent when you graduate.

                      The ROTC is the equivalent of what the army calls OCS -- officer candidate school. You would then have to attend additional training for your field (artillery, infantry, signal, etc...) before being assigned to a unit.

                      Overall it's a pretty good deal -- you get your college degree and a guaranteed job at the end of it. If I had it to do over again, I would consider doing it that way (by the time I thought enough about it, I was in my junior year and had missed the cutoff date).

                      Very good advice mirrorshades. I keep forgetting that my situation is different from other folks sometimes. I wish I could go about it that way but I have a wife and two kids to support. But that was sound advice for Kevin.
                      It's my firm conviction that when Uncle Sam calls, by God we go, and we do the best that we can. - R. Lee Ermey

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by mirrorshades View Post
                        Ideally, you should look into a ROTC program (assuming it is offered at the college you want to go to). ROTC will cover your tuition (and maybe even room and board, books, etc...) so you won't have any loans to pay back. When I was in college, it was a 4-year commitment -- 2 years active duty, 2 years of IRR (inactive ready reserve... basically you don't have to do anything but they can call you back if they need you). You work your way through as a cadet, taking military science classes and doing exercises, training, maneuvers, summer camp, and that kind of stuff, then you get a commission as a 2 LT or equivalent when you graduate.

                        The ROTC is the equivalent of what the army calls OCS -- officer candidate school. You would then have to attend additional training for your field (artillery, infantry, signal, etc...) before being assigned to a unit.

                        Overall it's a pretty good deal -- you get your college degree and a guaranteed job at the end of it. If I had it to do over again, I would consider doing it that way (by the time I thought enough about it, I was in my junior year and had missed the cutoff date).

                        That sounds like a good idea,I'm still in high school so what would you think if I were to join up when school starts?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Being a former Marine and a Army reservist... I'd say the Marines if you want to BECOME a Marine, you know, be the best and all. If you're more interested in college money, bonuses, better treatment, and a far greater variety of guaranteed jobs, go with the Army. I'm sure you have a niche, perhaps computers, vehicle repair, etc etc, the Army can fulfill your aspirations. However, just make sure you check in with us prior to going to MEPS and signing that contract.

                          EDIT: Don't let the Army recruiters sucker you into any fuel billet!
                          Last edited by Marines; 25 Aug 07, 22:16.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Kevin23 View Post
                            That sounds like a good idea,I'm still in high school so what would you think if I were to join up when school starts?
                            You need to contact the college you want to attend and find out what they have as far as ROTC options. Most colleges have an Army ROTC, though the Air Force and Navy are around as well (not as many, though).

                            Give the ROTC office at the college you want to go to a call, and ask them to send you some information -- or, they may have it available on the website. Assuming you have applied to the college and been accepted, if you are interested in joining the ROTC program you will then need to talk to them directly. DO NOT talk to your local recruiter about it unless they (the ROTC people) specifically tell you to do so... your local recruiter is trying to meet a quota, and will explain 38 different reasons why enlisting as a buck private and going through boot camp and serving active duty *before* college is better than ROTC.

                            Anything you do will be via the ROTC office at the college you will be attending... they can walk you through the process (I think they are less of a "hard sell" than a regular recruiter, too). They can answer any questions you may have, and they will be the ones you work with to get the process started if you decide it's for you.

                            And remember... no matter what anyone else may tell you, the decision is yours and yours alone. If you don't like something you hear, or how you're being made to feel, just thank them for their time and walk away. You shouldn't feel any kind of pressure to do something you're not 100% sure about.
                            "I am not an atomic playboy."
                            Vice Admiral William P. Blandy

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by mirrorshades View Post
                              You need to contact the college you want to attend and find out what they have as far as ROTC options. Most colleges have an Army ROTC, though the Air Force and Navy are around as well (not as many, though).

                              Give the ROTC office at the college you want to go to a call, and ask them to send you some information -- or, they may have it available on the website. Assuming you have applied to the college and been accepted, if you are interested in joining the ROTC program you will then need to talk to them directly. DO NOT talk to your local recruiter about it unless they (the ROTC people) specifically tell you to do so... your local recruiter is trying to meet a quota, and will explain 38 different reasons why enlisting as a buck private and going through boot camp and serving active duty *before* college is better than ROTC.

                              Anything you do will be via the ROTC office at the college you will be attending... they can walk you through the process (I think they are less of a "hard sell" than a regular recruiter, too). They can answer any questions you may have, and they will be the ones you work with to get the process started if you decide it's for you.

                              And remember... no matter what anyone else may tell you, the decision is yours and yours alone. If you don't like something you hear, or how you're being made to feel, just thank them for their time and walk away. You shouldn't feel any kind of pressure to do something you're not 100% sure about.
                              Well, you can also go to school full-time while in the Army and the Corps. Which is also something too keep in mind.

                              Comment

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              • casanova
                                Berlin.1945
                                by casanova
                                The Sowjet T-34 tank against a German Tiger tank in Berlin in the II World War in 1945. ...
                                Yesterday, 23:41
                              • casanova
                                AW 169M
                                by casanova
                                The Austrian minister of defence Klaudia Tanner declared the buy of 18 Italian military helicopters of the type AW 169M for the Austrian army, the Bundesheer....
                                Yesterday, 23:26
                              • JBark
                                What changed?
                                by JBark
                                There was a time not too long ago when this forum was full of discussion, multiple posts, votes and involved discussions on the best of the war, etc.,...
                                Yesterday, 18:54
                              Working...
                              X