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  • War President's

    Just curious, who was (if ever) the last US President who did not involve American forces in a conflict, in any shape or form be it minor conflict or 'advisors' like was used in Vietnam?

    Those that had shortlived terms excluded.

    I cant think of any.
    Not lip service, nor obsequious homage to superiors, nor servile observance of forms and customs...the Australian army is proof that individualism is the best and not the worst foundation upon which to build up collective discipline - General Monash

  • #2
    Originally posted by Temujin
    Just curious, who was (if ever) the last US President who did not involve American forces in a conflict, in any shape or form be it minor conflict or 'advisors' like was used in Vietnam?

    Those that had shortlived terms excluded.

    I cant think of any.

    You'd have to look pre-41

    "Have you forgotten the face of your father?"

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Tim McBride
      You'd have to look pre-41

      or post 1865 maybe? Not if you include conflicts with Native Americans.
      Last edited by Temujin; 20 Apr 04, 23:15.
      Not lip service, nor obsequious homage to superiors, nor servile observance of forms and customs...the Australian army is proof that individualism is the best and not the worst foundation upon which to build up collective discipline - General Monash

      Comment


      • #4
        There must have been one or two surely. Maybe between the Korean and Vietnam wars. What about after Vietnam? Its a hard question.

        Comment


        • #5
          Well, as far as I know the last country the USA was at "war" with was the Third Reich, gonna check this in one of my books, though.
          So the last Presidents at war were F.D.Roosevelt and H.Truman.
          Last edited by mr_clark; 21 Apr 04, 04:12.
          "A platoon of Chinese tanks viciously attacked a Soviet harvester,
          which was peacefully working a field near the Soviet-Chinese border.
          The harvester returned fire and upon destroying the enemy
          returned to its home base."

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Sharpe
            There must have been one or two surely. Maybe between the Korean and Vietnam wars. What about after Vietnam? Its a hard question.
            Vietnam was no war, AFAIK a declaration of war must pass congress but this never was tried.
            Also just after (or during) the Vietnam operations, there was this law passed that congress is allowed to order troops to get home after some time even if war was not declared.
            "A platoon of Chinese tanks viciously attacked a Soviet harvester,
            which was peacefully working a field near the Soviet-Chinese border.
            The harvester returned fire and upon destroying the enemy
            returned to its home base."

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by mr_clark
              Well, as far as I know the last country the USA was at "war" with was the Third Reich, gonna check this in one of my books, though.
              So the last Presidents at war were F.D.Roosevelt and H.Truman.
              Yes but im talking about ANY conflict not just wars, or any action where the president has sent troops to a conflict. I definately can't think of one after WW2 that has not sent soldiers into conflict. Maybe between the two world wars or between the pacification of the Native Americans and Cuba.
              Not lip service, nor obsequious homage to superiors, nor servile observance of forms and customs...the Australian army is proof that individualism is the best and not the worst foundation upon which to build up collective discipline - General Monash

              Comment


              • #8
                OK I am going to have to do some digging as this has got me curious. I am thinking possibly Washington. There may be one from the post Indian war eras but around that time we also had some problems in the Phillipines, Korea and a few other places. BTW 1865 would not be the cutoff for Indian Pacification or whatever you want to call it. Again I would have to do some research but I am thinking close to 1900 on that.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by BigDog
                  OK I am going to have to do some digging as this has got me curious. I am thinking possibly Washington. There may be one from the post Indian war eras but around that time we also had some problems in the Phillipines, Korea and a few other places. BTW 1865 would not be the cutoff for Indian Pacification or whatever you want to call it. Again I would have to do some research but I am thinking close to 1900 on that.
                  I would have said late 1870's was the end of fighting the Indians 1900 is a time of expansionism for the US with Cuba, Phillipines and maybe a few small islands in pacific.
                  Not lip service, nor obsequious homage to superiors, nor servile observance of forms and customs...the Australian army is proof that individualism is the best and not the worst foundation upon which to build up collective discipline - General Monash

