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Elevator to the Moon?

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  • Elevator to the Moon?

    At first I wanted to LOL but then I started reading and reading and...

    http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmp...ace_elevator_1

    Here's the official website of the project

    Last edited by MonsterZero; 29 Jun 04, 10:05.

    "Artillery adds dignity to what would otherwise be a ugly brawl."
    --Frederick II, King of Prussia

  • #2
    They are very serious about this.

    But for the record, of course they can't go to the moon because the moon isn't in a constant position relative to a place on earth.
    Last edited by Redwolf; 29 Jun 04, 16:37.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Redwolf
      The are very serious about this.

      But for the record, of course they can't go to the moon because the moon isn't in a constant position relative to a place on earth.
      we can fix it...
      a brain cell

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      • #4
        Once you are in orbit , going to the moon will be easy.
        ...the troops of love are pulling out... (D.A.D.)

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        • #5
          Originally posted by rasmus
          Once you are in orbit , going to the moon will be easy.
          Technically speaking, a jump will do. If you are prepared for a hard landing. And you better aim well

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Redwolf
            Technically speaking, a jump will do. If you are prepared for a hard landing. And you better aim well
            I'm not sure about that. Is a jump going to be sufficient force to acheive what is essentially just a much higher orbit? It's for sure true that most of the work is done.
            ...a man that can stand up for a principle and sit down on his own stool.
            -the Firesign Theatre

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Tiberius
              I'm not sure about that. Is a jump going to be sufficient force to acheive what is essentially just a much higher orbit? It's for sure true that most of the work is done.
              I am pretty sure it is sufficient. The reason is that you are not just resting above the earth, you rotate as earth rotates and the force from the rotation is equal to the gravity, this is why the thing doesn't fall down.

              In fact, for the space elevator I would suggest that people place it so that the rotational force is stronger than gravity (as opposed to a free floating space station where they must be equal), to keep the rope tensioned.

              So if you jump off in the right angle, you should be able to trade the rotational energy for more potentional energy (english term?) and in theory be able to leave earth orbit altogether. Plus the moon has gravity of its own so once you cross the point where its gravity becomes stronger than earth's you are all set. Just be careful that you don't accidentially enter a long-term orbit around moon, would kind of suck to spend a couple thousand years there.

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              • #8
                Watch the First Step Though....

                Remember the ending of "Space Cowboys"? A few rocket boosters and you can start playing "fly me to the moon"

                And don't forget the portable computer to calculate trajectory changes and inflight course corrections.

                The trip back might be a bit of a challenge though Anyone have an idea how much it would take to launch a spacesuited astronaut off the surface of the moon?

                I'm excited... I could see a whole new world of personal tourism developing here!
                Love & Peace,

                Far Dareis Mai

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