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  • Australian Politics

    I would like to request a new sub forum for Politics Central. There are currently a number of threads about Australian politics in the Asia Pacific section ; this is most likely because it's a federal election year but I think a specific sub forum on Politics Central could encourage more participation by Australians on ACG.
    The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants. Thomas Jefferson.

  • #2
    Is this being considered?
    The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants. Thomas Jefferson.

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    • #3
      Is it really that busy? The Canadians get by with a single thread they've kept going for a couple of years now. Other than that, Politics Central is so overloaded with American politics that I doubt Australian topics would get the attention they deserve.

      As it is you seem to be having good political discussions as the need arises in the East Asia and the Pacific forum. That setting also helps to both keep them in context and draw attention from members interested in Australia and the surrounding region rather than just those wanting to argue politics for politics sake.
      Any metaphor will tear if stretched over too much reality.

      Questions about our site? See the FAQ.

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      • #4
        Besides, Australian politics can be excrbly dull and meaningless at times, not all the time, but compared to the wide ranging and colorful americans, or the Euro deficient Brits, Aussie politic threads would feature headlines like....

        "American President visits Australian sheep farm....Obama purchaces wooly jumper...good for Australian trade."

        "Ausralian ambassador to Lichtenstein makes statement on European economy"

        "Aussies Control their guns...Ambassador says....Why can't you Americans?"

        Australian City of melbourne is the Most Livable city on Earth.....In a staetment made today, the Mayor of Melbourne asks all Melbournians to shut their eyes to their citie's reputation as a crime haven."

        "Australian Prime minister says "Australia must move with the times.."
        In a statement released today, PM Turnbull said, "Australia must move with the times"

        Christopher
        My Articles, ALMOST LIVE, exclusive to The Armchair!

        Soviet Submarines in WW2....The Mythology of Shiloh....(Edited) Both Sides of the Warsaw Ghetto
        GULAG Glossary....Who Really Killed The Red Baron?....Pearl Harbor At 75
        Lincoln-Douglas Debates

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Drusus Nero View Post
          Besides, Australian politics can be excrbly dull and meaningless at times, not all the time, but compared to the wide ranging and colorful americans, or the Euro deficient Brits, Aussie politic threads would feature headlines like....

          "American President visits Australian sheep farm....Obama purchaces wooly jumper...good for Australian trade."

          "Ausralian ambassador to Lichtenstein makes statement on European economy"

          "Aussies Control their guns...Ambassador says....Why can't you Americans?"

          Australian City of melbourne is the Most Livable city on Earth.....In a staetment made today, the Mayor of Melbourne asks all Melbournians to shut their eyes to their citie's reputation as a crime haven."

          "Australian Prime minister says "Australia must move with the times.."

          In a statement released today, PM Turnbull said, "Australia must move with the times"

          Christopher
          As far as Australian politics is concerned :dull is good.
          After all ,you don't'really want a repetition of November, 1975, do you ?
          "I dogmatise and am contradicted, and in this conflict of opinions and sentiments I find delight".
          Samuel Johnson.

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          • #6
            I suppose not.

            You know, I was at Canterbury Primary School on November 11 1975. I can clearly remember even us primary school kids had something to say about Edward Gough Whitlam. I have never in my life seen anything like it since. How many political stoushes can you say had kids our age chanting "Down With Fraser!"

            I admired Gough only when i read something about him as an adult. One of the books I regret getting rid of was called "The Truth of the Matter", Gough's version of events. It was small and hard covered, and his chapter on the appearance by Malcolm Fraser on the Australian political scene was called "Down Came the Squatter".

            Gough always had a silver tongue in Parliment, and he usd to make Malcolm look like a prize fool, looking at some of the issues they covered, and the debates I've troubled myself to have a look at. I firmly believe it was this very factor, Malolm's continued personal flaying on the debating floor that had as much to do with him adopting the "Blocking of Supply" strategy to begin with as anything else.

            I watched an ABC recreative docu-drama on the entire thing, and found myself being outraged by what had happened.