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Whiskey Rebellion, 1794---Washington ordered 15,000 troops to Pennsylvania and crushed the first challenge to federal authority.

                    http://www.americanpresidents.org/pr...sidentNumber=1

                    Well this sorta is a military operation that fits the question i asked, plus in other pages i looked at they mentuioned he stabilised the northwest, what that means i don't know maybe fighting indians at the time
                    Not lip service, nor obsequious homage to superiors, nor servile observance of forms and customs...the Australian army is proof that individualism is the best and not the worst foundation upon which to build up collective discipline - General Monash

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by BigDog
                      OK I am going to have to do some digging as this has got me curious. I am thinking possibly Washington. There may be one from the post Indian war eras but around that time we also had some problems in the Phillipines, Korea and a few other places. BTW 1865 would not be the cutoff for Indian Pacification or whatever you want to call it. Again I would have to do some research but I am thinking close to 1900 on that.
                      Nope sorry Washington is definately out!

                      ' In the American Revolution the British, as the French had done earlier, made extensive use of Indians to fight the colonists. After the war settlers pushed west of the mountains, and new fighting erupted. North of the Ohio River, in 1790 and 1791, Little Turtle led warriors of the Miami, Shawnee, and other tribes to victories over U.S. troops before the Indians were crushed by Gen. "Mad Anthony" Wayne in the Battle of fallen timbers in 1794. The Shawnee chief, Tecumseh, carried on, striving to forge a grand alliance of tribes west of the mountains. His dream was shattered by the Indiana Territory Governor William Henry Harrison at the Battle of Tippecanoe in 1811. Tecumseh fell in battle during the war of 1812, in which Indians once again aided the British. In the South, Indian resistance collapsed after Gen. Andrew Jackson defeated the Creeks in 1814 at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend, located in present-day Alabama.'

                      http://www.gbso.net/skyhawk/indianwa.htm
                      Not lip service, nor obsequious homage to superiors, nor servile observance of forms and customs...the Australian army is proof that individualism is the best and not the worst foundation upon which to build up collective discipline - General Monash

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Sharpe
                        There must have been one or two surely. Maybe between the Korean and Vietnam wars. What about after Vietnam? Its a hard question.
                        The Korean War never technically ended. It's basically a cease-fire that's lasted 50 years. Also, I think the North never agreed to the armistice terms.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by mr_clark
                          Vietnam was no war, AFAIK a declaration of war must pass congress but this never was tried.
                          Putting out an official declaration of war does not happen these days, it's kind of an "outdated fashion".

                          The President only asks Congress for the permission to use force "if necessary" and then make war as he sees fit.

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                          • #14
                            Well it looks like the answer is none.

                            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Militar..._United_States

                            There is a gap in what is shown here post WW I but at that time US Navy gunboats were patrolling the Yangtzee river in China.

                            Also note that Wounded Knee was 1890. Horseshoe Bend and one of the trailheads for the Trail of Tears are both about 30 miles or so from where I live. I have a good bit of Cherokee and Creek in my family and know a bit about some of the Indian wars and thought they pretty much went on until around 1900.

                            So look fellows if we invade a country or two its just traditional ya know.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by BigDog
                              Well it looks like the answer is none.

                              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Militar..._United_States

                              There is a gap in what is shown here post WW I but at that time US Navy gunboats were patrolling the Yangtzee river in China.

                              Also note that Wounded Knee was 1890. Horseshoe Bend and one of the trailheads for the Trail of Tears are both about 30 miles or so from where I live. I have a good bit of Cherokee and Creek in my family and know a bit about some of the Indian wars and thought they pretty much went on until around 1900.

                              So look fellows if we invade a country or two its just traditional ya know.
                              OK as long as its not personal, wouldn't want to think you didnt like us
                              Not lip service, nor obsequious homage to superiors, nor servile observance of forms and customs...the Australian army is proof that individualism is the best and not the worst foundation upon which to build up collective discipline - General Monash

                              Comment

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