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  • Genes, energy use, eating and longevity

    I wasn't sure how better to title this thread or where to place it. So don't flak me for it.

    A woman has a genetic condition that causes her feet to grow out of control. They currently weigh 107 kg (17 stone). But if you look at her, apart from her feet she isn't overweight at all:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/ar...based-DNA.html

    So how did her feet grow so large? What energy source was used? I doubt she ate tons of food.

    How long can one go without food? According to this article, 2 months:

    http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-17095605

    2 months!

    So why do we eat as much as we do every day? We are taught to do so from an early age. Then there's the psychological need and the gluttony. Could eating less be actually better for health? if the right genes are there the energy will be put to good use with very high efficiency.

  • #2
    Caloric Restriction vs. Ageing

    "Calorie restriction (CR), or caloric restriction, or energy restriction, is a dietary regimen that reduces calorie intake without incurring malnutrition or a reduction in essential nutrients." - Wiki

    Here's an Abstract from a paper titled:

    "Overview of caloric restriction and ageing", Edward J. Masoro, Barshop Center for Longevity and Aging Studies, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio:

    Abstract:
    It has been known for some 70 years that restricting the food intake of laboratory rats extends their mean and maximum life span. In
    addition, such life extension has been observed over the years in many other species, including mice, hamsters, dogs, fish, invertebrate
    animals, and yeast. Since this life-extending action appears to be due to a restricted intake of energy, this dietary manipulation is referred to as
    caloric restriction (CR). CR extends life by slowing and/or delaying the ageing processes. The underlying biological mechanism responsible
    for the life extension is still not known, although many hypotheses have been proposed. The Growth Retardation Hypothesis, the first
    proposed, has been tested and found wanting. Although there is strong evidence against the Reduction of Body Fat Hypothesis, efforts have
    recently been made to resurrect it. While the Reduction of Metabolic Rate Hypothesis is not supported by experimental findings, it
    nevertheless still has advocates. Currently, the most popular concept is the Oxidative Damage Attenuation Hypothesis; the results of several
    studies provide support for this hypothesis, while those of other studies do not. The Altered Glucose–Insulin System Hypothesis and the
    Alteration of the Growth Hormone–IGF-1 Axis Hypothesis have been gaining favor, and data have emerged that link these two hypotheses as
    one. Thus, it may now be more appropriate to refer to them as the Attenuation of Insulin-Like Signaling Hypothesis. Finally, the Hormesis
    Hypothesis may provide an overarching concept that embraces several of the other hypotheses as merely specific examples of hormetic
    processes. For example, the Oxidative Damage Attenuation Hypothesis probably addresses only one of likely many damaging processes that
    underlie aging. It is proposed that low-intensity stressors, such as CR, activate ancient hormetic defense mechanisms in organisms ranging
    from yeast to mammals, defending them against a variety of adversities and, when long-term, retarding senescent processes."
    # 2005 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved

    Here's the whole paper:
    http://www.dr-jetskeultee.nl/jetskeu...00783-main.pdf

    Originally posted by Imperial View Post
    I wasn't sure how better to title this thread or where to place it. So don't flak me for it.

    A woman has a genetic condition that causes her feet to grow out of control. They currently weigh 107 kg (17 stone). But if you look at her, apart from her feet she isn't overweight at all:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/ar...based-DNA.html

    So how did her feet grow so large? What energy source was used? I doubt she ate tons of food.

    How long can one go without food? According to this article, 2 months:

    http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-17095605

    2 months!

    So why do we eat as much as we do every day? We are taught to do so from an early age. Then there's the psychological need and the gluttony. Could eating less be actually better for health? if the right genes are there the energy will be put to good use with very high efficiency.
    Last edited by Marmat; 20 Feb 16, 17:21.
    "I am Groot"
    - Groot

    Comment


    • #3
      Back when humans were hairy smelly hunter gatherers (which many still are at heart) without any means of storing or preserving food, when you got it you ate it all and when you didn't your stomach rumbled. This covered the vast majority of human existence. Abundance of food was not an everyday occurrence and not eating as much as you could when you could was a non survival trait. We are probably programmed to overeat
      Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
      Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

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      • #4
        Thanks Marmat, that's very interesting and I wasn't aware of it.

        My grandma is 81, and she eats very very little by modern standards. But is full of energy.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by MarkV View Post
          Back when humans were hairy smelly hunter gatherers (which many still are at heart) without any means of storing or preserving food, when you got it you ate it all and when you didn't your stomach rumbled. This covered the vast majority of human existence. Abundance of food was not an everyday occurrence and not eating as much as you could when you could was a non survival trait. We are probably programmed to overeat
          Are we programmed by nature or are our parents the programmers? With their emphasis on "eat everything on your plate so you'll grow up". I think our genes would do what they're supposed to do even without us eating all the food amount that a parent randomly decides we should ingest. Eating a lot and many times a day is something that parents get their children's digestive systems used to.

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          • #6
            The information being posted here is haphazard and somewhat deceptive. Caloric intake varies hugely with region, race, health and activity levels. It is not subject to an arbitrary table, chart or graph. What you can eat each day differs from what I can eat in terms of type of food, amount of food and other factors. I, for example, cannot handle a high carbohydrate intake because I am diabetic, and carbs = sugar after digestive breakdown.

            Lumberjacks can and do put away thousands of calories a day, as do professional football players and Sumo wrestlers.

            Elderly people eat very little because as they get older, their metabolism slows down enormously and they require very little. They also lose their appetite in many cases. A very large part of our problem is that not long ago - a generation or so - we had to eat a lot to provide the fuel for a very manual-labor-intensive existence. Now we have a largely sedentary existence but old habits die hard. What constitutes a "suitable diet" varies for each of us and must be calculated on that basis.

            And consider this before all else: dedicated runners have as many or more heart attacks as the sedentary and obese, and the human body is not an efficient vegan machine. We evolved to take advantage of the high energy coefficient found in protein, primarily from meats.

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            • #7
              There is some interesting evidence related to High fructose corn syrup.

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBnniua6-oM

              What I find particularly interesting is the epidemiological maps showing people in hot climates consume more soda and the poor correlation between metabolic syndrome and obesity.
              We hunt the hunters

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
                The information being posted here is haphazard and somewhat deceptive.
                Could be, I admit I made these connections and the thread after a few beers.

                But I do think we eat far more than our bodies actually need. Education, habit and the way substances play with our brain* has more to do with it. Some of that excess energy is stored as fat, a lot is probably just defecated away (or vice versa). And our bodies get "stressed" or "worn out" in this process.

                *http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/...rding-science/
                *http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/...ungry-and-fat/
                Last edited by Imperial; 22 Feb 16, 16:29.

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