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  • How do people drown?

    Today, dozens more people drowned trying to cross the Med.

    How do they manage to do that?

    I mean, people are buoyant - they don't sink. If I go out on the ocean and lay down, I just float. I don't sink.

    One time, I went scuba diving and forgot my weight belt. Without the weight belt to take me under the surface, I had to fight like Hell to get under the water.

    Yet, I sometimes see accounts/movies of people drowning and sinking to the bottom of swimming pools.

    How does this happen?

    Philip
    "The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." Bertrand Russell

  • #2
    It is the fat in our bodies that provides the buoyancy. If you don't make an effort to stay afloat you will start to sink. Phillip, I bet you are like me and have ample fat to keep you afloat!

    Pruitt
    Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

    Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

    by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

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    • #3
      Bullshit!

      Find the fattest mofo available, toss him into a swimming pool. and see how long he can last.
      Flag: USA / Location: West Coast

      Prayers.

      BoRG

      http://img204.imageshack.us/img204/8757/snap1ws8.jpg

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5PtsX_Z3CMU

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      • #4
        Well, from my own experience I had to grab my son from the bottom of the pool.
        "In modern war... you will die like a dog for no good reason."
        Ernest Hemingway.

        "We're all going to die, all of us; what a circus! That alone should make us love each other, but it doesn't. We are terrorised and flattened by trivialities."
        Bukowski

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Salinator View Post
          Bullshit!

          Find the fattest mofo available, toss him into a swimming pool. and see how long he can last.
          Having a bad day? Take it out on someone else, please! Buoyancy is determined by the density of an object. If you care to google "body fat buoyancy in water" you should betaken to a page that lists an article by Scientific American titled: "Sink or Swim: Muscle versus Fat- Scientific American". Muscle is much denser than fat, ergo a fat mofo will float longer than someone with say 5% body fat.

          Pruitt
          Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

          Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

          by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

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          • #6
            If this is curiosity that kills the cat ,it's panic that drowns.
            That rug really tied the room together

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Pruitt View Post
              Having a bad day? Take it out on someone else, please! Buoyancy is determined by the density of an object. If you care to google "body fat buoyancy in water" you should betaken to a page that lists an article by Scientific American titled: "Sink or Swim: Muscle versus Fat- Scientific American". Muscle is much denser than fat, ergo a fat mofo will float longer than someone with say 5% body fat.

              Pruitt
              Get a grip. No one is trying to take over your cave.

              I call BS on fat being a better survival in water. A fat fraker will drown faster because he would be floundering in the current and would be too tired to thread water. Only in absolute calm water will buoyancy even matter - IF he did not already have cardiac arrest.
              Last edited by Salinator; 06 Jun 16, 15:57.
              Flag: USA / Location: West Coast

              Prayers.

              BoRG

              http://img204.imageshack.us/img204/8757/snap1ws8.jpg

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5PtsX_Z3CMU

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              • #8
                Swimming used to be my sport and I used to be a fully qualified life guard having taken all the exams both practical and theoretical. IIRC different people have different amounts of buoyancy and it isn't as simple as amount of fat it also involves size of body cavities (lungs stomach etc, density of skeleton (which does vary with individuals and people also vary with age etc.) What you are wearing can also be an issue. Accordingly some people will sink like the proverbial stone and one thing included in the lifeguard training was how to retrieve someone from the bottom of a pool. When people do float the natural tendency is to float feet down oftten with just the top of the head above water, mouth and nose either submerged or with water washing over them (if say at sea where the salt water makes you float a little higher but you get a rough surface). If one is a] experienced b]calm it is possible to adjust your body position so that you float leaning back with your face out of the water but again if the sea is rough you can still get water washing over it. However in the case of a sinking boat most people are neither experienced or calm. If the water is cold many people will loose conciousness quite quickly and end up floating face down. If it is very cold most people will die of this before they drown (it is reckoned that most of those lost on the Titanic died in about one and a half minutes from the cold rather than drowning).
                Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
                Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by PhilipLaos View Post
                  Today, dozens more people drowned trying to cross the Med.

                  How do they manage to do that?

                  I mean, people are buoyant - they don't sink. If I go out on the ocean and lay down, I just float. I don't sink.

                  One time, I went scuba diving and forgot my weight belt. Without the weight belt to take me under the surface, I had to fight like Hell to get under the water.

                  Yet, I sometimes see accounts/movies of people drowning and sinking to the bottom of swimming pools.

                  How does this happen?

                  Philip
                  First all is the water temperature, your body temperature will drop too low. Not such an issue in the med. Second is that some of these people don't know how to swim. Nor can you stay buoyant forever, it takes strength and sooner or later you will run out of it(and the seas are not always calm).
                  Wisdom is personal

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Karri View Post
                    First all is the water temperature, your body temperature will drop too low. Not such an issue in the med. Second is that some of these people don't know how to swim. Nor can you stay buoyant forever, it takes strength and sooner or later you will run out of it(and the seas are not always calm).

                    I think people underestimate the med, it is just as dangerous as any ocean out there.
                    One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions - Admiral Grace Hopper

                    "The eunuch should not take pride in his chastity."
                    Wu Cheng'en Monkey

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                    • #11
                      Funny that boot camp spent so much time trying to teach us how to not drown.
                      Last edited by OpanaPointer; 04 Jun 16, 06:09.
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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Chukka View Post
                        I think people underestimate the med, it is just as dangerous as any ocean out there.
                        Any large body of water is, you can get some pretty vicious storms on the Great Lakes and see Luke 8:2225 for a storm on the Sea of Galillee. In 1992 a storm whipped up 10 foot waves on this fresh water lake.
                        Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
                        Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

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                        • #13
                          Humans are only slightly buoyant. It takes effort to keep the mouth and nose above water. Panic, exhaustion and loss of body heat combine to eventually force sufficient inhalation of water to overcome buoyancy and drown people in calm water. Rough water speeds up the process.
                          Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by The Doctor View Post
                            Humans are only slightly buoyant. It takes effort to keep the mouth and nose above water. Panic, exhaustion and loss of body heat combine to eventually force sufficient inhalation of water to overcome buoyancy and drown people in calm water. Rough water speeds up the process.
                            You forgot to add a graph...

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                            • #15
                              One of my favorite things to do in swimming pools and in the ocean is just to lie back, completely relax, and float. I much prefer that to swimming. Far less strenuous. I reckon I could do that for hours. Days maybe if I had to.

                              Philip
                              "The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." Bertrand Russell

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