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  • #91
    The worst states to grow old in

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/real...snbcrd#image=1
    Whiskey for my men, and beer for my horses.
    TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
    Bock's First Law of History: The Past shapes the Present, which forms the Future. *

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    • #92
      Huh...I'm surprised to see Colorado on the list, given the large number of military retirees.
      Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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      • #93
        I am surprised that all those Northern States with severe Winters are rated high. There are a lot of retirees who don't want to fool with snow anymore.

        Pruitt
        Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

        Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

        by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

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        • #94
          The Colorado Springs area, with easy access to medical care and commissary/PX facilities, is a mecca for military retirees, and if one lives out in the sticks a little bit as we do, life is relatively inexpensive compared to many regions. And a lot of retirees like the outdoors activities such as skiing, hunting, fishing, hiking and so forth. Quite frankly, this "study" does not seem very credible.
          Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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          • #95
            Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
            I don't buy this list. But others have hit upon the salient points.
            Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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            • #96
              The list in the OP is inane. It's criteria for determining ranking is totally worthless. Education attainment and the poverty rate of the elderly?

              I'd think that stuff like climate, cost of living, access to medical care and its cost, that sort of thing would determine the best and worst places for older people who are retired to live.

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              • #97
                Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
                The list in the OP is inane. It's criteria for determining ranking is totally worthless. Education attainment and the poverty rate of the elderly?

                I'd think that stuff like climate, cost of living, access to medical care and its cost, that sort of thing would determine the best and worst places for older people who are retired to live.
                Exactly.
                Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

                Comment


                • #98
                  Originally posted by Pruitt View Post
                  I am surprised that all those Northern States with severe Winters are rated high. There are a lot of retirees who don't want to fool with snow anymore.

                  Pruitt
                  There are also a lot that remain active and can deal better with cold than extreme heat, humidity and bugs. I love the four seasons.

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                  • #99
                    Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
                    Huh...I'm surprised to see Colorado on the list, given the large number of military retirees.
                    Colorado is the 6th BEST to retire in. Further down you go the worse the state is.
                    Eagles may fly; but weasels aren't sucked into jet engines!

                    "I'm not expendable; I'm not stupid and I'm not going." - Kerr Avon, Blake's 7

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                    • Originally posted by RichardS View Post
                      Colorado is the 6th BEST to retire in. Further down you go the worse the state is.
                      What? You don't think you would like to retire in Trinidad?!
                      Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

                      Comment


                      • 5 big retirement mistakes people don't realize they are making
                        https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/reti...eSK?li=BBnb7Kz

                        14 retirement mistakes you will regret forever
                        https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/reti...erT?li=BBnbfcN
                        Whiskey for my men, and beer for my horses.
                        TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                        Bock's First Law of History: The Past shapes the Present, which forms the Future. *

                        Comment


                        • What a comfortable retirement costs in each state

                          https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/reti...JBp?li=BBnb7Kz
                          Whiskey for my men, and beer for my horses.
                          TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                          Bock's First Law of History: The Past shapes the Present, which forms the Future. *

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
                            What a comfortable retirement costs in each state

                            https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/reti...JBp?li=BBnb7Kz
                            Interesting. This assumes all retirees are able to save $1 or $2 million in life savings. This is impossible, unless you're able to invest in bonds or stocks or a decent house in a neighborhood that's easy to sell from a very young age. With today's workers often moving about, their ability to invest wisely in these things is stretched to the limit.

                            I'm 39 and I don't have that kind of dough to begin with. I'll be lucky if I can save even $50,000 by time I retire at 70. Honestly no matter where I decide to retire, in 30 years, almost every state will be expensive to live in anyway.
                            Major James Holden, Georgia Badgers Militia of Rainbow Regiment, American Civil War

                            "Aim small, miss small."

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                            • Originally posted by Cheetah772 View Post

                              Interesting. This assumes all retirees are able to save $1 or $2 million in life savings. This is impossible, unless you're able to invest in bonds or stocks or a decent house in a neighborhood that's easy to sell from a very young age. With today's workers often moving about, their ability to invest wisely in these things is stretched to the limit.

                              I'm 39 and I don't have that kind of dough to begin with. I'll be lucky if I can save even $50,000 by time I retire at 70. Honestly no matter where I decide to retire, in 30 years, almost every state will be expensive to live in anyway.
                              Do you have a 401k or 403b at work? If not, start a Roth IRA. It's never too late to start. Even $3000 a year for the next 30 years is $90,000. Invest it wisely in index mutual funds by Fidelity or Vanguard, and it will be worth quite a bit more, if historical gains are realized. I tell people all the time that it's easier to work when you get old because you want to and not because you have to. It's not what you save, it's how much what you save, earns.

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                              • A good way to calculate is called the Rule of 72. What that means is that you divide 72 by whatever your annual earnings percentage to figure out how long it takes your money to double. For example---if your S&P500 index mutual fund averages 7% growth a year, it'll take you 10 years to double. If a fund averages 9% annually, it'll only take 8 years.
                                It's a mind game. As soon as I invest any money, I forget it exists. I never think of pulling it out and spending it. It's always for "the future", which keeps getting further away, the older I get. I'm doing okay now, so I don't need it.

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