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  • Anzac

    Couldn't decide which section to post this link, is it military history or current day events? Well, i think it's a bit of both so i have posted it here.

    If anyone is interested to see what ANZAC is all about go here http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/Gallery/Anzac/Anzac.htm it seems like a good site to get a quick understanding of the DAY and the history of the events.

    It is a New Zealand site so it focuses on New Zealand more than Australia but it is a shared experience for those who lived it and those who commemorate it, so it should not matter.
    Not lip service, nor obsequious homage to superiors, nor servile observance of forms and customs...the Australian army is proof that individualism is the best and not the worst foundation upon which to build up collective discipline - General Monash

  • #2
    Very interesting site on a very interesting subject. There were a number of Irish raised regiments who took part in the Gallipoli campaign. One of the worst incidents was on the first day when the Dublin Fusiliers and Munster Fusiliers were slaughtered while trying to disembark from the ''River Clyde''

    ''At 0625, the naval bombardment stopped and the skipper of a ship called the Clyde ran her aground on the beach just under the ancient Fort at Sedh-el-Bahr. The section of the beach assigned to the Dublin and Munster Fusiliers was called V Beach. The assault by the Irish was met by a tornado of bullets from the Turks. The Sailors had great difficulty in trying to anchor the pontoon barges. The sally ports opened on the Clyde and the Dublins and Munsters poured out into a hail of Turkish gunfire.''

    from

    http://www.tcd.ie/General/Fusiliers/...L/fus_reg2.htm

    So WWI has a shared resonance around the world even in the 21st Century.
    http://www.irelandinhistory.blogspot.ie/

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    • #3
      Nice site.

      Comment


      • #4
        The Turkish SOB in charge of the defenses was one Mustafa Kemal, a brilliant career officer who later became president of Turkey and founder of the modern Turkish Republic. It was the activities of that one man that meant the difference between Turkish victory and defeat because overall the Turkish grunts were of the worst quality.

        It is ironic that the butcher of the Australians proved to be a man who founded modern, democratic Turkey which, while being an Islamic nation, is so progressive, tolerant and respected compared to those *******ed Arabs. My sister and brother in law (they live in Poland) have gone on vacation in the Turkish Riviera and raved about it. If it weren't for Kemal's work, Turkey could have been a xenophobic, anti-Western, fundamentalist hell.

        Aussies spotted Kemal on the ridge at one point and fired at him but they missed.
        Last edited by MonsterZero; 25 Apr 04, 09:40.

        "Artillery adds dignity to what would otherwise be a ugly brawl."
        --Frederick II, King of Prussia

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        • #5
          Originally posted by MonsterZero
          The Turkish SOB in charge of the defenses was one Mustafa Kemal, a brilliant career officer who later became president of Turkey and founder of the modern Turkish Republic. It was the activities of that one man that meant the difference between Turkish victory and defeat because overall the Turkish grunts were of the worst quality.

          It is ironic that the butcher of the Australians proved to be a man who founded modern, democratic Turkey which, while being an Islamic nation, is so progressive, tolerant and respected compared to those *******ed Arabs. My sister and brother in law (they live in Poland) have gone on vacation in the Turkish Riviera and raved about it. If it weren't for Kemal's work, Turkey could have been a xenophobic, anti-Western, fundamentalist hell.

          Aussies spotted Kemal on the ridge at one point and fired at him but they missed.
          You have such a nice way with words

          Why do you call him a SOB, he was a great man of the 20th C, Also i dont think the quality of the Turks was too bad. And what is so ironic about Mustafa? As a military officer it was his job/duty to fight Australians i would hardly call him a butcher of Australians, leave that to the English command of the day, they were the true butchers.

          Jeez your an isecure fellow MZ, does it have something to do with your Polishness? Got a hate on for Tatars still?

          'Anzac Cove is the heart of the Anzac battlefield and today’s beach is only 600 m long and 10 m wide. In 1915 it was over double the width but the effects of time have eroded it badly. Although this beach is so historically important, much of the movement of troops and stores occurred just 1-km north at what was known at North Beach. In the sides of the first row of ridges towering above the beach, the headquarters of the Anzac forces were established and were no more than 1 km behind the front line. The entire perimeter of Anzac is less than 3.5 km and the total area 3 sq miles. At the northern point of Anzac Cove is a Turkish stone monolith in which, carved in bas relief, are the words of Ataturk delivered in 1934 to the first major delegation of visitors from Australia, New Zealand and Britain:

          Those heroes that shed their blood

          And lost their lives ...

