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Gee, this makes me want to fly.

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  • Gee, this makes me want to fly.

    http://news.com.au/common/story_page...55E2%2C00.html

    Top secret airport files stolen
    September 5, 2003

    THE Australian Federal Police and Customs were investigating the theft of computer equipment from the cargo processing and intelligence centre at Sydney International Airport, an AFP spokeswoman said today.

    Customs officials have said the stolen computers held thousands of confidential files, including top-secret communications between customs investigators, the AFP and ASIO.

    But the AFP would not confirm exactly what was stolen.

    Two men of Pakistani-Indian-Arabic appearance presented themselves as computer technicians and were given unfettered access to the airport's top security mainframe room on August 27, a Sydney newspaper reported.

    "Inside, they spent two hours disconnecting two computers, which they put on trolleys and wheeled out of the room, past the security desk, into the lift and out of the building," the paper said.

    'Quite strange'

    Former NSW assistant police commissioner Paul McKinnon, who headed police operations at the Sydney Olympics, said the break-in was a wake-up call for airport security.

    "It probably would not be a place where there was a requirement to hold nationally sensitive information," Mr McKinnon told ABC Radio.

    "Unfortunately it happens, and I guess this is a substantial wake-up call to harden security arrangements in every aspect of the aviation facility there at Mascot."

    Mr McKinnon said there should have been tighter security at the airport.

    "Normally in that setting, there would be barriers they'd have to cross and then certainly be issued with visitor passes and operate under supervision," he said.

    "It all seems quite strange."

    The AFP spokeswoman today confirmed an investigation into the incident was underway.

    "The AFP is working closely with the Customs service in relation to an investigation into the theft of computer equipment from Mascot which is reported to have happened 27th of August," she said.

    Australia's top security agencies will reportedly conduct emergency damage audits following the theft.

    "The Australian Federal Police and ASIO, the two chief guardians against terrorism, fired off angry memos to customs officials, demanding to know the extent to which their top-secret operations have been compromised," the newspaper said.
    "Experience should teach us to be most on our guard to protect liberty when the government’s purposes are beneficent. Men born to freedom are naturally alert to repel invasion of their liberty by evil-minded rulers. The greatest dangers to liberty lurk in insidious encroachment by men of zeal, well-meaning but without understanding."

    – Associate Justice Louis D. Brandeis, Olmstead vs. United States.

  • #2
    I'm certain there are criminals and terrorists that will pay millions for those files.
    "As soon as men decide that all means are permitted to fight an evil, then their good becomes indistinguishable from the evil that they set out to destroy."-Christopher Dawson - The Judgement of Nations, 1942

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    • #3
      Heh, this is just plain funny.

      http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmp...towaway_flight

      FBI Probes How Man Shipped Self to Texas
      By DAVID KOENIG, Associated Press Writer

      DALLAS - A homesick shipping clerk had himself shipped from New York to Dallas in an airline cargo crate, startling his parents — and a deliveryman — when he broke out of the box outside their home.


      Charles D. McKinley, 25, was arrested and jailed on unrelated bad-check and traffic charges after his overnight odyssey. Federal officials are considering additional charges of stowing away on a plane.


      "My husband asked him, `Man, what are you doing in this crate?' He said he was coming home," McKinley's mother told KDFW-TV in Dallas.


      Federal officials want to know how the stowaway bypassed airport security.


      In a rambling jailhouse interview, McKinley told KXAS-TV in Dallas that he made the trip because he was homesick and a friend thought he could save money by flying as cargo. McKinley said he took no food or water on the 15-hour journey, just a cell phone, which did not work.


      "I'm sitting there thinking, `Oh God, I don't know why I'm doing this,'" he said. "I'm sitting there thinking like any minute somebody will notice that there's somebody sitting inside this crate. ... No one did."


      Before setting out, McKinley filled out shipping instructions saying the crate held a computer and clothes. Authorities believe he had help from at least one co-worker at the warehouse where he works in New York when he loaded himself in the box.


      The box was taken by truck from New York's Kennedy Airport to New Jersey. Then it was loaded onto a pressurized, heated cargo plane operated by Kitty Hawk Cargo. It flew from Newark, N.J., to Niagara Falls, N.Y., then to the carrier's hub in Fort Wayne, Ind., and on to Dallas, the FBI (news - web sites) said.


      On Saturday, Billy Ray Thomas, a driver for Pilot Air Freight, picked up the crate at Dallas-Fort Worth Airport and delivered it to McKinley's parents' home in suburban DeSoto.


      When Thomas went to unload the 350-pound crate from his truck, he saw a pair of eyes and thought there was a body inside.


      Then McKinley broke the box open and crawled out, said police Lt. Brian Windham.


      McKinley's mother was stunned. The delivery driver called police.


      DeSoto police said the crate measured 42 by 36 by 15 inches. McKinley stands 5-foot-8 and weighs 170 pounds, authorities said.


      Authorities said they did not know whether McKinley had any toilet facilities. But the stowaway told the TV station that got out of the crate during flights once or twice and walked around.


      His box was carried in the pressurized, heated cabins, but could just as easily have been placed in the lower, unpressurized holds, said Richard G. Phillips, chief executive of Pilot Air Freight.


      "He could easily have died," Phillips said.


      The freight cost — billed to McKinley's employer — was $550. At that rate, "he could have flown first-class," Phillips said.





      Investigators from the federal Transportation Security Administration interviewed McKinley twice to learn how he got past security.

      "We're not aware this has happened previously, so obviously it's something we are investigating aggressively," TSA spokeswoman Suzanne Luber said.

      Air cargo receives less federal security attention than passenger planes, in part because of its sheer volume, and critics have suggested that terrorists could use cargo flights as weapons.

      Other than the federal statute, District Attorney Bill Hill said he could not cite any law that McKinley broke.

      "He violated the law of stupidity if nothing else," Hill said.
      "Experience should teach us to be most on our guard to protect liberty when the government’s purposes are beneficent. Men born to freedom are naturally alert to repel invasion of their liberty by evil-minded rulers. The greatest dangers to liberty lurk in insidious encroachment by men of zeal, well-meaning but without understanding."

      – Associate Justice Louis D. Brandeis, Olmstead vs. United States.

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      • #4
        He used a box? I was planning to just stick a Fedex sticker on my forehead and walking onto the plane. hehe.

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        • #5
          The saddest part of all is that he could have flown first class instead of in the box for what was paid. Plus he wouldn't have run the risk of being charged for it .
          "Experience should teach us to be most on our guard to protect liberty when the government’s purposes are beneficent. Men born to freedom are naturally alert to repel invasion of their liberty by evil-minded rulers. The greatest dangers to liberty lurk in insidious encroachment by men of zeal, well-meaning but without understanding."

          – Associate Justice Louis D. Brandeis, Olmstead vs. United States.

          Comment


          • #6
            You're right about that Mike, this guy is going to be paying for this decision for a long time.

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