Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Philip's Little English Manor (erm... manner)

Collapse
This is a sticky topic.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 100 Slang Terms From the 20th Century No One Uses Anymore

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/lifestyle/...BeS?li=BBnb7Kz

    Comment


    • Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
      100 Slang Terms From the 20th Century No One Uses Anymore

      https://www.msn.com/en-us/lifestyle/...BeS?li=BBnb7Kz
      Well i counted at least 37 that I still hear and a great many that I never heard back in the last century - crap list.
      Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
      Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

      Comment


      • Being closet and current to a thread on communications;

        How to Write Email with Military Precision
        https://getpocket.com/explore/item/h...tary-precision

        Comment


        • 25 Words That Are Their Own Opposites

          They say context is key and no time is that more true than when it comes to language. Here’s a list of words that can each mean two totally different things depending on how they are used.

          ...
          https://getpocket.com/explore/item/2...=pocket-newtab

          Comment


          • Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
            25 Words That Are Their Own Opposites

            They say context is key and no time is that more true than when it comes to language. Here’s a list of words that can each mean two totally different things depending on how they are used.

            ...
            https://getpocket.com/explore/item/2...=pocket-newtab
            18 has got the wrong end of the stick. Flog used to mean to sell and still does in parts of N England hence flogging a book - selling a book but it can also mean to steal so flogging a book in parts of NW England the opposite of selling - stealing a book

            There are some that it has missed - at least as far as British English is concerned. while for example in places "do not cross while the light is red" can mean don't cross until the light is not red and in others it means do not cross until the light is red. Again NW England (mainly parts of Merseyside) - signs on some railway crossings had to be changed because of this.
            Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
            Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

            Comment


            • Originally posted by MarkV View Post

              18 has got the wrong end of the stick. Flog used to mean to sell and still does in parts of N England hence flogging a book - selling a book but it can also mean to steal so flogging a book in parts of NW England the opposite of selling - stealing a book

              There are some that it has missed - at least as far as British English is concerned. while for example in places "do not cross while the light is red" can mean don't cross until the light is not red and in others it means do not cross until the light is red. Again NW England (mainly parts of Merseyside) - signs on some railway crossings had to be changed because of this.
              Underscoring the differences of "language" ~ "English"; 'The King's' versus we Yanks/Americans.
              Haven't tiome to delve into such, but then there are some differences with word usage for; flat, lift, bonnet, hood, chips, etc. ...

              ... my wife being a bit of an anglophile, we watch a lot of BBC programs so getting a bit of a handle on the differences of word usage here and "across the pond" "over there" ...

              Comment


              • 38 Americanisms the British Can’t Bloody Stand

                To Some of Us, Grammar Feels Personal

                ...
                https://lithub.com/38-americanisms-t...=pocket-newtab

                Comment


                • Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
                  38 Americanisms the British Can’t Bloody Stand

                  To Some of Us, Grammar Feels Personal

                  ...
                  https://lithub.com/38-americanisms-t...=pocket-newtab
                  Actually some of those so called Americanisms originally started in Britain - for example deplane was a term first used on military instructions in Iraq in the early 1920s when Britain started using converted bombers to fly troops around. The phrase detrain had been in use since the mid 19th century "The Loamshires' advance party will detrain at Aldershot" and deplane was a natural extension.
                  Learn you has been in use in the North West of Engtland for a very long time as in " You wait while your Da gets home and he'll learn you to behave like that" [ You wait until your Father gets home and he'll teach you (not) to behave like that] - it probably reached America on an emigrant boat from Liverpool. Dickens puts it in the mouth of some of his less educated characters - see Wackford Squeers the Yorkshire school master
                  Already would be heard around parts of the East End of London or indeed part of any British city with a Jewish area. Marryat uses it with Jewish characters in the early19th century. One could go on - what has happened is that words, phrases and usages once common in Britain have fallen into disuse but lived on in America and are now being reintroduced to Britain
                  Last edited by MarkV; 15 Aug 19, 05:14.
                  Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
                  Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

