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  • Childhood toys

    What memorable childhood toys did you grow up with? I grew up playing with Transformers, GI joes, Voltron and He man action figures and still have fond memories of having massive firefights between my sister and cousin in the backyard. I remember we used to take our parent's audio tape collection and using the cases to build forts in the living room (at least until my sister got the Ghostbusters firehouse playset). I still remember using a large die cast Tonka dune buggy as a battering ram to spearhead my assaults. I still remember the arms race we used to have between the three of us and how we often looked forward to another trip to the toy store (much to the annoyance of our parents). Ah memories.
    -----------------------------------
    Sings we a song of wolves.
    Who smells fear and slays the coward.
    Sings we a song of man.
    Who smells gold and slays his brother
    .

  • #2
    I had countless armies of toy soldiers. I'd set them up together with structures and toy tanks and artillery so they looked like an army on the offensive. Then I'd simulate enemy artillery barrages by shooting toy guns at them; plastic guns that fired some kind of a projectile. I'd try to knock them over and to collapse the structures. Setting them up around by sandbox outdoors was even better because dried chunks of sand, when thrown at them, would "explode" in puffs of sand looking like minature explosions (highly realistic).


    In addition to toy soldiers I had lots of toy guns (pistols, rifles) my friends and I would wield when playing army in the park. I was the official weapons' distributor because I had the most weaponry and the other guys would borrow for the duration of the game.

    Also, I had a collection of slot cars from Matchbox and tons of completed plastic models, mostly Soviet airliners from the East German toy company VEB Plasticard.

    I think those would be the most popular items in my childhood collection.

    "Artillery adds dignity to what would otherwise be a ugly brawl."
    --Frederick II, King of Prussia

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    • #3
      I remember having an old matchbox artillery piece. It had a spring loaded breech that would allow it to fire small projectiles. I used to stuff the barrel full of talcum powder to simulate the gun firing off a round.

      I also had a small keychain cap gun I used to play with too. It was too large for my GI joe figures to use but it fit my He man figures just fine. It was the sidearm for my Skeletor action figure.
      -----------------------------------
      Sings we a song of wolves.
      Who smells fear and slays the coward.
      Sings we a song of man.
      Who smells gold and slays his brother
      .

      Comment


      • #4
        I built tons of model airplanes. I never was much into blowing them up, mostly I hung most of mine from the ceiling in mock dogfights. I never did do the GIJoe thing much although I had plenty of the plastic toy soilders. What I really wish I had now to give to my son was my riffle. It was a bolt action with a working bolt. When you worked the bolt it had a wooden bullet inside that was attached to the bolt with a cord. It was made of wood and metal unlike the plastic Chinese junk of today that dosen't seem to last much more than a week.

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        • #5
          Similar to the rest of ya, used toy guns shooting down soldier but if the weather was fine and the parents busy it was out the back with some petrol simulating napalm strikes on them , those suckkers burn for ages.

          Also i did have a replica FN/SLR made of metal and wood which was the envy of the street during our pitched battles for control of no mans land.
          Not lip service, nor obsequious homage to superiors, nor servile observance of forms and customs...the Australian army is proof that individualism is the best and not the worst foundation upon which to build up collective discipline - General Monash

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          • #6
            Transformers, GIJoe, and He-Man were always lots of fun (except for the parents who had their basement taken over by mock battle scenes ) The big one though was Lego. I had several suitcases full of that stuff, and I'd build all sort of things. Train systems that covered nearly every square inch of the basement floor, massive mock battles, entire cities, etc. My pride and joy was once when I built a WW2 style heavy bomber with everything including fully rotating gun turrets, activated bomb bays, retractable landing gear, etc. When it was finished, it was nearly a big as I was (at the time I was 10 or 12). The wings and landing gear actually had to be pretty robust to take all the weight.

            Edit: Playmobile was big too. A bunch of us would usually combine our collections for giant battles. We always seemed to have way more people than guns, so a large number of guys would be armed with an odd assortment of shovels, picks, rakes, kitchen utensils, paddles, axes, anything really as long it could clip into their hands
            Last edited by Martin Schenkel; 29 Apr 04, 19:43.

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            • #7
              Well lets see what toys did I grow up with? Well lets see tons of plastic army men, tanks, sandbags, trucks, barb wire, and scenarie. I would cover the floor of my room in an elaborate set up and then us a small bouncy ball to roll at the opposimg side for gun fire and the flick it up in the air with my tumb (like fliping a quater) to simulate motar and arty fire. Also lots of Legos. Built hugh towns and then had my army men invade them. Lots of toy guns and camos took over the tons of woods that surround my house and played every time period of war from Dark Ages to the present with friends Then I found wargames and have been hopelessly addicted. Oh the good old days. Well they aren't that old and hey so what if I still like to set up the army men in a diarama.

