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  • 2000 GBP for heating?

    Just watched the news on TV. They said that during cold period (November - March I presume) the heating charges in UK go up to 2000 quid per month per an apartment. Is it true?
    "Keep Calm. Use Less X's"

  • #2
    I'd be ****ing leaving right now if that were true for me.
    I pay about 60 - 70 per month (using pre-paid card meter as my new Land lord is stuck in the 80s) and that's steep. 2,000 pounds per month would be astronomical to heat an apartment. It would have to have no roof.
    ------
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    • #3
      The mortgage on the building would probably be less.
      ...how useless it was to struggle against fortune, this being the burden of wisdom which the ages had bequeathed to him.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Selous View Post
        I'd be ****ing leaving right now if that were true for me.
        I pay about 60 - 70 per month (using pre-paid card meter as my new Land lord is stuck in the 80s) and that's steep. 2,000 pounds per month would be astronomical to heat an apartment. It would have to have no roof.
        I was beginning to feel myself a King for I pay considerably less - just about 15 or 16 GBP (sorry, that "L" symbol is lacking on my keyboard) per month here in Russia. But difference between 16 and 60 is not so drastic as if it'd be with what TV promised. Selous! you disappointed me! But... I've known it before - TV always lies. Thanks for reminding me that simple truth.

        To Lucky6: pay attention to what you post, I cannot send you 2 reps in a row!
        "Keep Calm. Use Less X's"

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        • #5
          Originally posted by dmf01 View Post
          Just watched the news on TV. They said that during cold period (November - March I presume) the heating charges in UK go up to 2000 quid per month per an apartment. Is it true?
          No, sorry. I heat a house for something like £80 quid a month. If you shop arround I could probably get it cheaper.
          "Sometimes its better to light a flamethrower than to curse the darkness" T Pratchett

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          • #6
            Home heating prices in the US are forecasted to be 15-19% higher this winter than last. Heating oil, primarily used in the northeast, are expected to reach record highs...
            The Energy Information Administration, which tracks and analyzes energy data, projects households will spend 19 percent more on average for heating oil and 15 percent more for natural gas from Oct. 1 to March 31, the period covered in its short- term energy and winter fuels outlook released today.

            “It is going to be colder than last year and as a result of that, heating bills are going to be higher,” said Adam Sieminski, administrator of EIA, in Washington today.

            http://mobile.bloomberg.com/news/201...r-returns.html
            Natural gas prices, still low at ~$3.75/mcf at the wellhead, have doubled since April. One analyst forecasted $8/mcf this winter.

            Winters in the US have actually been getting cooler over the last 20 years...



            And January heating degree days have seen a 50% increase since Al Gore received his Nobel Prize...


            With winters getting colder and natural gas drilling on the decline since 2009, the stage is set for a lot of Blue States to “freeze in the dark” this winter...

            Since the UK is affected by the same climatic teleconnections and energy prices are higher over there than they are here, I would expect that this will be a very expensive winter in the UK. Although, £2,000/month sounds way too high for an apartment. This even sounds way too high for a large home.
            Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

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            • #7
              Thanks for revealing the truth, gentlemen
              "Keep Calm. Use Less X's"

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              • #8
                The North Atlantic Oscillation has been generally negative, often strongly negative, since about 2002 and is currently indicative of a colder than average winter in the UK...



                Positive NAO is associated with warm winters in Northern Europe and the Eastern US and cold winters in Greenland and Eastern Canada. Negative NAO is associated with cold winters in Northern Europe and the Eastern US and warm winters in Greenland and Eastern Canada.
                Strong positive phases of the NAO tend to be associated with above-averagel temperatures in the eastern United States and across northern Europe and below-average temperatures in Greenland and oftentimes across southern Europe and the Middle East. They are also associated with above-average precipitation over northern Europe and Scandinavia in winter, and below-average precipitation over southern and central Europe. Opposite patterns of temperature and precipitation anomalies are typically observed during strong negative phases of the NAO. During particularly prolonged periods dominated by one particular phase of the NAO, anomalous height and temperature patterns are also often seen extending well into central Russia and north-central Siberia.

                http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/data/teledoc/nao.shtml
                The near-term NAO outlook is negative...



                So this winter will likely see lots of alarmist articles about Greenland melting while New England & the UK are freezing.
                Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

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                • #9
                  What are you on about Doc?

                  I pay around 40 euros a month here in Ireland, but there's three of use so it's 120 a month during winter. That's for 3 bedrooms and of course not all of the electricity goes to heating.
                  Wisdom is personal

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Karri View Post
                    What are you on about Doc?

                    I pay around 40 euros a month here in Ireland, but there's three of use so it's 120 a month during winter. That's for 3 bedrooms and of course not all of the electricity goes to heating.
                    I'm “on about” the fact that home heating costs are rising (although nowhere close to the £2,000 per month cited in the OP) just in time for what will likely be a colder than average winter...
                    HARD-PRESSED households face a winter of misery, as energy suppliers have begun hiking prices, with Scottish Power the latest firm to jump on the bandwagon, announcing last Monday that from December 3 it is putting prices up by 7 per cent.

                    This comes just days after British Gas and Npower revealed their bills are to rise. The former announced it is putting prices up by 6 per cent from November 16, while Npower announced that from November 26 there will be an average price rise of 8.8 per cent for gas and 9.1 per cent for electricity.

                    Elsewhere last Monday, price rises previously announced by Scottish & Southern Energy (SSE) came into effect, with tariffs rising by 9 per cent.

                    Figures from Energyhelpline.com show that after the announced price rises kick in, typical UK energy bills are set to hit £1,380 a year. The suppliers have blamed the hikes on increased costs, including transporting gas and electricity, as well as energy-efficiency programmes.

                    http://www.express.co.uk/posts/view/...n-energy-costs
                    £1,380 a year is £115 per month... €144 or $185 per month. Of course, that's the annually averaged figure, not the winter maximum.

                    If you're maxing out at €120 per month in winter, you're way below the average.
                    Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

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