          You are now lying in the soil of a friendly country.

          Therefore rest in peace.

          There is no difference between the Johnnies

          And the Mehmets to us where they lie side by side

          Here in this country of ours ...

          You, the mothers,

          Who sent their sons from far away countries

          Wipe away your tears,

          Your sons are now lying in our bosom and in peace.

          After having lost their lives on this land

          They have become our sons as well.'
          Last edited by Temujin; 25 Apr 04, 09:52.
          Not lip service, nor obsequious homage to superiors, nor servile observance of forms and customs...the Australian army is proof that individualism is the best and not the worst foundation upon which to build up collective discipline - General Monash

          Comment


          • #6
            I don't think many Australians would think of Kemal Atatürk as a butcher. That position is usually reserved for a British general. The Turks are generally held in a certain esteem as effective fighters during the war and friends in the years since.

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            • #7
              Well, when I said "SOB" I meant "tough guy", not a villain. As for my insecurity, well, the Tatars (mongols) were actually progressive guys compared to the vermin that populates the Arab world these days. Occasionally you could reason with Tatars and strike deals cemented with a big chest of gold, a deal they honored. You can't reason with Arabs because they're too dumb and they're traitors too.

              "Artillery adds dignity to what would otherwise be a ugly brawl."
              --Frederick II, King of Prussia

              Comment


              • #8
                From what I have gathered it is similar in some ways to Memorial Day (honoring the war dead)here in the US. However it seems yall have managed to keep the focus more. I would suspect half the people in the US would have no clue what Memorial Day is about if the nightly news didn't remind them every year.

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                • #9
                  Yes ANZAC Day is a day of remembrance (of a campaign that ended in defeat, as well as for all conflicts since then). There is also the 11th of November which is Remembrance Day, not a public holiday like ANZAC day, but is in line with other countries that fought with us in WW1.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by MonsterZero
                    <snip>
                    You can't reason with Arabs because they're too dumb and they're traitors too.
                    When you are finished with that brush could I borrow it? I have some walls to paint and that is the broadest brush I seen.

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                    • #11
                      Here in the US November 11th is Veterans day to honor all Veterans. Most people do get the day off and their are parades and such.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by MonsterZero
                        Well, when I said "SOB" I meant "tough guy", not a villain. As for my insecurity, well, the Tatars (mongols) were actually progressive guys compared to the vermin that populates the Arab world these days. Occasionally you could reason with Tatars and strike deals cemented with a big chest of gold, a deal they honored. You can't reason with Arabs because they're too dumb and they're traitors too.
                        Ok maybe it was Mamelukes then? And when PJ finishes with your brush id like to use it too, 'You can't reason with Polish Americans because they're too dumb and they're racist too.' I only need to know two of them to come to that assertion.

                        Looks like i dont need your brush after all
                        Not lip service, nor obsequious homage to superiors, nor servile observance of forms and customs...the Australian army is proof that individualism is the best and not the worst foundation upon which to build up collective discipline - General Monash

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          On the topic of Kemal/Ataturk a memorial to him forms part of the offical war memorials here in Canberra. He and the men he lead at Galipoli are highly regarded by modern Australians.
                          Owner and operator, Armed Forces of the Asia Pacific
                          Forum administrator, www.orbat.com
                          Co-administrator, www.historic-battles.com

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                          • #14
                            In Oz we celebrate Nov. 11 as the end of WW1

                            Yeah, we pay more respect to the Turks than we do to the Brits that got us killed

                            Btw, fellow aussies, what do you think about Howards trip to Baghdad? Coupled with Hill's trip to Gallipoli, I have to say it's a good move on the Libs side.

                            Especially with Latham arcing up about some nonsense
                            Now listening too;
                            - Russell Robertson, ruining whatever credibility my football team once had.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Latham's an idiot and each time he opens his trap he proves it.

                              As for the trip, I'd appreciate it if I was there, and ANZAC Day would be the best time. I don't envy whoever was in charge of security for the trip though.

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