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  • Should the F-word be illegal

    I saw this on one of my other forum sites and thought it might be interesting to share here...

    Abstract
    JULY 28--Yes, five months remain in the year, but we're ready to announce the winner of the prestigious 2003 Legal Document of the Year award. The below motion was filed earlier this month in connection with a criminal charge filed against a Colorado teenager. The boy's troubles started when he was confronted at school by a vice principal who suspected that he had been smoking in the boys bathroom. When presented to the principal, the kid exploded, cursing the administrator with some variants of the "F" word. For his outburst, the boy was hit with a disorderly conduct rap, which was eventually amended to interfering with the staff, faculty, or students of an educational institutional. Faced with what he thought was a speech crime, Eric Vanatta, the teen's public defender, drafted the below motion to dismiss the misdemeanor charge. The District Court document is an amusing and profane look at the world's favorite four-letter word, from its origins in 1500 to today's frequent use of the term by Eminem, Chris Rock, and Lenny Kravitz. The criminal charge, Vanatta argued in the motion, was not warranted since the use of the popular curse is protected by the First Amendment. TSG's favorite part of the motion is the chart comparing Google results for the "F" word and other all-American terms like mom, baseball, and apple pie. Sadly, Vanatta never got the chance to argue his motion before a judge. Because ten days ago he cut a plea deal that deferred prosecution of his client for four months--if the kid stays out of trouble during that period, the charge gets dismissed.

    Court document
    http://www.thesmokinggun.com/archive/fword1.html
    It may be that at some time in the dim future of the race the need for war will vanish: but that time is yet ages distant. As yet no nation can hold its place in the world, or can do any work really worth doing, unless it stands ready to guard its right with an armed hand." - President Teddy Roosevelt
    (Quoted in Edmund Morris, The Rise Of Theodore Roosevelt, p. 594)

  • #2
    The lawyer would have likely been denied his motion. The crime the student was charged with was based on his conduct and actions, not the words he used. In the words of the author, the student "exploded". This suggest he was not just cursing, but also behaving in a manner that disrupted normal activity, and threatened people in the immediate vicinity.

    Many places have what the ACLU calls "quality of life" laws that proceed deeper into moral behavior. However, they aren't used too much any more.

    Speech should not be declared illegal, unless when it is used to obstruct justice. To go beyond this would, IMHO, threaten our Constitutional rights.

    Had the kid been talking to a friend, and say the F word, and a teacher overheard, and the student was charged with a profanity crime, that would be a better case to argue Free Speech.
    "As soon as men decide that all means are permitted to fight an evil, then their good becomes indistinguishable from the evil that they set out to destroy."-Christopher Dawson - The Judgement of Nations, 1942

    Comment


    • #3
      The word "frig" or "friggin" ought to be illegal.

      I like the word "frell" or "frelling" from Farscape.
      And we are here as on a darkling plain
      Swept with confused alarms of struggle and flight,
      Where ignorant armies clash by night.


      Matthew Arnold

      Comment


      • #4
        Ahhh, the beautifull F-word! In English there are so many intelligent ways to use this little gem of the english language ....
        as a transitive verb, for instance: johnny ****ed shirley.
        as an intransitive verb: shirley ****s (...)
        it could be used as an adjective, such as: john is doing all the ****ing work.
        as part of an adverb: shirley talks too ****ing much.
        as an adverb in hencing an adjective: shirley is ****ing beautiful.
        as a noun: I don't give a ****.
        as part of a word: abso-****ing-lutely. or, in-****ing-credible.
        and, as almost every word in a sentence: **** the ****ing ****ers.
        you must realize that there aren't too many words with the versatility of ****. as in these examples describing situations such as... fraud: I got ****ed at the used car garage. dismay: ooooh, **** it. trouble: I guess I'm really ****ed now. aggression: don't **** with me, buddy! difficulty: I don't understand this ****ing question. inquiry: who the **** was that? dissatisfaction: I don't like the **** what is going on here. inconfidence: he's a ****-off. dismissal: why don't you go outside, play hide and go **** yourself?"

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Kraut2
          Ahhh, the beautifull F-word! In English there are so many intelligent ways to use this little gem of the english language ....
          as a transitive verb, for instance: johnny ****ed shirley.
          as an intransitive verb: shirley ****s (...)
          it could be used as an adjective, such as: john is doing all the ****ing work.
          as part of an adverb: shirley talks too ****ing much.
          as an adverb in hencing an adjective: shirley is ****ing beautiful.
          as a noun: I don't give a ****.
          as part of a word: abso-****ing-lutely. or, in-****ing-credible.
          and, as almost every word in a sentence: **** the ****ing ****ers.
          you must realize that there aren't too many words with the versatility of ****. as in these examples describing situations such as... fraud: I got ****ed at the used car garage. dismay: ooooh, **** it. trouble: I guess I'm really ****ed now. aggression: don't **** with me, buddy! difficulty: I don't understand this ****ing question. inquiry: who the **** was that? dissatisfaction: I don't like the **** what is going on here. inconfidence: he's a ****-off. dismissal: why don't you go outside, play hide and go **** yourself?"
          ROFLMFAO !!!

