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  • Unanimous UN Support for US Iraq Plan

    After much rangling we have consensus....(on some things at least)

    FOXNEWS.COM

    Security Council Passes Iraq Resolution

    Thursday, October 16, 2003

    UNITED NATIONS In a slam-dunk vote, the U.N. Security Council on Thursday approved a U.S.-drafted resolution to help reconstruct Iraq.

    All 15 Security Council (search) members -- including Syria -- voted in favor of the measure to authorize a multinational force under U.S. command and call for troop contributions from other countries. The measure also seeks "substantial pledges" from the 191 United Nations member states.

    Germany, France and Russia -- the leading opponents to the U.S.-led war in Iraq -- earlier made headlines when they said they would vote in favor of the resolution. That decision -- announced by German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder (search) at a European summit in Brussels -- marked a dramatic shift by the three European countries, who had bitterly opposed the U.S.-led war in Iraq.

    The three refused to give support for a U.N. resolution authorizing the use of force to oust deposed Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein (search) and had differed with the United States over the timing of returning the Arab country to full sovereignty.

    But French officials said the European support would not translate into the funds and troops sought by the United States to ease the burden of American forces in Iraq. France has been the most outspoken critic of Washington's Iraq policies.

    "We agreed that the resolution is really an important step in the right direction," Schroeder said after a 45-minute conference call with presidents Jacques Chirac of France and Vladimir Putin of Russia. "Many things have been included from what we proposed. This led us ... to jointly agree to the resolution."

    Putin, who was in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, as a special observer at an Islamic summit, said the leaders had agreed on a common position.

    Before the vote, China indicated it might support for the resolution.

    "Our attitude has become more and more positive," said China's U.N. Ambassador Wang Guangya, whose country supported the package of French-Russian-German amendments.

    "For China, what we want to see is a stronger role for the U.N. and early return of the sovereignty. At this stage, I think this resolution is far from what (we) expect. But I think as council members, we should always be ready to make compromises," he said Wednesday.

    Although the Security Council remains split on how fast to transfer power to Iraqis -- and who should oversee Iraq's political transition from a dictatorship to a democracy -- the compromise appeared to be part of an effort to send a more united message on the importance of returning sovereignty to Iraq.

    "Above all the unity of the international community must be preserved as much as possible," Chirac spokeswoman Catherine Colonna said.

    However, she added that the three countries "are very far from being able to commit themselves financially or militarily" to the reconstruction of Iraq.

    A Wednesday vote had been delayed so the leaders of Russia, France and Germany could decide Thursday morning whether to back the resolution -- despite Washington's refusal to support their key demand that it include a timetable to transfer power to Iraqis.

    U.S. officials maintained that power cannot be completely turned over to local authorities until more stability is achieved in the region. U.S. and coalition forces, as well as Iraqis and others helping coalition efforts to rebuild the country, have come under attack almost daily from supposed Saddam loyalists. These insurgents have also attacked infrastructures such as oil pipelines.

    Pakistan's U.N. Ambassador Munir Akram, whose country was considered a swing vote, announced support for the U.S. draft "despite some reservations on certain provisions."

    After rejecting the French-Russian-German demand for a timetable, the United States homed in on Russia in its search for votes. Moscow has taken a more moderate position than France and Germany.

    Council diplomats said Washington asked what Moscow wanted and it submitted three amendments Wednesday morning. Less than 12 hours later they were accepted "99 percent by the sponsors" and included in a fifth draft of the resolution, said Russia's U.N. Ambassador Sergey Lavrov.

    The amendments would give U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan greater scope to participate in the drafting of a new Iraqi constitution and the political transition, and would state for the first time that the mandate of the multinational force authorized by the resolution would expire when an Iraqi government is elected.

    Nations, including India, Pakistan and Turkey have said it would be easier to commit troops if they served under a U.N. mandate.

    Facing rising costs and casualties in Iraq, the Bush administration initially focused on getting more countries to provide troops and money to help stabilize and rebuild Iraq.

    France, Russia and Germany changed the focus to the quick restoration of Iraq's sovereignty, forcing the United States to make clear it has no intention of remaining an occupying power.