              Thanks for looking!!

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              • #8
                I would've thought some of you would've said Barbie Dolls, guess I was wrong on that estimation. Hah Hah Hah.
                Furthermore, they had calculated that if 25,000 of them died for every one of us, they would finish us first, for they were many and we were but few.
                -Hernan Cortez

                The Pacific is our ocean. The power that rules the Pacific, therefore, is the power that rules the world. That power is and will forever be the American Republic.
                -Senator Albert J. Beveridge, 56th Congress

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                • #9
                  Frisbees and toy soldiers.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by MonsterZero
                    Also, I had a collection of slot cars from Matchbox and tons of completed plastic models, mostly Soviet airliners from the East German toy company VEB Plasticard.

                    Well, really this things are great! Though I didn't thought they even sold them to the US, or where did you get yours from?


                    As for me, it was also generally running around outside playing soldier, but I found out about (war) gaming quite early and noone could get me away from a game of Civilisation...
                    "A platoon of Chinese tanks viciously attacked a Soviet harvester,
                    which was peacefully working a field near the Soviet-Chinese border.
                    The harvester returned fire and upon destroying the enemy
                    returned to its home base."

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                    • #11
                      i just found my magnifying glass, havent used it in 10 years. LETS BURN SOME INSECTS!

                      and uuhmm, those plastic toy soldiers, the greens and the grey's.. and LEGO! i used to build forts then fight my toy army, concisting out of model planes, the green's, lego, thunderbirds and dinosaurs vs my brother's toy army.

                      that's 10years ago
                      French Soldier: You don't frighten us, English pig dogs. Go and boil your bottoms, you sons of a silly person. I blow my nose at you, so-called "Arthur King," you and all your silly English K-nig-hts.

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                      • #12
                        Lego, Playmobil and Tonka trucks.

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                        • #13
                          Its all coming back to me now!


                          WEATHER: Raining

                          LOCATION: Indoors

                          METHOD: Using a green vinyl bean bag form bag into peaked mountain top.

                          DEPLOYMENT: Defenders, placed inside ruts and folds in vinyl. Attackers, placed at bottom of vinyl mountain.

                          BARRAGE: Golf Balls

                          ASSAULT: Men aiming rifles provide cover while running men with fixed bayonets charge.

                          DEFENCE: HMG Teams and prone snipers.

                          DECIDING FACTOR: Big arse Childrens Bible (tactical nuke) dropped from ceiling height on top of vinyl mountain blasting men to all coreners of the globe (bedroom)

                          LESSON: Nuclear War = MAD
                          Not lip service, nor obsequious homage to superiors, nor servile observance of forms and customs...the Australian army is proof that individualism is the best and not the worst foundation upon which to build up collective discipline - General Monash

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by mr_clark
                            Well, really this things are great! Though I didn't thought they even sold them to the US, or where did you get yours from?
                            clark, I grew up in Poland behind the Iron Courtain, moved to USA after high school graduation in 1993. The East German and Czech kits were the only ones readily available and affordable in the 1980s. Beginning in 1988 or 1989 the market began to get saturated by Western kits but their price tags were discouraging.

                            The premier Czech plastic kit manufacturer of the Cold War years was Kopro. Sweet models, nothing bigger than 1/72 but great value.
                            Last edited by MonsterZero; 30 Apr 04, 08:08.

                            "Artillery adds dignity to what would otherwise be a ugly brawl."
                            --Frederick II, King of Prussia

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by MonsterZero
                              clark, I grew up in Poland behind the Iron Courtain, moved to USA after high school graduation in 1993. The East German and Czech kits were the only ones readily available and affordable in the 1980s. Beginning in 1988 or 1989 the market began to get saturated by Western kits but their price tags were discouraging.

                              The premier Czech plastic kit manufacturer of the Cold War years was Kopro. Sweet models, nothing bigger than 1/72 but great value.

                              Ohh, O.K., Well, maybe I will do what you did (go to the US or at least any "english speaking country") after I've finished my University time..., but that's distant future.
                              "A platoon of Chinese tanks viciously attacked a Soviet harvester,
                              which was peacefully working a field near the Soviet-Chinese border.
                              The harvester returned fire and upon destroying the enemy
                              returned to its home base."

                              Comment

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