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Rnd 4 Grp A-D - Albatros D.III/D.V/D.Va (Germany) vs Sopwith Camel (Britain)

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  • Slim
    replied
    The albatross for me

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  • panther3485
    replied
    Originally posted by Dibble201Bty View Post
    New Zealanders are off-shore Ozzies with culture.

    Australians are sun-drenched Scousers who yearn to be New Zealanders.

    Paul
    One of these days I'll have to go visit the place. The experience should either boost my yearning or kill it off.

    What was that about the Albatros vs the Camel? seems we just can't stop ourselves from rambling OT here.

    Better cut it out soon ....

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  • broderickwells
    replied
    Originally posted by Dibble201Bty View Post
    New Zealanders are off-shore Ozzies with culture.

    Australians are sun-drenched Scousers who yearn to be New Zealanders.

    Paul
    That's kulcha is what we've got - just like yoghurt.

    We've also got three official languages

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  • panther3485
    replied
    Originally posted by BELGRAVE View Post
    Same here really. "Native" Australians can't usually detect differences in accent/dialect ,so anyone from the UK is liable to wear the"Pommy" label: unless it's particularly blatant.

    As for myself I've been here so long that I'm called a "Skip" by non-Anglo -Australians, like all the rest,

    ("Skip" from the children's TV series "Skippy, The Bush Kangaroo").
    Scottish accents do tend to stand out considerably from English ones, though, and this is discernible even to most Aussies. A number of my Aussie-born workmates have noted that one shouldn't refer to a Scotsman as a "Pom" unless you're prepared for a very probable backlash. (OTOH, I've known some Aussies to do it deliberately for a "****-stir" precisely because they know that many Scots object to it. )
    Admittedly, that's probably less true of the Welsh whose accents might be more readily mistaken as being from "some part of England maybe"; but then again, in my experience, the Welsh tend to be less likely to object anyway.

    I lived and worked in Victoria for a year too, btw, back in the 70's; and in NSW for three.
    Last edited by panther3485; 28 Apr 15, 06:04.

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  • BELGRAVE
    replied
    Originally posted by Dibble201Bty View Post
    New Zealanders are off-shore Ozzies with culture.

    Australians are sun-drenched Scousers who yearn to be New Zealanders.

    Paul
    Not invariably: my wife's a Geordie.

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  • Dibble201Bty
    replied
    New Zealanders are off-shore Ozzies with culture.

    Australians are sun-drenched Scousers who yearn to be New Zealanders.

    Paul

    Leave a comment:


  • BELGRAVE
    replied
    Originally posted by broderickwells View Post
    Nah - Pomgolia covers Britain (the island) but not Ireland (the island) - but that's this side of the ditch.
    Same here really. "Native" Australians can't usually detect differences in accent/dialect ,so anyone from the UK is liable to wear the"Pommy" label: unless it's particularly blatant.

    As for myself I've been here so long that I'm called a "Skip" by non-Anglo -Australians, like all the rest,

    ("Skip" from the children's TV series "Skippy, The Bush Kangaroo").
    Last edited by BELGRAVE; 27 Apr 15, 23:25.

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  • marktwain
    replied
    Originally posted by panther3485 View Post
    It's been my experience here (and I've lived & worked all over Australia), that anyone who calls a Scotsman a "Pom" is risking a knuckle sandwich or at the very least, considerable indignation. The English bear it usually with good grace; often with humour; occasionally as a badge of honour and acceptance! Most of the Aussie-born Aussies I've met generally use it only when they hear an English accent.
    did you hear about the Englishman who applied to immigrate to OZ, and upon being asked if he had any criminal convictions,

    Replied that he wasn't aware that was still a pre - requisite...

    Yuck yuk yuk...

    Mea culpa..
    Here's the Sopwith Dolphin, AKA super Camel...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sopwith_Dolphin
    Last edited by marktwain; 27 Apr 15, 19:45.

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  • panther3485
    replied
    Originally posted by broderickwells View Post
    Nah - Pomgolia covers Britain (the island) but not Ireland (the island) - but that's this side of the ditch.
    It's been my experience here (and I've lived & worked all over Australia), that anyone who calls a Scotsman a "Pom" is risking a knuckle sandwich or at the very least, considerable indignation. The English bear it usually with good grace; often with humour; occasionally as a badge of honour and acceptance! Most of the Aussie-born Aussies I've met generally use it only when they hear an English accent.

    Leave a comment:


  • broderickwells
    replied
    Originally posted by Desiree Clary View Post
    Is there a little known variant, the Sopwith Dromedary?

    </weirdness>

    Susie
    The South American export model -the Sopwith Llama.

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  • broderickwells
    replied
    Originally posted by panther3485 View Post
    Yes. My understanding after 42 years "in country" is that the term "Pom" refers to the English only. Strictly speaking it usually doesn't even include other Britons such as the Scots and Welsh; and certainly not folks from the Commonwealth countries either unless they are (relatively recently migrated) English.

    ... but I digress again.
    Nah - Pomgolia covers Britain (the island) but not Ireland (the island) - but that's this side of the ditch.

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  • marktwain
    replied
    Originally posted by Desiree Clary View Post
    Is there a little known variant, the Sopwith Dromedary?

    </weirdness>

    Susie
    That was the Canadian fueled version with twin viper engines and the twelve blade counter rotating Mexican propellers, Sue.

    When last seen it was breaking the sound barrier over the North Sea...

    Labrusca- the Grapes of Wrath,- indeed

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  • Desiree Clary
    replied
    Originally posted by marktwain View Post
    I was attempting to sneak the Sopwith Dolphin in through the rear entrance


    I suppose the mysterious Sopwith Bactrian, the little known twin Camel, is completely out of the question too, Gov'nor.?
    Is there a little known variant, the Sopwith Dromedary?

    </weirdness>

    Susie

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  • marktwain
    replied
    Originally posted by panther3485 View Post
    This is getting weirder and more offbeat with each successive post, Reg.
    Ok, I'll cut back on the Four Aces fortified 'stuff'

    Back on topic, the Albatross was saddled with an outdated engine,as the BMW III high compression engine was behind on production and supplies were assigned to the Fokker Junkers shotgun marriage consortium, or the Junkers D9 and the Fokker DII

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BMW_IIIa

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  • panther3485
    replied
    Originally posted by marktwain View Post
    There is this rare photograph of the craft.

    Unfortunately, in order to boost the octane rating it was run on a mix of 50% petrol, 50/% Canadian Labrusca grape fortified 'sherry.'

    The French shot it down when it entered their airspace....
    Canadian wine is forbidden in France under ALL circumstances....
    This is getting weirder and more offbeat with each successive post, Reg.

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