    The United States and Britain never wavered in their assessment that sovereignty can't be relinquished until Iraq drafts a new constitution and holds elections.

    They agreed, however, to include new provisions urging the U.S.-led Coalition Provisional Authority "to return governing responsibilities and authorities to the people of Iraq as soon as practicable" and calling on the Iraqi Governing Council to provide the Security Council with a timetable for drafting a new constitution and holding elections by Dec. 15.

    The Associated Press contributed to this report.
    Last edited by DeconMan; 16 Oct 03, 10:03.
    It may be that at some time in the dim future of the race the need for war will vanish: but that time is yet ages distant. As yet no nation can hold its place in the world, or can do any work really worth doing, unless it stands ready to guard its right with an armed hand." - President Teddy Roosevelt
    (Quoted in Edmund Morris, The Rise Of Theodore Roosevelt, p. 594)

  • #2
    Shame the US wants backing now, the war was done without backing and never seeked to approve it unless it was on US terms, i.e -war. The US is realising that the bodycount is climbing and so is the cost. The cost incidently that would sure help alleviate some of the socio-economic problems in the US. What is that term I was thinking opf to sum up the US version of their war.......DOH....thats the one!

    Comment


    • #3
      The amendments would give U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan greater scope to participate in the drafting of a new Iraqi constitution and the political transition, and would state for the first time that the mandate of the multinational force authorized by the resolution would expire when an Iraqi government is elected.

      Nations, including India, Pakistan and Turkey have said it would be easier to commit troops if they served under a U.N. mandate.

      Facing rising costs and casualties in Iraq, the Bush administration initially focused on getting more countries to provide troops and money to help stabilize and rebuild Iraq.

      France, Russia and Germany changed the focus to the quick restoration of Iraq's sovereignty, forcing the United States to make clear it has no intention of remaining an occupying power.

      The United States and Britain never wavered in their assessment that sovereignty can't be relinquished until Iraq drafts a new constitution and holds elections.
      The thing to watch for in all this is the constitution and who is paying for this all. If the Kurds get any autonomy and Shi'i get citizenship even when they are clearly Iranian, then the US has been screwed and we have been tubes for these interests and their sympathizers all along.
      Get the US out of NATO, now!

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by SparceMatrix
        The thing to watch for in all this is the constitution and who is paying for this all. If the Kurds get any autonomy and Shi'i get citizenship even when they are clearly Iranian, then the US has been screwed and we have been tubes for these interests and their sympathizers all along.
        Excellent point. There's still a long way to go before Iraq can truly be called a success. At least we're moving in the right direction. Let's hope it stays that way.

        Comment


        • #5
          The UN knows how to screw itself at every turn imaginable. For now, I believe most people would agree this is more of an success for the United Nations than the US. They held fast, validated the organization's importance, and even made America squirm a little. The long term implications might be less fruitful than some hope. Once again, alot of American eyes are on the international community. To some that might not be important. Then again, that could be the answer that more people adopt when questioning the UN and the international community. Sometimes victors can be loosers as well.

          Either way, it does not help President Bush. As CINC, all his last minute political moves (some real cute ones I must admit), will not erase previous mistakes. $87 Billion. That number will almost certainly carry Bush right out of office.
          Last edited by Deltapooh; 16 Oct 03, 14:26.
          "As soon as men decide that all means are permitted to fight an evil, then their good becomes indistinguishable from the evil that they set out to destroy."-Christopher Dawson - The Judgement of Nations, 1942

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Deltapooh
            The UN knows how to screw itself at every turn imaginable. For now, I believe most people would agree this is more of an success for the United Nations than the US. They held fast, validated the organization's importance, and even made America squirm a little. The long term implications might be less fruitful than some hope. Once again, alot of American eyes are on the international community. To some that might not be important. Then again, that could be the answer that more people adopt when questioning the UN and the international community. Sometimes victors can be loosers as well.

            Either way, it does not help President Bush. As CINC, all his last minute political moves (some real cute ones I must admit), will not erase previous mistakes. $87 Billion. That number will almost certainly carry Bush right out of office.
            How can $87 billion could carry Bush out of office? The US economy has over $3 or 4 trillion dollars, which is collected by the US government by taxes and other revenues. To me, it's hardly a dent in the US budget. Besides, the Congress said the new budget resolution would be passed anyway.