                  Comment


                  • ^ Interesting.
                    Seems there may have been a bit a interchange on terms and word usage kicked off back in WWII when we Yanks were over there, over sexed, and over paid, etc. As the lead paragraph of this article suggests, origin of some terms/phrases gets a bit misplaced, if not blurred;

                    " When it comes to American words and phrases creeping into British English, I like to think that I keep my cool and maintain my stiff upper lip. I’m that phlegmatic because I happen to know that “keeping your cool” and “stiff upper lip” are both American in origin. We may now think of the “stiff upper lip”—showing fortitude in the face of adversity and self-restraint in place of quivering-upper-lip emotion—as a quintessentially British attribute, but the phrase originated in America in 1815 and became popular thanks to the success of a poem by the American women’s rights activist Phoebe Cary (1824[?]–1871), which featured the lines “And though hard be the task, / Keep a stiff upper lip.” "

                    Makes one wonder if we should use the term American English (Americanish ?) to cover the differences?
                    Last edited by G David Bock; 15 Aug 19, 13:55.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
                      ^ Interesting.
                      Seems there may have been a bit a interchange on terms and word usage kicked off back in WWII when we Yanks were over there, over sexed, and over paid, etc. As the lead paragraph of this article suggests, origin of some terms/phrases gets a bit misplaced, if not blurred;

                      " When it comes to American words and phrases creeping into British English, I like to think that I keep my cool and maintain my stiff upper lip. I’m that phlegmatic because I happen to know that “keeping your cool” and “stiff upper lip” are both American in origin. We may now think of the “stiff upper lip”—showing fortitude in the face of adversity and self-restraint in place of quivering-upper-lip emotion—as a quintessentially British attribute, but the phrase originated in America in 1815 and became popular thanks to the success of a poem by the American women’s rights activist Phoebe Cary (1824[?]–1871), which featured the lines “And though hard be the task, / Keep a stiff upper lip.” "

                      Makes on wonder if we should use the term American English (Americanish ?) to cover the differences?
                      We already do. There is also Australian English and Scots both of which contain many fossil words and phrases.

                      BTW Stiff upper lip although appearing in the Massachusetts Spy in 1815 and in various other American publications originally had a different meaning - the nearest modern equivalent would be 'keeping a straight face' or 'dead pan' (like Buster Keaton).It has been suggested that the origins lie in the RN. It was the practice when sewing dead sailor into his hammock for burial at sea to pass the last stitch through the upper lip to check that he really was dead
                      Last edited by MarkV; 15 Aug 19, 13:01.
                      Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
                      Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by MarkV View Post

                        We already do. There is also Australian English and Scots both of which contain many fossil words and phrases.
                        Oh yeah, a lot of fossils in Scotland and Australia . . . .

                        Originally posted by MarkV View Post
                        Stiff upper lip . . . .
                        Perhaps to that quintessential Englishman Quentin Crisp having a "stiff upper lip" meant something else altogether.

                        Rimshot
                        I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

                        Comment


                        • [QUOTE=slick_miester;n5135057]





                          Perhaps to that quintessential Englishman Quentin Crisp /QUOTE]

                          Real name Dennis Pratt
                          Says it all really
                          Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
                          Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by MarkV View Post

                            Real name Dennis Pratt
                            Says it all really
                            There's an English joke in there somewhere . . . . .Maybe Cockney Rhyming Slang . . . .
                            I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by slick_miester View Post

                              There's an English joke in there somewhere . . . . .Maybe Cockney Rhyming Slang . . . .
                              Dictionary definition of Prat
                              1. 1.

                                an incompetent or stupid person; an idiot.
                              2. 2.
                                a person's buttocks.
                              I rest my case me lud
                              Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
                              Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

                              Comment

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              Working...
                              X