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  • Astroturf!

    If you can't quite manage to get the grass roots to take hold, you can always plant astroturf...instructions here

    Must be nice to have access to all that government information to "enlist" soldiers in your propaganda efforts.
    I have no problem at all with being proved wrong. Especially when being proved wrong leaves the world a better place, than being proved right...

  • #2
    Originally posted by JAMiAM
    If you can't quite manage to get the grass roots to take hold, you can always plant astroturf...instructions here

    Must be nice to have access to all that government information to "enlist" soldiers in your propaganda efforts.
    Well, it's interesting to note that most of these soldiers did agree with the form letters' sentiments.

    Granted, obviously, it is a part of PR offensive to discredit the media's negative portrayal of the ongoing Iraqi occupation, but it would be nice if the soldiers actually signed the letters or expressed in their own words how much they have accomplished.

    Whatever you think of it, if the soldiers pretty much agreed with the statement expressed in the letters, then obviously, it's the truth. The only sin was not getting these soldiers' signatures.

    Dan
    Major James Holden, Georgia Badgers Militia of Rainbow Regiment, American Civil War

    "Aim small, miss small."

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Cheetah772
      Whatever you think of it, if the soldiers pretty much agreed with the statement expressed in the letters, then obviously, it's the truth. The only sin was not getting these soldiers' signatures.
      Did you miss this part?

      Quote---
      A seventh soldier didn't know about the letter until his father congratulated him for getting it published in the local newspaper in Beckley, W.Va.

      "When I told him he wrote such a good letter, he said: 'What letter?' " Timothy Deaconson said Friday, recalling the phone conversation he had with his son, Nick. "This is just not his (writing) style."
      ---end quote
      I have no problem at all with being proved wrong. Especially when being proved wrong leaves the world a better place, than being proved right...

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by JAMiAM
        Did you miss this part?

        Quote---
        A seventh soldier didn't know about the letter until his father congratulated him for getting it published in the local newspaper in Beckley, W.Va.

        "When I told him he wrote such a good letter, he said: 'What letter?' " Timothy Deaconson said Friday, recalling the phone conversation he had with his son, Nick. "This is just not his (writing) style."
        ---end quote
        did you miss this part?

        Six soldiers reached by GNS directly or through their families said they agreed with the letter's thrust. But none of the soldiers said he wrote it, and one said he didn't even sign it.

        Marois, 23, told his family he signed the letter, said Moya Marois, his stepmother. But she said he was puzzled why it was sent to the newspaper in Olympia. He attended high school in Olympia but no longer considers the city home, she said. Moya Marois and Alex's father, Les, now live near Kooskia, Idaho.

        ...............

        Sgt. Shawn Grueser of Poca, W.Va., said he spoke to a military public affairs officer whose name he couldn't remember about his accomplishments in Iraq for what he thought was a news release to be sent to his hometown paper in Charleston, W.Va. But the 2nd Battalion soldier said he did not sign any letter.

        Although Grueser said he agrees with the letter's sentiments, he was uncomfortable that a letter with his signature did not contain his own words or spell out his own accomplishments.
        The emphasis is mine.

        I'm not trying to take out the context, clearly, the soldiers were upset or puzzled why the public affairs didn't ask for their signatures or gave their lists of personal accomplishments, however, they (for most part) did agree with the letters' "thrust." I think in this respect, the letters did violate the soldiers' the right to speak for themselves or permission for their signatures.

        Now, it would be nice to get Nick Deaconson's opinion of the letter. I can't speak for him, but I wouldn't surprised if he agreed with the letter's sentiment.

        Dan
        Major James Holden, Georgia Badgers Militia of Rainbow Regiment, American Civil War

        "Aim small, miss small."

        Comment


        • #5
          Amazing how well this stuff grows when you water it a bit, and sprinkle it liberally (oops, there's the L word) with manure...
          I have no problem at all with being proved wrong. Especially when being proved wrong leaves the world a better place, than being proved right...

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by JAMiAM
            Amazing how well this stuff grows when you water it a bit, and sprinkle it liberally (oops, there's the L word) with manure...
            And once again, the six soldiers also agreed with the letters' sentiments. So, my dear friend, what's your point? The only sin was that the letters violated the military ethics, it doesn't mean the substance of the letters is false.

            Dan
            Major James Holden, Georgia Badgers Militia of Rainbow Regiment, American Civil War

            "Aim small, miss small."

            Comment

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