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Nuclear Cavity

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  • Nuclear Cavity

    Operation Nougat, 1961-1962 was a series of nuclear tests in New Mexico which included an underground shot codenamed Gnome. The 3Kt weapon was detonated deep underground and formed an interesting cavity or cave. This did not collapse like most other underground cavities and US scientists even managed to get inside to photograph the nuclear cave.


    "Artillery adds dignity to what would otherwise be a ugly brawl."
    --Frederick II, King of Prussia

  • #2
    There are all sorts of useful things you can do with precision nuclear devices. And background radiation is already pretty high so this would hardly rate any notice at all.

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    • #3
      Nice accoustics i bet, should make it a music venue!
      Not lip service, nor obsequious homage to superiors, nor servile observance of forms and customs...the Australian army is proof that individualism is the best and not the worst foundation upon which to build up collective discipline - General Monash

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      • #4
        Originally posted by MonsterZero
        Operation Nougat, 1961-1962 was a series of nuclear tests in New Mexico which included an underground shot codenamed Gnome. The 3Kt weapon was detonated deep underground and formed an interesting cavity or cave. This did not collapse like most other underground cavities and US scientists even managed to get inside to photograph the nuclear cave.

        Not really surprising, since the intense heat can melt rock. I think one of these should have been dropped down Saddam's spider hole.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Prester John
          There are all sorts of useful things you can do with precision nuclear devices. And background radiation is already pretty high so this would hardly rate any notice at all.
          Proponents of nuclear energy tried really hard to prove in the 1960s that atom bombs could be used in mining and such and many tests were conducted. Nevertheless, you just can't release all that radioactive dust into the atmosphere. Also, United States subscribes to the international treaty that bans all nuclear blasts other than very deep underground detonations that are no longer useful to construction or mining purposes. BTW, is anybody still conducting any tests at all? Probably waste of money since everything can be presented with computer simulations.

          "Artillery adds dignity to what would otherwise be a ugly brawl."
          --Frederick II, King of Prussia

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          • #6
            Shoot that's nothing...I have several nuclear cavities in my mouth.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by MonsterZero
              Proponents of nuclear energy tried really hard to prove in the 1960s that atom bombs could be used in mining[...]
              The Russians did that, plenty.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by MonsterZero
                Proponents of nuclear energy tried really hard to prove in the 1960s that atom bombs could be used in mining and such and many tests were conducted. Nevertheless, you just can't release all that radioactive dust into the atmosphere. Also, United States subscribes to the international treaty that bans all nuclear blasts other than very deep underground detonations that are no longer useful to construction or mining purposes. BTW, is anybody still conducting any tests at all? Probably waste of money since everything can be presented with computer simulations.
                Well, generally you do conduct a test (today) if you want to show that you have the bomb, AFAIK you don't do tests any more today as they are pretty expensive.
                "A platoon of Chinese tanks viciously attacked a Soviet harvester,
                which was peacefully working a field near the Soviet-Chinese border.
                The harvester returned fire and upon destroying the enemy
                returned to its home base."

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by MonsterZero
                  Nevertheless, you just can't release all that radioactive dust into the atmosphere.
                  Compared to all the radioactives floating around from the airborne and surface blasts that have been going on around the world, a few very small underground blasts wouldn't even be noticed by monitoring stations. Airline pilots get more radiation.

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                  • #10
                    Won't the explosion simply create a huge glass cavity? That can't be mined effectively?
                    "You can't change the rules in the middle of the game."
                    "Hey, you just made that rule up."


                    Heil Dicke Bertha!

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Dicke Bertha
                      Won't the explosion simply create a huge glass cavity? That can't be mined effectively?
                      The molten glass substance occurs after surface detonations in desert conditions (or the sandy islands of Pacific atolls where some of the testing took place). The radioactive glass-like mineral is called trinite, after the Trinity site where the phenomenon was first observed in June 1945. I'm not sure I understand your question though. Trinite has no mining use, it's just interesting to study maybe.

                      "Artillery adds dignity to what would otherwise be a ugly brawl."
                      --Frederick II, King of Prussia

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Dicke Bertha
                        Won't the explosion simply create a huge glass cavity? That can't be mined effectively?
                        The results of the explosion will depend upon the geology of the site. If the rock can be compressed or if there are cavities already present in the structure then the shock wave will produce a different result compared to a detonation inside a large mass of granite.

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                        • #13
                          Wonder if you did it in a coal mine would you get diamonds?
                          Not lip service, nor obsequious homage to superiors, nor servile observance of forms and customs...the Australian army is proof that individualism is the best and not the worst foundation upon which to build up collective discipline - General Monash

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Temujin
                            Wonder if you did it in a coal mine would you get diamonds?
                            Guess they would also glow in the dark...
                            "A platoon of Chinese tanks viciously attacked a Soviet harvester,
                            which was peacefully working a field near the Soviet-Chinese border.
                            The harvester returned fire and upon destroying the enemy
                            returned to its home base."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by MonsterZero
                              The molten glass substance occurs after surface detonations in desert conditions (or the sandy islands of Pacific atolls where some of the testing took place). The radioactive glass-like mineral is called trinite, after the Trinity site where the phenomenon was first observed in June 1945. I'm not sure I understand your question though. Trinite has no mining use, it's just interesting to study maybe.
                              Monster and Prester, I was thinking about the potential (or Soviet) use of nukes in mining in general, I thought that the blast (heat and pressure) underground would produce a glass(y) amorphous mineral coating the mine walls, not very good. Of course I know nothing about this. Rethinking, to produce glass, you'd need silica as in sand, quartz might do?, granite surely is something else. Sandstone (lime?) will produce marble under pressure, carbon diamonds...Granite will give, eh Kryptonite?

                              I think I need to get my hands on some Geology book...
                              "You can't change the rules in the middle of the game."
                              "Hey, you just made that rule up."


                              Heil Dicke Bertha!

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