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Rnd 1 Grp E - Nakajima Ki-43 Hayabusa (Japan) vs Nakajima J1N1 Gekko (Japan)

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  • Rnd 1 Grp E - Nakajima Ki-43 Hayabusa (Japan) vs Nakajima J1N1 Gekko (Japan)

    Round 1, Group E: Nakajima Ki-43 Hayabusa (Japan) vs Nakajima J1N Gekko (Japan)


    Nakajima Ki-43 Hayabusa
    The Ki-43 Hayabusa ("Peregrine Falcon") was the most widely used Japanese Army fighter. Like the A6M Zero, the radial-engined Ki-43 was light and easy to fly and became legendary for its combat performance in East Asia in the early years of the war. It could outmaneuver any opponent, but did not have armour or self-sealing tanks, and its armament was poor until its final version, which was produced as late as 1945. Allied pilots reported that the nimble Ki-43s were difficult targets but burned easily or broke apart with few hits. As with the Zero, the Ki-43 initially enjoyed air superiority in the skies of Malaya, Netherlands East Indies, Burma and New Guinea. This was due partly to the good performance of the Hayabusa and partly to the relatively small numbers of combat-ready Allied fighters. As the war progressed, however, the Ki-43 suffered from the same weaknesses as the Ki-27 and A6M Zero; light armor and less-than-effective (if any) self-sealing fuel tanks, which caused high casualties in combat. Its armament of two machine guns also proved inadequate against the more heavily armored Allied aircraft. As newer Allied fighters such as the P-47 Thunderbolt, P-38 Lightning, P-51 Mustang, F4U Corsair, F6F Hellcat and late-model Spitfire/Seafire were introduced, the Japanese were forced into a defensive war and in the later stages most of their fighters were flown by inexperienced pilots. However, even near the end, the Ki-43's excellent maneuverability could still gain advantage over rash Allied pilots. Hayabusas were well liked in the JAAF because of their pleasant flight characteristics and excellent maneuverability, and almost all JAAF fighter aces claimed victories with the Ki-43 in some part of their career. Before the end of the war, many Hayabusa units had received the new Ki-84 Hayate fighter but some units flew the Ki-43 to the end of the conflict.

    Nakajima J1N1 Gekko
    The Nakajima J1N1 Gekko ("Moonlight") was used by the Japanese Imperial Navy during World War II for reconnaissance and as a night fighter. It is the night fighter version, the J1N1-S, that we'll be focusing on here. In early 1943, the Japanese installed a pair of 20 mm cannon in a J1N1-C reconnaissance aircraft, firing upwards at a 30 degree angle in the fuselage. The field-modified J1N1-C KAI shot down two B-17s attacking air bases around Rabaul on 21 May 1943, at almost the same time as the Luftwaffe had his own success against the British using a very similar set-up; the two countries being within weeks of each other with this development*. The Navy took immediate notice and placed orders with Nakajima for the newly designated J1N1-S nightfighter. It required only two crew and like the KAI, had a pair of 20mm Type 99 Model 1 cannon firing in a 30° upward/forward angle and a second pair firing downward/forward also at 30°, placed in the fuselage behind the cabin. (This was similar to the German "Schräge Musik" configuration except with the addition of the ventral mode; the original German mount being upward-firing only.) The arrangement was very effective against American bombers and its existence was not quickly understood by the allies who had assumed the Japanese did not have the technology for night fighter designs. Early versions had nose searchlights in place of radar. Later models omitted the two lower-firing guns and added one more 20 mm cannon to face upward as with the other two (J1N1-Sa Model 11a). Other variants without nose antennae or searchlight added a 20 mm cannon to the nose. The J1N1-S was used against B-29 Superfortresses over Japan, though the lack of good radar and insufficient high-altitude performance handicapped it since usually only one pass could be made against the higher-speed B-29s. However, some skillful pilots had spectacular successes, such as Lieutenant Sachio Endo, who was credited with destroying eight B-29s and damaging another eight before he was shot down by a B-29 crew.

    (*I'm not sure if the Germans got the idea from the Japanese, or vice-versa, or if the two countries arrived at this solution independently.)


    So which Nakajima is going to survive on your vote? The Hayabusa or the Gekko?

    Only one of these two candidates will make it to the next round!

    Which of them is the more significant and/or influential?



    Candidate #69 - Nakajima Ki-43 Hayabusa (Japan)

    Full Service From (approx) – 1941
    Quantity produced - 5,919
    User Nations - Japan, China, France, Thailand

    For further info & some technical details, you can start with Wiki here:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nakajima_Ki-43











    Candidate #73 - Nakajima J1N Gekko (Japan)

    Full Service From (approx) – 1942
    Quantity produced - 479
    User Nations - Japan

    For further info & some technical details, you can start with Wiki here:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nakajima_J1N











    Consider the criteria with care! You decide!
    71
    Nakajima Ki-43 Hayabusa (Japan)
    90.14%
    64
    Nakajima J1N Gekko (Japan)
    9.86%
    7

    The poll is expired.

    Last edited by panther3485; 06 Mar 15, 23:56.
    "England expects that every man will do his duty!" (English crew members had better get ready for a tough fight against the combined French and Spanish fleets because that's what England expects! However, Scotland, Wales and Ireland appear to expect nothing so the Scottish, Welsh and Irish crew members can relax below decks if they like!)

  • #2
    Hayabusha wins!

    Pruitt
    Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

    Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

    by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

    Comment


    • #3
      'Busa all the way!

      Nightfighters have low significance.
      ALL LIVES SPLATTER!

      BLACK JEEPS MATTER!

      BLACK MOTORCYCLES MATTER!

      Comment


      • #4
        WoW!! That's that little lot done, good job I'm a late night bird. lcm1
        'By Horse by Tram'.


        I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
        " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

        Comment


        • #5
          Since the nightfighter is a copy of the ME 110, I will have to go with the fighter, although this is comparing apples to lemons.
          Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
            Since the nightfighter is a copy of the ME 110, I will have to go with the fighter, although this is comparing apples to lemons.
            Actually it wasn't. The rationale behind the Gekko was similar to that behind the Bf 110, that is, a long-range heavy fighter meant to escort bombers, but the aircraft itself had little to owe to its German contemporary.

            Comment


            • #7
              The Ki 43 had a lot of shortcomings as a fighter but the J1N1 was reputed to be a brute in the air and a poor machine all-around. It's use as a night fighter is more about its availability as an airframe than as something the IJN really wanted to use.

              Comment


              • #8
                Hayabusa for me.
                "England expects that every man will do his duty!" (English crew members had better get ready for a tough fight against the combined French and Spanish fleets because that's what England expects! However, Scotland, Wales and Ireland appear to expect nothing so the Scottish, Welsh and Irish crew members can relax below decks if they like!)

                Comment

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