            Finally, recently, the US economy has shown it is coming out of recession and will grow faster than the European counterparts. And all of this is on Bush's watch, thus he can rightfully consider this a victory of sorts.

            Bush has over $83 million in his campaign war chest, and I bet you, by next year, he's going to spend every cent of it to drive the Democratic candidates into ground. No, sir, Bush will win the presidential election.

            Dan
            Major James Holden, Georgia Badgers Militia of Rainbow Regiment, American Civil War

            "Aim small, miss small."

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Cheetah772
              How can $87 billion could carry Bush out of office? The US economy has over $3 or 4 trillion dollars, which is collected by the US government by taxes and other revenues. To me, it's hardly a dent in the US budget. Besides, the Congress said the new budget resolution would be passed anyway.
              Bush doesn't have a lot going for him expect one thing: the Democrats. They will probably elect the wrong candidate and allow him to win another close election.
              "There is no great genius without some touch of madness."

              Seneca (5 BC - 65 AD)

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Cheetah772
                How can $87 billion could carry Bush out of office? The US economy has over $3 or 4 trillion dollars, which is collected by the US government by taxes and other revenues. To me, it's hardly a dent in the US budget. Besides, the Congress said the new budget resolution would be passed anyway.
                Most Americans can think of eighty-seven billion ways to spend that $87 billion dollars. Helping out an ungrateful Iraqi people doesn't rate high on many's list. Congress didn't have a problem with unilateral military action. They did express concerns about America standing alone in financing Iraq's reconstruction. Bush made alot promises about how this could be achieved. None have panned out.

                Bush needs to prove to Americans the money is well worth it. Politically, he achieved that this round by assigned more than 75% of the money to go to the military. Next year, he won't be so lucky, I can assure you.

                Originally posted by Cheetah772
                Finally, recently, the US economy has shown it is coming out of recession and will grow faster than the European counterparts. And all of this is on Bush's watch, thus he can rightfully consider this a victory of sorts.
                I believed we have been emerging out of recession for at least six months now. It's about as bad a statement as Iraq's claim "there are no American troops in Baghdad," as 3ID tanks rolled through the streets.

                Originally posted by Cheetah772
                Bush has over $83 million in his campaign war chest, and I bet you, by next year, he's going to spend every cent of it to drive the Democratic candidates into ground. No, sir, Bush will win the presidential election.
                It won't be enough to cover his butt. Bush has a tough fight on his. I really question if he can win it. He made alot of bad deals to get the domestic support, and hasn't fest up. Clark is a real threat, even the Democrats are worried about him. Bush, who is campaigning as CINC will have to neutralize a career officer who held a command, which required considerable political experience.

                On the plus side, Bush appears to be learning how play dirty at the UN. He got member-states to openingly admit they wanted the US to remain heavily involved in Iraq even after elections. However, I still believe his decision not to address this issue on April 9, 2003 was a very serious mistake.

                President Bush's foriegn policies have by-in-large failed. If Americans believe he wasted a good opportunity, or ultimately defiled the ideals that arose from the 9/11 disaster, he is pretty much screwed. More importantly, Bush is increasingly becoming dependent on conditions he really has little control over. Iraq is one of them. Alot of the violence we see in Iraq is part of an effort to remove an obstacle to greater power. Social issues, which has divided Iraq for decades are on the brink of being unleashed, and to be honest, there isn't a whole lot we can do, except get the hell out of the way.
                "As soon as men decide that all means are permitted to fight an evil, then their good becomes indistinguishable from the evil that they set out to destroy."-Christopher Dawson - The Judgement of Nations, 1942

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Deltapooh
                  I believed we have been emerging out of recession for at least six months now. It's about as bad a statement as Iraq's claim "there are no American troops in Baghdad," as 3ID tanks rolled through the streets.
                  No, officially the recession has been over for 18 months.
                  "There is no great genius without some touch of madness."

                  Seneca (5 BC - 65 AD)

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