          Scientists have announced they've discovered a cure for apathy. However no one has shown the slightest bit of interest !!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Kraut2
            Ahhh, the beautifull F-word! In English there are so many intelligent ways to use this little gem of the english language ....
            as a transitive verb, for instance: johnny ****ed shirley.
            as an intransitive verb: shirley ****s (...)
            it could be used as an adjective, such as: john is doing all the ****ing work.
            as part of an adverb: shirley talks too ****ing much.
            as an adverb in hencing an adjective: shirley is ****ing beautiful.
            as a noun: I don't give a ****.
            as part of a word: abso-****ing-lutely. or, in-****ing-credible.
            and, as almost every word in a sentence: **** the ****ing ****ers.
            you must realize that there aren't too many words with the versatility of ****. as in these examples describing situations such as... fraud: I got ****ed at the used car garage. dismay: ooooh, **** it. trouble: I guess I'm really ****ed now. aggression: don't **** with me, buddy! difficulty: I don't understand this ****ing question. inquiry: who the **** was that? dissatisfaction: I don't like the **** what is going on here. inconfidence: he's a ****-off. dismissal: why don't you go outside, play hide and go **** yourself?"
            Well, Kraut2 does bring up a good point. *uck and other words classified as foul or improper language is clearly more useful than many terms.

            Then again it could be an excellent example of lazy grammar. Rappers and muscians use curse words to make up for their lack of creativity. How many times did Marvin Gaye, Elvis, the Beattles, Who, the Bee Gees, or the Carpenters cursed in a song? I'm certain Albert Eistein cursed more than once when trying to define the Law of Relatively. However, he omitted such language from his final production.
            "As soon as men decide that all means are permitted to fight an evil, then their good becomes indistinguishable from the evil that they set out to destroy."-Christopher Dawson - The Judgement of Nations, 1942

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Brevet
              The word "frig" or "friggin" ought to be illegal.

              I like the word "frell" or "frelling" from Farscape.
              Why? In 3 generations, people would be shocked to hear a 12 year old boy say 'frell'. Words are only symbols, it's the meaning implied behind them that carries the weight. And if the meaning stays the same, changing the symbol is of no use.

              As an example, Frig is (more) acceptable. Why? Because the meaning behind the symbol/word is "a more polite way of saying f*ck". If f*ck was abolished, and replaced with Frig, it would become f*ck.

              A rose by any other name...
              "When I am abroad I always make it a rule never to criticize or attack the Government of my country. I make up for lost time when I am at home."

              Winston Churchill

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Kraut2
                Ahhh, the beautifull F-word!
                I DLed that comedy bit years ago... Do you have the source? I can't recall...
                "When I am abroad I always make it a rule never to criticize or attack the Government of my country. I make up for lost time when I am at home."

                Winston Churchill

                Comment


                • #9
                  Nop, sorry, I have the .mp3 hidden somewhere but I got this text from a spanish english-learning site with no credits given or at least I couldn't understand them

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Mantis


                    Why? In 3 generations, people would be shocked to hear a 12 year old boy say 'frell'. Words are only symbols, it's the meaning implied behind them that carries the weight. And if the meaning stays the same, changing the symbol is of no use.

                    As an example, Frig is (more) acceptable. Why? Because the meaning behind the symbol/word is "a more polite way of saying f*ck". If f*ck was abolished, and replaced with Frig, it would become f*ck.

                    A rose by any other name...
                    I probably like 'frell' because Claudia Black says it a lot.
                    And we are here as on a darkling plain
                    Swept with confused alarms of struggle and flight,
                    Where ignorant armies clash by night.


                    Matthew Arnold

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Kraut2
                      Nop, sorry, I have the .mp3 hidden somewhere but I got this text from a spanish english-learning site with no credits given or at least I couldn't understand them
                      Thanks my English improved! Now I will understand the gang boy who talked to me 3 years ago in L.A. underground station.
                      a brain cell

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Brevet
                        I probably like 'frell' because Claudia Black says it a lot.
                        Hahahaha, ok, that's a good answer!
                        "When I am abroad I always make it a rule never to criticize or attack the Government of my country. I make up for lost time when I am at home."

                        Winston Churchill

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by laszlo.nemedi


                          Thanks my English improved! Now I will understand the gang boy who talked to me 3 years ago in L.A. underground station.
                          Some advice: don't talk to L.A. gang members next time you visit.
                          "There is no great genius without some touch of madness."

                          Seneca (5 BC - 65 AD)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            lenny kravitz says fekk? ah yeah, thats what i wanted to post about. We should all revert to Irish swearing. Fekk, Fekkin, Farghin, Ferghacious.. these are all the way people should be told to get the dandy fekk out.
                            Doesn't read Al Franken, can't watch Al Jazeera, will attack dumbasses. Anyone but Rumsfeld '04.

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                            • #15
                              Should it be illegal?

                              Comment

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