            Funny though, after a tenure as PM that was stormy, he lost his last election for his lack of policy correction. I thought he made a good PM, but Aussies had had enough of Fraserism. And further Malcolm made a wonderful roving ambassador for this country, with his work with UNESCO in particular. People listened to Malcolm far more in this role than they ever did as PM. And Gough, though on the moral high ground, was not very good at sorting the Australian economy, and that is why he lost the post dismissal election. the economy was the ONLY thing that mattered, not some airy political moraility play about constitutional injustice.

            I also believe that the Khemlani Loans Affair was a tragedy for Australia, because all Gough and Rex O'connor were trying to do was to borrow enough money to buy back Australian mining and industrial conglomerations. I think the figure was only 300 billion dollars (or it could have been 300 million in 1975 dollars, what a bargain!), a small price to pay to prevent the likes of Hancock from taking it all...and look at Gina Rheinhart now! Won't pay her fair share of taxes, and Gough came so close to putting a big stop to all that.

            So yes, who wants another "Dismissal"?

            May we live in boring and uninteresting times.
            Last edited by Drusus Nero; 23 Oct 15, 04:17.
            My Articles, ALMOST LIVE, exclusive to The Armchair!

            Soviet Submarines in WW2....The Mythology of Shiloh....(Edited) Both Sides of the Warsaw Ghetto
            GULAG Glossary....Who Really Killed The Red Baron?....Pearl Harbor At 75
            Lincoln-Douglas Debates

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Drusus Nero View Post
              I suppose not.

              You know, I was at Canterbury Primary School on November 11 1975. I can clearly remember even us primary school kids had something to say about Edward Gough Whitlam. I have never in my life seen anything like it since. How many political stoushes can you say had kids our age chanting "Down With Fraser!"

              I admired Gough only when i read something about him as an adult. One of the books I regret getting rid of was called "The Truth of the Matter", Gough's version of events. It was small and hard covered, and his chapter on the appearance by Malcolm Fraser on the Australian political scene was called "Down Came the Squatter".

              Gough always had a silver tongue in Parliment, and he usd to make Malcolm look like a prize fool, looking at some of the issues they covered, and the debates I've troubled myself to have a look at. I firmly believe it was this very factor, Malolm's continued personal flaying on the debating floor that had as much to do with him adopting the "Blocking of Supply" strategy to begin with as anything else.

              I watched an ABC recreative docu-drama on the entire thing, and found myself being outraged by what had happened.

              Funny though, after a tenure as PM that was stormy, he lost his last election for his lack of policy correction. I thought he made a good PM, but Aussies had had enough of Fraserism. And further Malcolm made a wonderful roving ambassador for this country, with his work with UNESCO in particular. People listened to Malcolm far more in this role than they ever did as PM. And Gough, though on the moral high ground, was not very good at sorting the Australian economy, and that is why he lost the post dismissal election. the economy was the ONLY thing that mattered, not some airy political moraility play about constitutional injustice.

              I also believe that the Khemlani Loans Affair was a tragedy for Australia, because all Gough and Rex O'connor were trying to do was to borrow enough money to buy back Australian mining and industrial conglomerations. I think the figure was only 300 billion dollars (or it could have been 300 million in 1975 dollars, what a bargain!), a small price to pay to prevent the likes of Hancock from taking it all...and look at Gina Rheinhart now! Won't pay her fair share of taxes, and Gough came so close to putting a big stop to all that.

              So yes, who wants another "Dismissal"?

              May we live in boring and uninteresting times.
              Precisely.

              Gough Whitlam, to my mind, was the perfect negation of the cliche:" Cometh the Hour, Cometh the Man". He was, definitely ,NOT the man for the hour:- the early seventies. Still, had his star risen in more auspicious times, economically ,he might have been adjudged the most significant Prime Minister Australia ever had.
              He had all the presence and gravitas of a Menzies married to the reforming zeal of a Chifley.

              As it was.......

              Not that this absolves Kerr of anything.
              "I dogmatise and am contradicted, and in this conflict of opinions and sentiments I find delight".
              Samuel Johnson.

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